P1109, horror!!

#1
There were only 2 original GT40's this year Spa Classic.

There was Claude Nahums P1078 and there was P1109 (which can be discussed of being an authentic GT40).






And this is what was left of it after it crashed........

 
#2
Ouch. Very sad to see that.

I think that's why there seems to be fewer and fewer original GT40's actively racing. Crashing your multi-million $/Euro GT40 is a big hit.....and insurance doesn't cover it. A while back an original GT40 lost it's clamshell at a local vintage racing event in Seattle. I took a picture or two of it back in the pits and the owner freaked - just about slapped the smart phone out of my hand and made some weird comment along the lines of taking a picture of the damaged car could affect the car's value. Jeez, relax man - you took the car out into public so don't be surprised if the public takes a picture.

Once number 49 is fixed I hope the owner doesn't relegate her to the static display.
 

MHNCO

Lifetime Premier Supporter
#3
How many parts must be retained for this to be any different than my Superformance when it's all said and done? Those VIN plates must be worth a lot of money :)
 

Larry L.

Lifetime Premier Supporter
#10
My own answer (as if anyone cares- or should) to the question of whether an object that's had all of its component parts replaced remains fundamentally the same object or not is: "No". At that point, how could it be anything other than an exact reproduction?

A 'sort of' case in point is for sale here in the U.S....a 1966 RO51 A990 Hemi "lightweight" whose entire unibody has been replaced. Additionally, it's hard to tell from the way the sales blurb is written whether or not any-or-all of the car's components referred to as being "era-correct", "period correct" or "factory correct" are simply that, OR are the original components on the car when it left the factory. IOW, what are the odds that, say, the drivetrain components on a car bought for sanctioned drag racing wouldn't have been 'grenaded' and replaced at least once if not multiple times? (My guess is the car's suspension parts, lightweight door hinges and the like could be the ones actually on the car when it left the factory...but...?)

Additionally, from the way the ad is written, it appears as though the factory race headers on the car today weren't on the "original" car, but were bought 'after-the-fact' since the ad states, "...the super rare factory headers that cost the restorer 5-figures ..."

'Many questions... :embarassed:

1965 Plymouth Belvedere A990 For Sale | Collector and Classic Cars For Sale | RK Motors Charlotte
 

Larry L.

Lifetime Premier Supporter
#12
My own answer (as if anyone cares- or should) to the question of whether an object that's had all of its component parts replaced remains fundamentally the same object or not is: "No". At that point, how could it be anything other than an exact reproduction?

A 'sort of' case in point is for sale here in the U.S....a 1966 RO51 A990 Hemi "lightweight" whose entire unibody has been replaced. Additionally, it's hard to tell from the way the sales blurb is written whether or not any-or-all of the car's components referred to as being "era-correct", "period correct" or "factory correct" are simply that, OR are the original components on the car when it left the factory. IOW, what are the odds that, say, the drivetrain components on a car bought for sanctioned drag racing wouldn't have been 'grenaded' and replaced at least once if not multiple times? (My guess is the car's suspension parts, lightweight door hinges and the like could be the ones actually on the car when it left the factory...but...?)

Additionally, from the way the ad is written, it appears as though the factory race headers on the car today weren't on the "original" car, but were bought 'after-the-fact' since the ad states, "...the super rare factory headers that cost the restorer 5-figures ..."

'Many questions... :embarassed:

1965 Plymouth Belvedere A990 For Sale | Collector and Classic Cars For Sale | RK Motors Charlotte

...that should have been "...a 1965..."
 

wolodymyr

Bronze Supporter
#14
Very sad, and I agree with Ryan the car looked very nice, hopefully it will be repaired to the same standard.
With regard to the Ship of Thesus thing, I firmly fall in the doesn't matter camp. Since all of our cells are replaced since we first joined the forum, should we be made to re-register on the basis that we are not the same person as joined in the first place??:laugh: Nonetheless it is a moot point, and the debate will continue, forever, without any possible resolution, which is probably why I think it doesn't matter.:dead:
Dave
 
#15
How many parts must be retained for this to be any different than my Superformance when it's all said and done? Those VIN plates must be worth a lot of money :)
Maybe your question should be how much do you replace on your car before it is not a Superformance anymore???

only kidding!
 

MHNCO

Lifetime Premier Supporter
#19
I'm just glad these cars get properly raced and dinged up and in my opinion if you own the original VIN then you own the original whether there's a single part left that started life when the car first raced.
 
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