0-2920-0 MPH in 400 seconds

Tim Terry

Supporter
First stage was really rough in the cockpit. Lots of vibration and shaking - crew was more or less along for the ride. Second stage was very smooth. During the last couple of minutes of powered flight, the acceleration was incredible. Had to throttle down the three engines not to exceed 3-Gs on crew for the last minute or so. That's about 100 feet per second per second of acceleration, for those counting.
 

Larry L.

Lifetime Supporter
My gutless self would doubtless 'have issues' were I to take a ride like that.

Nooooo thank you...!
 

Tim Terry

Supporter
We often had to hit a very specific velocity at Main Engine Cut Off (MECO). They were in the range of 25,950 fps - almost 5 mi/sec. And we hit them routinely, within a few fps. A couple of hundred fps over and you weren't in the correct orbit (overspeed). A couple of hundred under - you were coming home unless you performed some extra burns.
 

Ian Anderson

Lifetime Supporter
Supporter
We often had to hit a very specific velocity at Main Engine Cut Off (MECO). They were in the range of 25,950 fps - almost 5 mi/sec. And we hit them routinely, within a few fps. A couple of hundred fps over and you weren't in the correct orbit (overspeed). A couple of hundred under - you were coming home unless you performed some extra burns.
How many times did you go up?
we visited Kennedy Space centre last year and The boosters were impressive, but not as serious as the Saturn5 ones.

ian
 

Neil

Supporter
How many times did you go up?
we visited Kennedy Space centre last year and The boosters were impressive, but not as serious as the Saturn5 ones.

ian
Ian, I was at the US Army Ordnance Guided Missile School at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama in the spring of 1961. One Saturn rocket engine was fired on a test stand there and it literally created a small earthquake. The ground shook and its noise was heard for miles; it was impressive.
 
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