What do I do 1st?

Ok, I'm ready to actually start building my SLC Superlite. I have it disassembled and cleaned up and of course I've been ordering parts in preparation... Now, what do I do 1st? Do I start installing heat shielding and sound dampening or do I start building, then take it all apart and do heat shielding and sound dampening after I know where everything will go? I don't want to screw up the very fist step! Any help would be appreciated!
 
First and foremost, if you haven't done it yet, is to do a complete inventory of the kit and its parts. This helps make sure that all the parts on your invoice are accounted for as well as getting you acquainted with what some of those pieces are.
 
I would suggest you plan out where and how you want your sound and heat shielding materials to be positioned and install them AFTER you’ve done the majority of building in each particular area. It’s a PITA to be cleaning your drills and taps if you have to go through that material. You might not be able to position a bracket flush against solid metal or have to come back and remove damping (also a real PITA).

If you haven’t already, check out my build at SoCalSLC.com. The posts are numbered and most of it is in chronological order. There’s also a Table of Contents button if you’re looking for specific information quickly; it’ll direct you to all the pertinent posts I made for that specific area.

For instance I have a section dedicated to sound and heat materials with links - 10 total. You could read all 10 and see everything from start to finish in my build, then follow/adjust based on your goals.


Best of luck! The board is a great resource and the build threads here served as my primary reference when building my car.
 

Bill Kearley

GT40s Supporter
No need to have a firm plan as you will put together and take apart several times. When you think it's the last time it won't be. Install the one chance stuff like sound proofing when you know it won't be a pain down the road.
 
First and foremost, if you haven't done it yet, is to do a complete inventory of the kit and its parts. This helps make sure that all the parts on your invoice are accounted for as well as getting you acquainted with what some of those pieces are.
I've sorted everything and have read the build manual and watched every video on youtube and watched every build thread. Even with all that, I'm nervous to take the first step and goof it up. I built a FF Daytona, but it's very different from the SLC chassis and process.
 
The manual has a suggested build order, IIRC.
I would suggest you plan out where and how you want your sound and heat shielding materials to be positioned and install them AFTER you’ve done the majority of building in each particular area. It’s a PITA to be cleaning your drills and taps if you have to go through that material. You might not be able to position a bracket flush against solid metal or have to come back and remove damping (also a real PITA).

If you haven’t already, check out my build at SoCalSLC.com. The posts are numbered and most of it is in chronological order. There’s also a Table of Contents button if you’re looking for specific information quickly; it’ll direct you to all the pertinent posts I made for that specific area.

For instance I have a section dedicated to sound and heat materials with links - 10 total. You could read all 10 and see everything from start to finish in my build, then follow/adjust based on your goals.


Best of luck! The board is a great resource and the build threads here served as my primary reference when building my car.
Hi Cam,

I've read and watched your entire build log as well as all your videos. You did an AMAZING job! I know you spent alot of time on the heat and sound. I was hoping you would comment.

Ok, so I will take your advice and lay things out, drill holes, mount the inifinity boxes and overflow/surge tanks and then take it apart and do the heat and sound materials. I'm very fortunate that I live in Ct. I've become friends with Allan and visited his shop 3 times this summer for his advice and guidance. I hate to bother him too much, so I wanted to post this and get some opinions.

I think I'll re-read your build log again. You did an incredible job of documenting everything.

I've got a million questions, but, I will save them for another time.
 
If you built a factory five Daytona, you should no problem with the SLC.

I would say start with whatever you want to to start with, just start. :)
 

Howard Jones

Supporter
First thing. Post you location in your profile!!!!!!

It's now so much in what order you do things you will take it apart many times as you go forward. Having said that keep in mind that the car you build will be something that you will need to maintain for many years. Think a lot about how you will be able to work on it later. Things like nuts located deep behind the bodywork where you can't reach it without taking everything apart should have a nut plate installed instead of simply putting a nut on the backside of a panel.

Or where to locate large components like fuel pumps. Put it where it not only will work correctly but where you can get it out of the car without taking the body off or apart.

Generally speaking I would say to assemble the big stuff first. Put the power train in the car with the suspension, exhaust system, steering, fuel tank, radiator, AC big parts, interior big parts (seats, steering wheel, peddle box, and shifter) then complete their systems one at a time like the cooling system big plumbing, then the brake system tubing, fuel system parts and their tubing and hoses and the other mechanical systems first before you go on to the electrical systems.

Once you have the car put together (all the big stuff is in less electrical) do a alinement of the suspension and trial fit of the body parts and get a feeling for what your questions will be. Do the headlight and tail light mounting systems but wait on wiring for now with the exception of connector clearance on the back of the lights themselves.

Body: The windshield will determine the location of the center section and NOT the other way around along with the front and rear wheel arches and tire clearances. You need the final wheels and tires for this. The door fit will come next in order of importance after the DRY windshield fit/ center body section placement and their relative relationship to the front and rear body sections as related to wheel arch tire clearances.

Do whatever it takes to be able to DRY fit the windshield without ANY deformation of it. NONE NONE NONE!!!!! Make the center section mounting method repeatable in respect to being able to take it off the car and put in back on and then dry refit the windshield perfectly a couple of times.

Now you have a center section that can be removed and put back and the windshield will fit every time. This is a big deal but not a hugely difficult thing to do from a technical standpoint. Just a bit of patience and a lot of trial and error. The doors are the same process, patience and trail and error.

Lastly on the body. Overall it goes like this, the center section goes on with the windshield fitting in the recess near perfectly, then see where you are with the front and rear wheel arch locations and the tires. Now go on to the doors and trail and error the total pieces fitting at the same time not disturbing the windshield fit. What every you did to the body parts to get to this point is the shape of the parts but not the surface finish part of the work. You can do that now or at the end of the build. I sanded the body and did the majority of the body surface prep at this point and got the car in a 80-90% finish with all of the mounting points and hardware location and selection done and spray can sand able primer coated.

Now you can take the body off and complete the car systems do electrical and get it to the go cart stage. Once it runs (large R) and the systems check out the body can be final trial fit and finished for paint, removed again for paint and put back together for the last time. Now final fit the windshield. It should drop right in at this point.

You can see why I insist on all that fitting and checking the windshield throughout the process. It didn't fit now you would REALLY be fucked. It CANNOT be made to fit. It will not flex period.

Hey...……..your done! congrats!!!!

I am sure I missed something or others will have their own better ideas. Just keep asking questions and find the nearest SLC owners to buddy up to for beer drink help and new friendships.
 
First thing. Post you location in your profile!!!!!!

It's now so much in what order you do things you will take it apart many times as you go forward. Having said that keep in mind that the car you build will be something that you will need to maintain for many years. Think a lot about how you will be able to work on it later. Things like nuts located deep behind the bodywork where you can't reach it without taking everything apart should have a nut plate installed instead of simply putting a nut on the backside of a panel.

Or where to locate large components like fuel pumps. Put it where it not only will work correctly but where you can get it out of the car without taking the body off or apart.

Generally speaking I would say to assemble the big stuff first. Put the power train in the car with the suspension, exhaust system, steering, fuel tank, radiator, AC big parts, interior big parts (seats, steering wheel, peddle box, and shifter) then complete their systems one at a time like the cooling system big plumbing, then the brake system tubing, fuel system parts and their tubing and hoses and the other mechanical systems first before you go on to the electrical systems.

Once you have the car put together (all the big stuff is in less electrical) do a alinement of the suspension and trial fit of the body parts and get a feeling for what your questions will be. Do the headlight and tail light mounting systems but wait on wiring for now with the exception of connector clearance on the back of the lights themselves.

Body: The windshield will determine the location of the center section and NOT the other way around along with the front and rear wheel arches and tire clearances. You need the final wheels and tires for this. The door fit will come next in order of importance after the DRY windshield fit/ center body section placement and their relative relationship to the front and rear body sections as related to wheel arch tire clearances.

Do whatever it takes to be able to DRY fit the windshield without ANY deformation of it. NONE NONE NONE!!!!! Make the center section mounting method repeatable in respect to being able to take it off the car and put in back on and then dry refit the windshield perfectly a couple of times.

Now you have a center section that can be removed and put back and the windshield will fit every time. This is a big deal but not a hugely difficult thing to do from a technical standpoint. Just a bit of patience and a lot of trial and error. The doors are the same process, patience and trail and error.

Lastly on the body. Overall it goes like this, the center section goes on with the windshield fitting in the recess near perfectly, then see where you are with the front and rear wheel arch locations and the tires. Now go on to the doors and trail and error the total pieces fitting at the same time not disturbing the windshield fit. What every you did to the body parts to get to this point is the shape of the parts but not the surface finish part of the work. You can do that now or at the end of the build. I sanded the body and did the majority of the body surface prep at this point and got the car in a 80-90% finish with all of the mounting points and hardware location and selection done and spray can sand able primer coated.

Now you can take the body off and complete the car systems do electrical and get it to the go cart stage. Once it runs (large R) and the systems check out the body can be final trial fit and finished for paint, removed again for paint and put back together for the last time. Now final fit the windshield. It should drop right in at this point.

You can see why I insist on all that fitting and checking the windshield throughout the process. It didn't fit now you would REALLY be fucked. It CANNOT be made to fit. It will not flex period.

Hey...……..your done! congrats!!!!

I am sure I missed something or others will have their own better ideas. Just keep asking questions and find the nearest SLC owners to buddy up to for beer drink help and new friendships.

That is absolutely great advice. I will follow it exactly. I've already visited Allan 3 times as we are both in Connecticut. He's been a huge help. I've also connected with Joel and plan a visit in August to see his car. I used to be a General Contractor. We always built around the things that cannot be changed ie: shower stalls, kitchen sinks, staircases etc. So I get the importance of working around the windshield. I really appreciate the time and thought that you put into your answer.

I'm not as concerned about body and suspension and drivetrain as I am about my cooling system, intake and dry sump. I've never worked with a SBC and I have an NRE Alien intake which has it's own engine management system and affects the placement of my waterneck. So I have to do a remote thermostat. And... the dry sump scares me too. I've never installed one of those either.

I guess I will deal with those challenges as they arise. I hope there are some people out there who can offer advice once I actually get to those systems.

Thanks again for the GREAT advice!
 
Best piece of advice USE A REMOTE MOUNTED WATERPUMP. Seriously. In my car, partially because of the Supercharger every square inch of space is used up in front of the engine. When the pump fails, the engine gets pulled.

Too late for me, not for you.
 
Best piece of advice USE A REMOTE MOUNTED WATERPUMP. Seriously. In my car, partially because of the Supercharger every square inch of space is used up in front of the engine. When the pump fails, the engine gets pulled.

Too late for me, not for you.
Wow... I have a meziere belt driven pump installed now. I have an Alien Intake and it blocks the traditional waterneck option for a SBC. There is a an-14 outlet which I assumed I could plumb in a remote thermostat. The lower hose is totally accessible. The firewall has already been modified to fit the pump. Its just the plumbing that worries me. Would you still recommend a remote pump?
intake 9.JPG
 
Wow... I have a meziere belt driven pump installed now. I have an Alien Intake and it blocks the traditional waterneck option for a SBC. There is a an-14 outlet which I assumed I could plumb in a remote thermostat. The lower hose is totally accessible. The firewall has already been modified to fit the pump. Its just the plumbing that worries me. Would you still recommend a remote pump?
My hoses are accessible, but when the pump fails the engine has to come out. Same as most of these builds. If you can get the pump off the front without moving the engine, you are golden. Being a stickler for ease of service, my car would have had a remote mounted electric pump in it had I thought of it way back.
 
Ok... I'm going to start researching tomorrow. I totally get it! I can tell you this... I don't want to take my engine out after I have this thing built!

Thanks again!
 

Howard Jones

Supporter
Allan has done more doors than anybody and I would defer to him on that and on street car fit and finish. His experience is priceless. You're luck to have him nearby.

As far a water system goes, at this point if I was doing it all again I would use two electric pumps. One on the inlet to the radiator in the nose and the other at the inlet to the engine in the engine room. This was the recommendation I got from the race department at Steward racing pumps and they have done P2 type prototypes in this fashion. It's not the cheapest way to do this but I think it would be the best.

I still may add a second pump to my car. It works pretty well at this point but I am pretty sure it would be golden with a second pump in the nose

Two pumps half the distance the pumps are required to transfer coolant and do a much better job of keeping the pressure up in the system. The length of the plumbing in a mid engine car is the main design problem for a heavy power demand usage car. I.E. track car or hot weather high power car on the street.

Two of these:

 
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