CAV Oil Pan Choices?

Sam Watson

Bronze Supporter
#1
Hi, I'm getting started accumulating bits and pieces!

CAV configured for RBT/ZF trans on order now and I'm researching SBF 347 requirements for my engine builder. I read here that Aviaid and Armando GT40 pans interfere with the lower cross member at the rear and require a chassis modification.

Seems easier just to buy a pan that fits. That leaves me with Canton Road Race 7qt, or possibly the Armando GT350R pan since the sump is shorter than the GT40 version. Are there any firm conclusions on this from CAV people? Other options? I will not be doing much, if any, tracking.

Thanks!
Sam
 

Pat

Silver Supporter
#2
Hi Sam,
At least on my CAV the under engine crossmember is directly under the engine mounts approximately 12 inches forward of the rear of the Ford 302 block. There the oil pan has about 4 inches of clearance to the crossbeam. My pan is a front sump so there a lot of room. That said, you should check with Johann of CAV USA to be sure about your particular car. I have a very early mono and my engine mount to crossmember distance may be different than a newer car.
 
#3
Cav#99 351 base engine & zf with modified oem ford pan drops right off. It has front sump and added section at sides with baffles etc........forever ford!
 

Sam Watson

Bronze Supporter
#5
Great, thanks for the info, guys. Veek, I have a long list of things to hit Johann with, but I appreciate hearing what the rest of you have to say! I don't have a CAV nearby that I can go look at :sad:

Randy, do you happen to know which Armando? Is it the #407 GT40 pan with the 14" sump, or the #405 GT350R with a 10" sump? Does it hang below the chassis at all?

Sam
 
#10
Pan choice is really dependent on the cars application. if its a road car pretty much anything will do providing there is ground clearance. As soon as you start thinking of the odd track days you have to consider something with a bit more oil control, perhaps a pan with trap doors . You are not long in a bend before the oil will leave the pick pipe and you are sucking air , even if the oil light never comes on those few seconds with dropped oil pressure is enough to pick up a bearing. Most of the after market pans are drag race units that are not designed to control oil in a turn.

Bob
 

Sam Watson

Bronze Supporter
#12
Bob, you speak truth! Been there ...



Yes, I know the Accusump rules in a track car. I am building a street car that may get tracked once in a while. I went to the 10 qt Aviaid road race pan on the 482 FE Cobra and it has several chambers in the sump. So that is why I am considering the SBF version of that, or the Armando. There are some old posts here where people discussed interference issues with the long sump on the Aviaid GT40 model.

Thanks for your responses,
Sam
 
#13
Those much touted accusump gadgets are good but with an engine at full chat they only hold a split seconds worth of oil so really there is no substitute for a well baffled ,trap doored sump and a windage tray.


Bob
 
#14
I have a pan(non CAV) that isn't offen mentioned. It covers the bases pretty well. Its flat base sits right at the bottom of the frame rails.









It handles the corners pretty well. I too have the 3 qt. Accusump. This is plumed into the return oil supply from my remote filter with a one way valve behind it. That insures it will flow to the engine and not backwards to the cooler. If that isn't enough, my remote filter adapter has 2 in ports and 2 out ports. In one of the out ports I have a T arrangement that goes to the oil gauge and to a low oil pressure cutoff switch. I have a cooler arrangement, so I have an external thermostat that slowly allows oil to go to the cooler til the oil warms up. Then it goes directly to the cooler.



The triggers for the Accusump and the cutoff switch have several pressures to choose from. The cutoff is set lower than the Accusump. If the pressure continues to drop from the Accusump the cutoff switch will cut the power to the fuel pumps saving the engine. The cutoff switch has a bypass switch that allows the fuel pumps to run when cranking.
Speaking of cranking, my start button is wired so that it spins the engine but it won't crank til the keyed ignition switch is in the run position. This feature allows me to get the oil pressure up before cranking if it has been sitting for a while. Food for thought.

Bill
 
#16
I think yes it was. The dry sumps need a pump to run it and I don't have the room on the front of the engine. I have about 1/2" of clearance up there from the bulkhead. Besides, I don't have the room for the reservoir either.
If you have a remote oil filter you will need most of the parts anyway(oil pressure sender for example). Mine has 4 holes so I had to fill them up with something!! The oil pressure cut off is like an oil sender unit, 3 wires is all. If you are running a cooler then you will need a thermostat. Mine lets a small portion run to the cooler til it heats up, then allowing full flow to the cooler. Then you will need a thermostat to turn the fan on. That screws right in to the oil filter adapter. The Accusump needs the one way valve so it flows in the right direction. The hardest part was the cutoff switch wiring.
I guess it is like building a house. Your wife want to add one thing and that means you have to get one to three other things to make it work!!

Bill
 

Sam Watson

Bronze Supporter
#17
Ah .. very creative bit of engineering, just use what's there! Starts up like a Cessna, press the starter, count 4 prop blades going by, then turn the magneto switch on ;)

Thanks for the insight!

Sam
 
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