C8 Corvette Transaxle

Good morning everyone. I have been counting down the days with anticipation until the new C8 Corvette was officially released. Having owned a corvette before, naturally I am a big fan and couldn't contain myself the moment the president of GM drove the car on stage. The Z51 performance package that was shown on stage comes with an 8 speed automatic dual clutch transaxle (DCT) with paddle shifters that helps get the vette to 60mph in under 3 seconds. For everyone that uses the LS series of engines, I imagine that it will bolt up quite nicely; however I wonder how everyone thinks it will fit in the SL-C. From the reveal it looks pretty compact to me, but the design is super complicated and there is a lot going in inside the transaxle. According to Hagerty, there will be two clutches, two power input paths, two gears for every forward speed along with their synchronizers, plus three gears to implement reverse. Pretty crazy. Down the road when i am finally able to pull the trigger on my own SL-C, i have planned on using the V8 Graziano with 1.038 drop gears, but depending on the cost of this transaxle it might be pretty cool to actually try this new option and be different. I know the gated shifter with the Graz has such a great feel and is probably a bit lighter but an 8 speed paddleshift sure does sound nice, especially with all of the traffic I am always having to contend with on the road. What are everyone else's thoughts on this? Here is the patent and design layout of the transaxle. Looks like it might fit to me!
 

Attachments

Cody another option would be the HGT corvette trans axle they have just released, 1000 ft lb rating, not sure on price though but can find out quick enough
cheers John
 
Re the corvette Trans axle from HGT here is a pic to wet appetites
HGT Corvette trans axle.jpg


specs to come
There will be a mid engine trans axle available soon, also 1000 ft lb rated
cheers John
 
I'm guessing the biggest hurdle will be the electronics. The transaxle operation is going to be tied directly to engine function.....and my guess is that the only way to get it to work would be to have the ENTIRE electrical system from a C8.....or wait for GM to come out with a crate engine/transaxle package option.

Not much different than when they came out with the LS3. You could buy an LS3, but you could not buy the ECU to actually make it run. The only option was to use a C5 ECU and tear the engine down to convert back from a 58 tooth reluctor to 24 tooth.
 
Bah, be a manly man and stick a built 930 transaxle in there. Bestest transaxle ever. Weighs next to nothing, can be built to handle infinite torque and you don't really need more than 4 gears anyways.
 
That’s exactly right.

With everything that’s tied into the can-bus, you’d find yourself with unexpected items like a second instrument cluster and door handles in a box in your trunk (as the conventional-to-DFI Cayman conversions found) to get it to all function correctly if you tried to convert with a donor.

Even if you got all those sensors transferred over, you’d have to make sure they were calibrated correctly so that the traction and stability systems sent the all clear. Without it, it’s likely there’s a reduced power or rpm mode the motor/trans gets locked into. As I understand it, chassis-specific measurements factor into how the traction control works - so those measurements or ratios of those measurements would need to be the same, or tricked, or disabled without throwing something else off down the chain.

I don’t see Chevy ever offering this to the aftermarket due to complexity... and if they did it’ll be 10 years down the road.

I'm guessing the biggest hurdle will be the electronics. The transaxle operation is going to be tied directly to engine function.....and my guess is that the only way to get it to work would be to have the ENTIRE electrical system from a C8.....or wait for GM to come out with a crate engine/transaxle package option.

Not much different than when they came out with the LS3. You could buy an LS3, but you could not buy the ECU to actually make it run. The only option was to use a C5 ECU and tear the engine down to convert back from a 58 tooth reluctor to 24 tooth.
Everything was better with 70s alloys and machining technology!! ;-)

Bah, be a manly man and stick a built 930 transaxle in there. Bestest transaxle ever. Weighs next to nothing, can be built to handle infinite torque and you don't really need more than 4 gears anyways.
 
The last two sentences in this paragraph are promising.
The gearbox that ended up in the Corvette is a DCT designed and built by Tremec. It's meant to be quicker than a human but just as engaging. It also takes a page from the Graziano gearbox used by McLaren. The paddles are directly wired to the gearbox, there's no middle man. The car doesn't second guess you.
 
Best bet would be if GM Performance will release it for the aftermarket. They’ve done so with the automatic C7 ZR1 (selling both engine and trans together as a package). There’s no reason to believe they won’t do the same with the C8 Corvette DCT.
 
People in the UK have managed to get the Porsche PDK dual clutch box to work behind an LS in the back of an Ultima, and offer a package for builders.
 
Top