THE new 351

#2
I guess that solves all the talk about puny 347 motors now doesnt it. These motors take a really long connecting rod. Rod stroke ratios go out the window until you go to the large end of the scale. And no one here would do that would they?
 

Jac Mac

Active Member
#3
Added a few explanations for those who might be confused or wondering about some of the Text. Interesting that they intend to bring out a version without the steam venting later this year which will possibly allow a bore size of around 4.25".

Then with a 3.75 stroke & a 6.58 rod plus a 1.040" pin height piston we can have a genuine 427 Windsor. All that remains is convince someone like BT to cast us up some FE style heads that bolt on a Windsor along with a cam with lobes placed accordingly & we have the ultimate GT40/Cobra kit car motor.........

Is it just me or does that block bear a lot of similarity to a D..t or others out in the market already.........
 
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#5
If Caterpillar made them, that would be reason enough to stay away from them. From my experience with marine diesels, Cat's casting expertise is far from good. They are famous for porous blocks and leaks between the oil and water passages. Now if Cummins were making them, THAT would be a plus. Or Deere. Anyone but Caterpillar.
 
#6
If Caterpillar made them, that would be reason enough to stay away from them. From my experience with marine diesels, Cat's casting expertise is far from good. They are famous for porous blocks and leaks between the oil and water passages. Now if Cummins were making them, THAT would be a plus. Or Deere. Anyone but Caterpillar.
I have the same experience with cats pin holing liners on 3208's in buses
 

Jac Mac

Active Member
#8
If Caterpillar made them, that would be reason enough to stay away from them. From my experience with marine diesels, Cat's casting expertise is far from good. They are famous for porous blocks and leaks between the oil and water passages. Now if Cummins were making them, THAT would be a plus. Or Deere. Anyone but Caterpillar.
Thats amusing , when I worked with Ford the biggest disaster amongst many was the Cummins in the D1000 series trucks particularly in relation to 'cavitation erosion' which was the tech term of the day in relation to pin holes etc in sleeves, blocks, heat exchangers.
While the older John Deeres are great you wont find too many people that like the modern versions -after- they have paid for a mech major, particularly in regard to the alloy trans case, and one of the more successful race trucks worldwide is CAT powered & parked up less than 20 mile from me. We had some USA racers out here for SFOS a few years ago & pulled it out of the shed & fired it up, they were pretty savvy on things mechanical & it would normally take a bit to impress them, but I still remember one remark....'' Now thats a Hot Rod ''.
 

Randy V

Administrator
#9
I've not heard that Cat did the blocks for Ford - where was that information from?

I hope it's not the case.. Read on...

I have the same experience with cats pin holing liners on 3208's in buses
I had a Cat 3126 in my motorcoach... :thumbsdown: Bloody thing went through a gallon of coolant every 3-500 miles.. Never could get Cat/Freightliner to admit there was anything wrong with it.. :furious:

Finally after 4500 miles of nothing but grief from not only the engine but the chassis and bodywork of that POS Coach - I finally let the bank have it back.. Cost me plenty but it gives me the right to tell the world what a POS Damon assembled using their own shoddy body work, shorting out electrical system, Freightliner Chassis and the Stanley-Steamer Caterpillar 3126B engine... The only friggen thing that was NOT pure crap was the Allison MD transmission.
Okay - rant over... :lipsrsealed:
 

Jac Mac

Active Member
#10
Found a better pic, cross drilled steam vents can be 'seen' in lower set of 'triangle' water holes between each pair of cyls.
 
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#11
When you guys questioned cats reliability I had to recheck my info. I found one site that said the blocks are cast at the powerstroke factory in Indianapolis. Dont know if thats totally true or not because you can write anything on the internet. Sorry if I caused anyone to have a (power) stroke.
 

Randy V

Administrator
#12
Good info Jac.... I've a lot of hope for this block...

Egoman - thanks for the update! We'll keep our eyes peeled.. I've a pal that works in Robert Yates engine shop. I'm going to ping him and see what he knows..
 

Jac Mac

Active Member
#13
Only reading between the lines here: Guessing!.... the text stated that the block is cast from 'Diesel' grade material. Now IIRC Fords light truck diesel motors..'Powerstroke'... lineage goes back to International. I have not kept up with 'who owns who' in latter years, so there may be some merit in egomans post.
 
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Jac Mac

Active Member
#18
Just what I thought. I think that rules it out for me but nice to know if it is a good thing though.

Ross:thumbsup:
Yes, but I doubt anyone on this site is likely to put one thru its paces in the short term, might have to wait for some feedback from short track or jet boat racers in particular, if its got any inherent problems they will find it.
 

Randy V

Administrator
#19
Just what I thought. I think that rules it out for me but nice to know if it is a good thing though.

Ross:thumbsup:
I do happen to have a pair of billet manifold adapters to put a 289/302 intake on a 351w.. :) Also the distributor extender on an MSD distributor..

Jac's right about short-track and jet boats.. In both, the engines see a lot of continuous high RPM use. That's where you'll see the parts that make it and those that don't...
 

Jim

New Member
#20
Talked to an engineer on Ford Racing's hotline, and Ford considers their new Boss 351 block to be a work of art. He said, this block is very sturdy. Ford has dyno tested this block to 1200 horsepower and not a problem. The Boss 351 block (9.5 inch deck height), is available from Ford Racing in iron or aluminum. Check out fordracing.com engine blocks
Ranger Jim
 
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