Stack's Active Power GT40 Build

Hey Mark,

Awesome build so far! I have a few questions as I am planning a active power kit right now...

The first few are on your brakes.

Would you be willing to share the part numbers for the brake parts you ordered?

Did you order the pedal kit from Chris and plan to hook it up to the wilwood master cylinder?

What wheels are you running? I have heard that the halibrand style wheels have a very tight clearance to aftermarket brakes and require a spacer. Just curious what you did for this. I also heard that 18" wheels are required at a minimum.

Regarding your transaxle choice...

Did you buy a turbo 996 box or the standard? Do you have any upgrades planned to help it hold the power of the coyote?

Thanks in advance!
Nick
Brakes are easy. Wilwood makes direct replacement for the corvette. Fronts are SLC56 and Rear are DPC56. These allow you to change the stock 2 piston front and single piston rear into 4 piston front and rear. These brakes do require a 17" rim. The parking brake is a drum in disc style and is reused. You may be able to use a 15" rim if you buy 2 sets of rear calipers, and replace the stock corvette uprights with aftermarket lowering uprights. Chris is looking into this option.


I did not order the pedal kit from Chris but used pretty much the same parts he uses. I had some of the items left over from a previous build. He supplies Wilwood clutch and brake peddle assemblies and throttle peddle if requested. I am using a coyote so I needed the electronic peddle provided in the ford racing control pack.

Wheels. I am running BRM style wheels from Imagewheels.co.uk I had them made to the specs Chris gave me. He provides Halibrand style wheels with his roller kit and they are made to fit his chassis and the corvette brakes. My car goes back to him for the body in a few weeks, and he will look at my wheels and see if they can be an optional item in his roller package. No spacer was required, and don't think chris uses one either.
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Transaxle. I used the standard 996 gear box. I could not find one with limited slip so once the car is up and running i will pull it out and send it to californiamotorsports.net for upgrades. I think it will live under normal street driving. I don't plan to race or autocross with the car.

stack
 
After test fitting the engine for interference issues I began working on the cockpit aluminum. The Active Power chassis uses 1/8" aluminum panels to fill out the cock pit space and isolate the driver and co driver from the engine compartment. These panels are silicon glued in pace and riveted with 3/16 rivets.
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The radiator assembly is supported by these triangle shaped panels. I added the bottom panel to stiffen things up and make the bottom of the car smooth for better air flow.


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Rob Twine

Supporter
Mark, looks like your are making great progress. I have spoken with Chris over the past few years and hopefully will be starting a build in the near future. I have the suspension pieces and am building my engine at this point. The chassis construction looks very similar to the process of building the Factory Five cars which I have built (Cobra and Daytona Coupe). Similar use of aluminum panels, riveted and silicone adhesive. Don't skimp on the silicon, it really helps cut down on the resonance of the aluminum panels. Also, great job on the use of the cleco fasteners! I never understood the guys that seemed to think they had to place one in every hole!
 

Neil

Supporter
"I never understood the guys that seemed to think they had to place one in every hole!"

It guarantees that all the holes line up before you try to insert a rivet. You don't have to place a Cleco in 100% of the holes, just remove one to place a rivet and put it in another hole further down the line.

BTW, CherryLock or Huck Magna-Lok blind rivets can increase the structural integrity of the chassis.
 
"I never understood the guys that seemed to think they had to place one in every hole!"

It guarantees that all the holes line up before you try to insert a rivet. You don't have to place a Cleco in 100% of the holes, just remove one to place a rivet and put it in another hole further down the line.
I tend to fit them "all" when drilling or wanting the full alignment then remove all but a couple. It is possible with only a couple to have some misalignment. For that reason as well you should "clock" these type of clecos rather than line them up all in the same orientation!
 
look forward to your build. Just curious as I’m considering an active gt40, does active cars come with an MSO Or is it just a bill of sale?
thanks
Joe
 
For the fuel system i optioned for the fuel tanks that chris fabricates. I had him add a trap door similar to what an oil pan has to prevent all the fuel from sloshing forward during braking. The fuel pump sits in the driver side tank and is a internally regulated Aeromotive Phantom unit. This pump also has a baffle and foam bladder to keep fuel at the bottom of the pump. The passenger side tank has a cross over hose to the driver side. This fuel system should be adequate for a street car that will not see any track time.
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stack
 

Russ Rittimann

Russ Rittimann
Supporter
Mark -- I like the Aeromotive Products fuel pump assembly you used. My fuel tanks have no baffles in them at all. I was going to add 4-5 baffles along the length with the one at the rear having holes a bit further up to hold the fuel for the pickup. Having a trap door sounds like a better idea. Do you by chance have a picture of the baffle with the trap door that Chris provided? Nice build BTW.
Thanks -- Russ
 
I used a moroso oil pan for this project. Originally designed for the Factory Five Cobra replicas it fits the build nicely. Part number is 20570.

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Russ Rittimann

Russ Rittimann
Supporter
Thanks Much. Pretty simple, should be able to incorporate something similar into the rear-most baffle to hold the fuel.
-- Russ
 
For the fuel system i optioned for the fuel tanks that chris fabricates. I had him add a trap door similar to what an oil pan has to prevent all the fuel from sloshing forward during braking. The fuel pump sits in the driver side tank and is a internally regulated Aeromotive Phantom unit. This pump also has a baffle and foam bladder to keep fuel at the bottom of the pump. The passenger side tank has a cross over hose to the driver side. This fuel system should be adequate for a street car that will not see any track time.
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stack
Nice setup. What sending unit you using? Are you running a low pressure crossover pump?
thanks
 
Nice setup. What sending unit you using? Are you running a low pressure crossover pump?
thanks
I am not using a crossover pump. I had bungs installed in both tanks near the very bottom. I then connected the tanks together with a 10an hose which should allow both tanks to level out. I installed a vent in both tanks, and i can fill from either side as well. I don't have a good picture of it, and it is buried behind the seats. The sending unit I picked up on Amazon. I measured the tank depth and found one that would work. I made sure the ohm reading was compatible with my speedhut gauges.

stack
 
I’m enjoying your build. I’ve been scrutinizing the photos for the last hour. I’m building a mid-engine chassis from scratch using C5 control arms and spindles also and the toughest part is finding accurate measurements for the vertical distance between the lower and upper control arms’ pickup points (bushing centerline). It looks like the upper arms front and rear sit level and the lower arms front and rear have a small degree of angle for anti-dive and anti-squat. Is there any way you can help me out with this? Thanks in advance.
 
That would be amazing. Ideally I would use a plumb bob and level to measure the vertical distance between the upper and lower control arm pivot points. But since I will have quite a bit of adjustment built in, I just need to get within an 1/8” or so. Even if you could just hang a tape measure approximately plumb and eyeball it. I just need one measurement for the front and one for the rear. As long as I know which holes you measured from, I should be ok. Measure from the UCA mounting hole to the the LCA mounting hole.
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