Intake manifold for Gurney SBF

Ron Scarboro

GT40s Supporter
Supporter
Intake Manifold needed for Gurney Eagle engine.

I have an intake manifold, but it is unfortunately a porous casting. I've tried to seal it, without success. Does anyone know a source for either a one piece, or 3 piece intake manifold?

Thank you,

Ron Scarboro
 

Neil

Supporter
Ron, back in the Can-Am days, we used Loctite 290 to seal our McLaren magnesium wheels. We applied it to the inside of the wheel rim using a paintbrush. This stopped air from leaking through the porous castings.
 
I don’t know what you might have used already to attempt to seal your intake.

I’m retired from the electric utility industry and there’s a coating used in that line of work to seal
damaged porcelain insulators. I have learned recently that it also works in high-temp Engine
applications as well.

It’s called “Glyptal” and the specific type is the 1201/1201A Red Insulating Enamel.
Eastwood has it. Glyptal has very specific instructions for it’s surface prep and use.

Might be worth a try to save what I’m sure is a pretty pricey/rare Manifold !

*Good Luck*

Ray
 

Neil

Supporter
I don’t know what you might have used already to attempt to seal your intake.

I’m retired from the electric utility industry and there’s a coating used in that line of work to seal
damaged porcelain insulators. I have learned recently that it also works in high-temp Engine
applications as well.

It’s called “Glyptal” and the specific type is the 1201/1201A Red Insulating Enamel.
Eastwood has it. Glyptal has very specific instructions for it’s surface prep and use.

Might be worth a try to save what I’m sure is a pretty pricey/rare Manifold !

*Good Luck*

Ray
Ray, most of the other Can-Am racers used Glyptal to seal their magnesium wheels; we used Loctite 290. Both worked very well.
 
Neil wrote:
Ray, most of the other Can-Am racers used Glyptal to seal their magnesium wheels; we used Loctite 290. Both worked very well
Interesting that it was used on mag wheels, Neil…

I know from experience that Glyptal performed well in electrical applications, and that’s in high-voltage situations, 24/7 and in any type of weather, so it has been tested. Their site says it withstands 135 degrees C (275F) continuously “for months on end”.

Although I have no experience with it in automotive engine applications, it sounds like pretty tough stuff.

Well, hopefully it could work on Ron’s manifold…
(sorry for the bit of thread-drift!)

Ray
 
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