Adjustable sway bars

Does anyone have any information on the adjustable sway bar kit / setup for the SLC? I ordered and paid for those when I originally ordered my car eons ago, but they still have not arrived from RCR.

At this point I feel I may have to fabricate my own, so information on mounting, parts, pictures of anyone who has them installed, etc. would be appreciated.
 
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Scott

Lifetime Supporter
Preston, I'm waiting for mine as well. My guess is that their fabricators have been really busy getting the Aero finished. I spoke with Fran today and he told me that they're working on them. Josh is going to send me some pictures of them installed on the 01 race car and I'll post them here when I get them. As far as I know you and I are the only ones that have ordered them... let us know if someone else has them. In any event, I need someone else in my boat!
 

Scott

Lifetime Supporter
I chose the SL sway bars because they appear well engineered and are cockpit adjustable. According to Fran, they take nearly 40 hours to fabricate. My plan is to connect them to linear actuators with integral position sensors. That will enable me to have a softer/firmer rocker switch as well as a couple of presets. Fran, it would be really helpful if you could provide the linear cable travel as well as required tension so I can start sorting out the linear actuators and control system.

Preston, Fran sent me a text from PRI. He has the parts for our sway bars and is working on it. So, I think we just need to push for a firm ETA.

Below are some pictures of the front sway bars. They are way more sophisticated than any splined bar solution I could come up with:
 

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I've just started looking for a fairly simple solution for semi-adjustable yet affordable bars, I feel the car needs them for anything more than slightly spirited driving on the road. Based on the photos above, I now see why it the car doesn't come with them and most don't both installing them. :/
 

Scott

Lifetime Supporter
Scot, I think you're confused with the "street" sway bars. They had fitment issues and were mounted under the chassis. I am aware of several builders who didn't install theirs. To my understanding, Superlite is working on redesigning them.

The "race" version is a different animal. If anyone has experience with them, I'd love to hear about it.
 
Scott -- good pics, thanks for posting. Good to know that you have heard something back from Fran. I look forward to getting my set too if they are now getting finished.
 

Howard Jones

Supporter
I would think twice spending money on a street ONLY use car version of antiroll bars. IMHO they are not necessary. These cars have so much grip, even on street tires, that You can't get the car anywhere cost to the adhesion limit. If you are driving that hard on the street........Well just don't.

A track car on the other hand will need to be driven at near 100% to begin to benefit from the chassis tuning that antiroll bars provide. On track day cars even may not need them. Full on wheel to wheel racing in of course a completely different deal.

Something to think about. Maybe wait unit you have the car done and sorted and then decide on the benefit of antiroll bars for your application.
 

Scott

Lifetime Supporter
Howard, I completely agree that these cars shouldn’t be driven anywhere near the limit on the street. My car will be street/track and they don’t have any undesirable effect when on the street (vs. something like the race splitter). They mount to foot box where the brake lines, clutch lines, etc. are typically mounted and with everything else I’m stuffing into the car it’s much better to have them early in the process.
 
I chose the SL sway bars because they appear well engineered and are cockpit adjustable. According to Fran, they take nearly 40 hours to fabricate. My plan is to connect them to linear actuators with integral position sensors. That will enable me to have a softer/firmer rocker switch as well as a couple of presets. Fran, it would be really helpful if you could provide the linear cable travel as well as required tension so I can start sorting out the linear actuators and control system.

Preston, Fran sent me a text from PRI. He has the parts for our sway bars and is working on it. So, I think we just need to push for a firm ETA.

Below are some pictures of the front sway bars. They are way more sophisticated than any splined bar solution I could come up with:

Guys i would to learn about these, does the flattish bar get twisted by the pushrod so that is either a horizontal flat bar that offers a preset amount of resistance that increases as the bar is turned to the vertical position, i have not seen a bar of this type before, are there any details out there that any one knows of that covers their design / calcs etc , fitting a linear actuator to a bar is something i am considering for my project.
Regards
Graeme
 

Scott

Lifetime Supporter
Lambo,

It's pretty cool that superlite offers them as an option... otherwise I wouldn't have known about them.Look at the pictures here:

cockpit adjustable sway bar - Bing images=

The adjustability is performed by pulling on the handles shown below (I assume the two handle version is for front and rear bars). Looks like 5 levels of adjustments with the handles having a max of 2x leverage. If a driver's going to be able to move them, then I can't imagine there is that much tension. In addition, those controls should give you a good idea of the max linear motion (not sure if all 5 positions are typically usable or not).

A linear actuator has the advantage of very fine grained settings and no need to put the levers in the cockpit if you're building a nice interior.
 

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I also havn't seen this type of adjustment method. I chased down all the parts though and it appears the rotating half cone has a 180 degree adjustment range. Rotating the cone will put the leg of the cone either inside (stiffer I assume) to, or anywhere between, further out (softer). Leverage on bar stays the same, but you can lengthen and shorten the bar length effectively. Longer bar= easier to twist given everything else the same.

Pretty good solution to a rather complex problem.
 
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