Anybody know what this cylinder head is from??

It's been a while since I posted here gents - been a bit of a difficult time for my family. Both my parents passed away (peacefully) earlier this year.

In addition to being a champion sailor and avid paraglider, my dad was a real car guy. Mostly into European stuff, particularly Italian. He had lots and lots of Fiats, Alfas, Ferraris, Maseratis, Lancias, along with a bunch of interesting Porsche, Peugot, Citroen, Jag, MG, Rolls, Lotus, etc. He had some really funky stuff like Crosleys and Austin and Osca. At one point the number of cars was in the hundreds. He was able to afford all this stuff because he was an inventor of OSB (organized strand board) and waferboard, which are both cheaper substitutes for plywood and used worldwide.

Probably the rarest car he had was a 1939 Alfa 6C 2500. In the early 1990's and 2000's he would drive it around town, to the marina, to the hardware store, etc. But his favorite fun car to drive was a Fiat 600 - he loved them, including the one he and my mom bought new in 1958 at the start of their 65 year marriage (see pic - keeping that one).

There are three locations where he stored his cars and had shop facilities - here in the PNW, San Diego and Hawaii. I'm now faced with the task of sorting out and selling most of this stuff...cars, project cars, engines, transmissions, stacks of parts, etc. Most of it I recognize from being around it all over the years.

A few parts and pieces I just don't recognize however. Anyone know what these cylinder heads are from? There's five of them laying around.

If anyone can ID this it'll be you guys - the smartest automotive guys I know...

Thanks!

ps. if anyone wants an Alfa, Lancia, Fiat, etc. project cars let me know!
 

Attachments

  • cylinderhead2.jpg
    cylinderhead2.jpg
    223.7 KB · Views: 213
  • cylinderhead3.jpg
    cylinderhead3.jpg
    374.8 KB · Views: 220
  • shopbench1.jpg
    shopbench1.jpg
    343.1 KB · Views: 212
  • fiat6001.jpg
    fiat6001.jpg
    292.5 KB · Views: 195

Markus

SPRF40
Lifetime Supporter
Found it, I think.....

OSCA Twin Cam Engine
OSCA1600GT_10.jpg


 
Thank you. Yes, that's definitely it - OSCA twin cam. That makes sense....my dad has/had a bunch of OSCA's. There's a 1600 Zagato with no engine....so I'm guessing the block is around. One of the heads was obviously rebuilt so that's probably what was going to go back in.

Thank you!
 

Brian Kissel

Staff member
Admin
Lifetime Supporter
Cliff, welcome back to the forum. Sorry to hear of the passing of your parents. My Mom will be 97 at the end of the month, and still had her wits with her. From the posts above, it looks like you asked in the right place. Good luck with your ordeal of taking care of your father’s collection. I wouldn’t wish that on anyone . And thanks to your Dad for the OSB. I just bought 125 sheets.

Regards Brian
 
Will be plugging along with this car/garage sort out project for some months. Worse things to be doing with the spare time!
 

Trevor Booth

Lifetime Supporter
Supporter
hi Cliff sorry for your loss , OSB board is a great invention I have used it in many applications , it has been known as Orientated Strand Board or Waferweld in Aust.
regards
 

Charlie M

Supporter
Sorry for your loss Cliff. Your Dad sounds like he was an amazing guy. Good luck with the sales; I hope you have many fond memories as you go through his collection.

Charlie
 
Quick update here gents. I've spent a ton of time going through automotive stuff - cars, parts inventory, whole facilities basically. I've sold a lot of nice cars this year...over 50 so far. Last week the 1939 Alfa 6C was sold to a very well known collector. The car had a very interesting history. It was owned by Charlie Chaplin. After Charlie died in the late 1970's my father acquired it from the family. The cost was minimal. Back then nobody really cared too much about a clapped out 40 year old (at that time) Alfa Romeo.

Unfortunately, I've had to fend off a lot of "barn find" folks who try to find neglected/forgotten cars and then flip them for a profit. This kind of activity adds nothing to the vintage car hobby. Rather, it just wastes a lot of people's time and adds unnecessary expense to the ultimate car enthusiast buyer.

I've done a lot of organizing of an extensive parts inventory stretching over 70 years in acquisition. British, Italian, French, German stuff. There are some motorcycles too. There's an Indian Chief my grandfather drove around in with my grandmother in the side car. There's an old Vincent my dad drove around in England in the early 1960's. There's a 1962 R69S BMW I gave my dad for his 65th birthday.

I'll keep chipping away at it all. Like to get back to completing the Frankenlotus.
 

Brian Kissel

Staff member
Admin
Lifetime Supporter
Very interesting stories Cliff. Your Dad was a very lucky man to have acquired such interesting cars. Sounds like he had a very full life.
Regards Brian
 
Yea, those guys are like buzzards. But as distasteful as we find them, they do provide a service. If no one sold to them and no one bought from them, or they lost money on enough transactions, they would go away.
 
Back
Top