Chuck's Jaguar D Type Build

Ian Anderson

Lifetime Supporter
Supporter
I have just seen in Facebook marketplace a set of 4 C type wire wheels for sale.
Seller is Bryan Jedinak

They look ok in the pictures.

Beach City OH

nothing to do with me but thought you may be interested

Ian
 
Chuck it’s all good your hardest mission going forward is parts I have been waiting 4 months for GM to get the ECM‘s produced for the LT4 everything I order is 12 to 14 weeks out even Vintage Air Products
 
Chuck it’s all good your hardest mission going forward is parts I have been waiting 4 months for GM to get the ECM‘s produced for the LT4 everything I order is 12 to 14 weeks out even Vintage Air Products
I just ordered a few needed parts to complete assembly of the drive train from three different suppliers. It will be interesting to see if there are supply chain problems.
 

Doug M

Supporter
Chuck, have you decided what type of restraints you’ll use and how you’ll install them? Lap belt? Shoulder belt? Four point harness?
 
Clutch Assembly, Part III.

More than two years ago, before progress was interrupted by construction of an airplane, a couple of posts discussed the hardware needed to complete the drivetrain and dialing in the bell housing. Now we are back to the Jag. First, we will address the flywheel and pressure plate. Second, we will address the bell housing. Finally, we will address installing the complete drivetrain in the Jaguar.

Gathering the parts already acquired revealed some needed parts that had been overlooked and some incorrect parts. Here is a revised and list of the needed parts. Corrected items are in italics; deleted items are lined through.

From American Powertrain:

1 Clutch kit – 9.5” clutch including pressure plate, disc, throw out bearing and clips.
3 Clutch dowel pins.
1 Pilot bushing
1 Lightweight billet aluminum flywheel, 133 tooth
1 Bell housing

From Moss Motors or Terry’s Jags:

1 Clutch s/c rod. (40) #C9798
1 Slave cylinder. (35) #C29801
1 Slave cylinder, early shorter version. #C1470
10 Flywheel bolts. #C4855
1 Gearbox fork. (2) #C9797
1 Cover plate, lower bell housing (15) #C41664
1 Clutch fork return spring (5) #C5120
1 Slave cylinder spring return anchor (6) #C5178
1 Fulcrum pin, to secure gearbox fork on shaft (3) #C1207352
1 Clutch release shaft (1) #C9857
1 Clutch – slave adjuster assembly. C24147ASY
1 Bolt, dog point fork to shaft. #C8011
2 Flywheel dowel. #C2313
3 Dowel pin, small, bell housing. #C13479
2 Ring dowels for starter mount plate. #c22489



From Summit:

1 ARP #150-330, pressure plate bolts (5/16”-18 x .780)
1 Clutch alignment tool, Pioneer Automotive, #TAT5317
1 Set of four transmission to bell housing bolts. (Confirm dimensions)


Here are the clutch and pressure plate parts.

IMG_1245.JPG

IMG 1245

The clutch fork was cleaned up and painted. The opening for the throw out bearing had to be filed on one side. Such inspections and “fixes” are a recurring issue with Jaguar parts.

IMG_7028.jpg
 
Clutch Assembly, Part III.

More than two years ago, before progress was interrupted by construction of an airplane, a couple of posts discussed the hardware needed to complete the drivetrain and dialing in the bell housing. Now we are back to the Jag. First, we will address the flywheel and pressure plate. Second, we will address the bell housing. Finally, we will address installing the complete drivetrain in the Jaguar.

Gathering the parts already acquired revealed some needed parts that had been overlooked and some incorrect parts. Here is a revised and list of the needed parts. Corrected items are in italics; deleted items are lined through.

From American Powertrain:

1 Clutch kit – 9.5” clutch including pressure plate, disc, throw out bearing and clips.
3 Clutch dowel pins.
1 Pilot bushing
1 Lightweight billet aluminum flywheel, 133 tooth
1 Bell housing

From Moss Motors or Terry’s Jags:

1 Clutch s/c rod. (40) #C9798
1 Slave cylinder. (35) #C29801
1 Slave cylinder, early shorter version. #C1470
10 Flywheel bolts. #C4855
1 Gearbox fork. (2) #C9797
1 Cover plate, lower bell housing (15) #C41664
1 Clutch fork return spring (5) #C5120
1 Slave cylinder spring return anchor (6) #C5178
1 Fulcrum pin, to secure gearbox fork on shaft (3) #C1207352
1 Clutch release shaft (1) #C9857
1 Clutch – slave adjuster assembly. C24147ASY
1 Bolt, dog point fork to shaft. #C8011
2 Flywheel dowel. #C2313
3 Dowel pin, small, bell housing. #C13479
2 Ring dowels for starter mount plate. #c22489



From Summit:

1 ARP #150-330, pressure plate bolts (5/16”-18 x .780)
1 Clutch alignment tool, Pioneer Automotive, #TAT5317
1 Set of four transmission to bell housing bolts. (Confirm dimensions)


Here are the clutch and pressure plate parts.

View attachment 124393
IMG 1245

The clutch fork was cleaned up and painted. The opening for the throw out bearing had to be filed on one side. Such inspections and “fixes” are a recurring issue with Jaguar parts.
 
Great to have you back on the Jag. Still waiting on my motor should be in the next 2 weeks:rolleyes:, I've decided to go with the Tilton hydraulic release bearing set up on my T5.
 
Clutch Assembly, Part IV

The flywheel has two pins in addition to the ten bolts. The two pins were put in the lathe and “polished” with 600 grit paper to assure there were no defects that would interfere with their installation. They are about .010 oversized. They were driven home with a hammer after first being placed in the freezer for a couple of hours. They were started into the flywheel on the bench to assure they started out straight.

The two pins can be seen in this photo. Note that they are threaded to assist in removal should that be necessary. Removing the flywheel would likely be a bit of a challenge which I hope never to do.

IMG_1234.JPG


Once the pins were in place the lock plate and bolts were installed. The bolts were torqued to 67 foot pounds and the nutplate flanges bent using a pliers. The entire flywheel was thoroughly wiped with brake cleaner to assure it was free of any dirt or oil.

IMG_1236.JPG


The clutch is located with three 0.25” pins. They were gently hammered in place. The pin openings on the clutch were undersized, so a 0.25” reamer was used to clean the openings. The fit was still tight but tightening the bolts brought it into proper position.

The alignment tool was set in place after grease was placed in the pilot bearing hole. The pressure plate was set in place, paying attention to putting it on in the right direction. Unlike some, this pressure plate does not have a “Flywheel” marking on one side.

IMG_1246.JPG


As the clutch housing was set in place the alignment tool was wiggled to assure the pressure plate remained centered. The clutch bolts from ARP are pre lubed and torqued to 25 foot pounds using a crossways diagonal pattern. Once everything was tightened free movement of the alignment tool was again confirmed.

IMG_1252.JPG


Grease will be applied to the shaft when the transmission is mated to the engine: our next project.
 
Bell Housing, Part I

Multiple issues had to be resolved with the American Powertrain bell housing.

1. The clutch fork rides on a 0.50” rod. Unfortunately, the inside diameter of the bronze bearings installed in the bell housing were significantly undersized. Further complicating the issue, the outside diameter of the bearings is oversized. So proper Jaguar bearings that come with the support shaft cannot be used. Finally, those incorrectly sized bronze bearing were held in place with tiny set screws that must have had a bottle of red LocTite applied: they were impossible to remove.

The problem was solved the using a .50” reamer to open the bronze bushings to the proper diameter for the clutch fork support shaft. The reamer was simply twisted by hand easily removing the soft bushing material. The fork moved smoothly once done.

IMG_1255.JPG

IMG1255

The clutch fork is held in place with a ¼” set screw: one of those details that would be easy to miss. Yes, we did use a bit of red Loctite on the set screw. A ¼” lock nut should also be applied.

IMG_1394.JPG

IMG1394

2. Jaguar used two different size slave cylinders on the XKE. Be sure to order the early / short version. Confirm that the bleed fitting and the fluid hose are on the correct sides.

The mounting points for the slave cylinder were machined about 1/16” too much resulting in the slave cylinder push rod being slightly out of alignment. Although it may not affect its function, we wanted it to align properly.

IMG_1397.JPG

IMG1397

It is a simple matter to add a couple of washers. The problem is the bottom contact point has a gap which needs to be resolved once the washers were placed. A ¼” hex head set screw was used. A hole was drilled and tapped. Its height can be adjusted to optimize the alignment. Red Loctite was used.

IMG_1407.JPG

IMG1407


IMG_1417.JPG

IMG1417

More issues to come.
 
Last edited:
Bell Housing, Part II

3. Unlike Porsche or BMW, anything Jaguar needs to be double checked for proper alignment. One of the springs that holds the throw out bearing to the clutch fork rubbed slightly against the bell housing. Some time was spent gently filing a bit of material from the bell housing to assure there would be no interference when the clutch was fully disengaged.

IMG_1401.JPG

IMG1401

4. The most significant issue was interference between the clutch fork and the transmission case. A call to American Powertrain revealed that they remove material on the transmission case to provide the needed clearance. Unfortunately, they forgot to make that modification on my unit. The issue is visible in this picture.

IMG_1288.JPG

IMG1288

Most of the material was removed with a hand file. It is a slow process, removing and replacing the bell housing to check progress. The goal was to remove as little material as possible but enough to assure sufficient motion. We won’t know if we accomplished that goal until it is fully assembled and, in the car.

IMG_1388.JPG

IMG1388

IMG_1393.JPG

IMG1393

The bell housing is ready to be mated to the engine.
 
Drivetrain Install

The bell housing was mated to the engine after confirming the two alignment pins were in place. The thin brass shim made a couple of years ago was used to assure proper alignment. The transmission shaft splines were greased with the material that came with the clutch. Grade 8 bolts were used, cut to the proper length per the spec sheets previously posted. Star washers were used per the Jaguar spec sheets. All bolts were torqued to spec.

We had some difficulty aligning the transmission to the bell housing, so the bell housing was removed and the transmission test fitted without the bell housing. It went together easily. By setting the bell housing in place and leaving the bolts loose, the transmission, bell housing, and engine came together. We concluded that the pressure plate was not precisely aligned due to the too – loose fitting centering tool.

IMG_2145.JPG


The starter was installed, using the two alignment bushings. Once the engine was lifted off the stand, the rear corner brackets were added on both sides and the lower transmission cover plate was installed using four ¼” nuts.

Long ago we described the addition of access panels on either side of the transmission tunnel to aide in installing the drive train. To our delight, we determined that the entire drive train can be set in place as one unit. Nonetheless I strongly recommend adding those access openings since issue will come up, like bleeding the slave cylinder.

IMG_2154.JPG

IMG2154

IMG_2153.JPG


With the drive train in place, we can measure and order the driveshaft. Closer to that first start!
 
Top