Question on SLC Brake and clutch lines

Joel K

Supporter
Hi,

I received these four pieces with my kit. I only need two and think thsee connect the clutch and the rear brake lines which ended in the middle of the spyder on the driver side of the car.

Thanks for the help.

8C58D58B-B22E-4816-BD12-FEEB532DD450.jpeg


Closeup...
87601EC0-30E6-4BBA-BCAE-13C88BED2504.jpeg
 

Scott

Lifetime Supporter
My brake and clutch lines weren't even close to fitting on the front half of the car (the rear half fit pretty... well until I changed everything). In any event, mine had the same unions in the middle of side pod. This would be OK for a track car, but it's a bad location if you're going to install a tub and seal the spyder because you won't notice a leak for a while and you'd have to pull the car apart to fix the leak. IMO you don't want anything in the side pod that needs to be serviced or might develop a leak.
 

Joel K

Supporter
Thanks Scott,

You read my mind, that was my next question. Doesn’t seem like a great idea to have these unions in that area. Sounds I’ll get a lesson in making flares.
 

Joel K

Supporter
BTW 45-degree double flare in stainless steel is a PITA. I bought this tool from Easton and it's amazing. You don't need it if you're going to use something softer, but it makes stainless easy to do. If you don't want to pick one up, you can send me a USPS label and I'll lend you mine.

https://www.eastwood.com/professional-brake-tubing-flaring-tool.html


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Wow Scott, That’s very nice. I may take you up on your offer. It will be a minimum 3-6 months before I really need to start using it so I will let you know. I would like to keep it all stainless and to use a really nice tool would be great.
 

Scott

Lifetime Supporter
Neil, I have heard that some people have had street cars fail inspection with AN fittings on hard lines. Specifically on some forums (including this one) and from a reputable shop that replaced the brake system for a car that failed inspection. That said, no one has ever pointed me to any regulation that disallows 37-degree single flares. I read through all of the federal DOT regulations that I could find and there was no mention of flares. I agree that 37-degree single flare (AN fitting) is a lot easier to make and that the there are nicer fittings available. I would have preferred to go that direction, but I didn't want to have a potential issue and tool mentioned above makes it easy to make the double flare. So all of my hard lines are 45-degree double flare and the flex lines are 37-degree single flare.
 
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Ken Roberts

Supporter
I’m redoing all my lines for the abs brake system with the nickel copper tubing. It’s a dream to work with and lasts a lifetime. I borrowed my friends hydraulic flaring tool as it does the BMW abs bubble flares and GM push connect fuel lines as well.
 

Neil

Supporter
Neil, I have heard that some people have had street cars fail inspection with AN fittings on hard lines. Specifically on some forums (including this one) and from a reputable shop that replaced the brake system for a car that failed inspection. That said, no one has ever pointed me to any regulation that disallows 37-degree single flares. I read through all of the federal DOT regulations that I could find and there was no mention of flares. I agree that 37-degree single flare (AN fitting) is a lot easier to make and that the there are nicer fittings available. I would have preferred to go that direction, but I didn't want to have a potential issue and tool mentioned above makes it easy to make the double flare. So all of my hard lines are 45-degree double flare and the flex lines are 37-degree single flare.
It seems that those AN fittings are acceptable to the FAA and the military for use in 1500psi (operating pressure, not burst pressure) hydraulic & pneumatic systems. Stainless steel AN fittings are used in 3000 psi systems. ??????
 

Scott

Lifetime Supporter
Neil, I completely agree. All of the regs that I saw dealt with pressure ratings, temperature and corrosion testing, etc... zero mention of the type of flare. However, logic doesn't always work when dealing with a bureaucracy ;-) I think AN is probably legal everywhere in USA, but maybe the inspector is having a bad day or doesn't like flashy cars or whatever... I decided to keep the brake lines old school to avoid any potential inspection issues.
 
Fudge!!! I spent at least $100 on extra brake lines already flared, had to bend them (not easy) . Per howards suggestion I changed the in line check valves for wildwood ones, that have different size fittings, so I had to reorder a 60 inch flared stainless steel line and bend it to fit. Broke one along the way. Tha was a royal PIA. Should have bought the stainless steel flaring kit to begin with. Scotts offer would have saved me tons of time and money. But now my lines are all done. No the prettiest bends but done. I am posting a new build thread today.
 

Joel K

Supporter
Fudge!!! I spent at least $100 on extra brake lines already flared, had to bend them (not easy) . Per howards suggestion I changed the in line check valves for wildwood ones, that have different size fittings, so I had to reorder a 60 inch flared stainless steel line and bend it to fit. Broke one along the way. Tha was a royal PIA. Should have bought the stainless steel flaring kit to begin with. Scotts offer would have saved me tons of time and money. But now my lines are all done. No the prettiest bends but done. I am posting a new build thread today.
Hey Hector, we exchanged a few posts back in 2018 when we were waiting for our kits. Yes, please post some pics of your build. I always enjoying seeing how everyone approaches their build.
 
Got the pics posted , but all the pics are sideways. I will figure out later. I have an appointment with my oncologist in a few minutes .

Good to hear form you again. I need some help!!!
 
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