Registration of a new build GT.

Hello there, having recently bought a GT I now have to get the thing registered. Can someone advise what's involved. Sim
 

Chris Kouba

Supporter
Hi Simon and welcome.

A little more info would go a long way toward getting some help- what's your location? What are your regulations and requirements?
 
Yes of coarse, silly of me Chris. UK based (Warwickshire south). My car is all built up and is running but absolutely no documentation papers so have set about getting registered. I know I have to go onto the DVLA site but wondered if someone has advise on the pitfalls Swansea have in store for me?
Sim.
 

Brian Magee

Supporter
Hi Simon,
If your car has not been registered before it will have to go through an IVA test. To pass it will have to conform with a lot of regulations. When it passes you will be given a certificate which the DVLA will need before it can be registered. If you have no bills for the main parts of the car it will be registered with a 'Q' plate. Search IVA on this forum or google it.

Brian.
 

Mike Pass

Supporter
A complete description of what you have will help. Without knowing details of age, spec, build etc. any advice will be very difficult as there are so many aspects to the IVA test. The test is fairly straightforward but you need to prepare for it to avoid issues. I have helped to get three 40s through IVA and the inspectors are fair and helpful. Being thoroughly prepared is key.
Cheers
Mike
 
Will I be informed as to what is expected prior to the inspection? Its a build that has been a long term project & as for as i am aware the car will not come with receipts showing evidence of components used in its build. And no its not fallen off the back of someones pickup.
Sim.
 

Mike Pass

Supporter
The pre inspection information is the IVA book which you can download from the DVLA website. For the IVA test you present the car and a pack of documents. These are then checked over and the inspectors fill in a standardised form with sections which are filled in by the inspectors and then either a pass notification or a list of fail points is given. Only the fail points are addressed on a retest.
Without any information about the car any points of issue will be impossible to highlight. A lot can be found retrospectively from chassis and part numbers etc.
Cheers
Mike
 
Hi Simon, can only echo what Mike has put, he was one of the main members of my team that helped get my car through IVA could not have done it without them. I would also suggest reaching out to Mark Edwards he went through exactly the scenario you are facing.

Regards

Nick
 

Eddy McClements

Supporter
I have acquired the Terry Drury car.
Wow..congratulations! What a stunning machine. Surely that's got to be the closest thing to stepping into a brand-new, 1968 GT40. You are very fortunate indeed. Please share photos of your car as and when you have time....it is a lovely thing.
 

Mike Pass

Supporter
For road registration I would suggest that avoiding a Q plate is essential as they are like the "black spot". As the chassis is a Ford original and has many original parts it is essentially a historic vehicle. I would suggest speaking to Ronnie Spain who will know the vehicle well.
To get the car on the road some areas of the car will need to be altered or changed. The megaphone exhaust is "unlikely" to pass the noise test. Many cars now use a ring clamp system immediately after the collectors so that megaphones and silencers can be easily changed as required.
The tyres are not road compliant but a set of Avon cr6zz of a suitable width can be fitted. It would be useful to know the casting code on the block as this will help in determining the block age. This will determine the emissions level. For a pre '75 block the emissions requirement is "no visible smoke".
E marked plastic windows are now available. Rear view mirrors with an adequate angle of view are available. Fog lamps and reversing lights can be fitted. An anti theft system can be fitted. A suitable means of screen delisting can be fitted. The screen will need to have E marking. A handbrake system will have to be fitted. etc.
The FIA compliance should be easier as it has many original parts and period correct new parts.
Cheers
Mike
 
Thanks for this steer Mike, Ill see what the authorities have to say & if its at all possible to gain an age related logbook/plates then Ill have a go. Its a bit of a ghost car I suppose. Mr Spain has already given judgement as to the chassis & so unless anyone knows differently it is what it is. Yes there are a lot of original components on this car. Everything appears to be period correct & well put together. I will have someone do a history check on every thing that is there. It certainly has a presence. I don't think the colours great & the rear body is extra wide (14"wheels) so its not so sleek as the earlier cars (my view). And your right Eddy it is the closest anyone's going to get to a new GT40 (with chunks of original parts) as far as im aware & that is why I got it.
Sim.
 

Eddy McClements

Supporter
Hi Stephen - Thanks...I saw all the pre-sale photos and auction pics, just wanted some more photos now that Simon has his grubby mitts on the car! :)

My view is that there are two separate hurdles:-

1. IVA - this is simple (no, really!)...go through the car with the IVA compliance manual in one hand and your tools & tape measure in the other, and make sure that everything meets the required standards.

2. Registration - I think you can legitimately claim that, apart from the engine (which is old, but fully reconditioned), the rest of the car has been made from new, period-correct parts. The chassis may have been fabricated in 1968, but it never been used before. Likewise suspension, brakes, wheels, transmission, bodywork...which makes it a new car and like many completed kits on here you should aim for a new 2020 registration. You're allowed one second-hard but fully reconditioned part (the engine) and still achieve a new registration.

Good luck!

Eddy
 
Top