Chuck's Jaguar D Type Build

Chuck

Supporter
Front Brakes, Final Installation

The modifications and installation of the front brakes were noted in posts in May, 2020. The final installation was finally completed.

The socket bolts that came with the kit were used along with a drop of red Lock Tite. They were secured without using a torque wrench, since the brackets are aluminum.

The brake lines are Russell DOT approved, 16” long with a 90 degree angle on one end. Part number #655242, available from Summit. The fit perfectly and completed the project.


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Chris Kouba

Supporter
I need to master a Lathe / Mill. It will be a steep learning curve since I have no experience.
I'm no master, but if I can do it, you certainly can. And you don't need to start as a master. Just work your way into it- there's plenty I still don't know how to do, but you're only beaten if you stop trying.
 

Brian Kissel

Lifetime Supporter
The only negative I can see to the above post is, Saw dust absorbs the much needed oil that's on the gibs and ways. If the ways are not properly protected from this, the wear will be accelerated. Proper cleaning and preventive maintenance will be required to maintain good tolerances.

Regards Brian
 

Chuck

Supporter
The only negative I can see to the above post is, Saw dust absorbs the much needed oil that's on the gibs and ways. If the ways are not properly protected from this, the wear will be accelerated. Proper cleaning and preventive maintenance will be required to maintain good tolerances.

Regards Brian
Pierre and Brian: would Delrin be a good material to practice with? Soft, no saw dust, hopefully not too expensive?
 
Watever material will need some practice ;
Each material need not only diferent machining speed ( say RPM) but also tools profile and how many material you grind off at same time
Soft material like Delrin or POM need hight RPM and deep profile cut on facial or radial tool ( this will give you bad habits and feeling because
too easy to machine with no noise or temperature dissipation)
Aluminium is machined differently too , than steel and at the end Stainless is very very specific and have to be tested when really you have some
expertise
On a lathe one best start is aluminium with a diameter of 2 inches max and using only manual progress ( say no automatic drive of anysort - longitudinal and facial)
A good test ( young mecanical students test !!) is (once the good tool is selected and fit properly at the centerline of the lathe) to take out 0,8 mm from diameter with 500/700 RPM and usemanually the longitudinal wheel to puch regularly the tool giving a long long "chip" that will not brake for minimum 40 mm long machining distance
repeat this and try until you rich good aspect surface diminuing each time the amount of material taken out ; then do similar test on facial surface
Most important is to be used with those manual movments to be sure 1/ not to hot the part you are machining 2/ not to make it "flying" over by penetrating too much or too quickly ( this will happen using automatic driving when someone is not teached about various set up needed to introduce on the lathe gears and driving threads bars)
Otherwise it is also advisable if you get a lathe to have someone who knows this tool ( and machiningprocess) to teach you in similar way a car teacher will show a student to drive ( seems to be stupid advise but this will prevent surely "stupid injury" )

Hope this help and good luck ( using a lathe or a mill is something very "enjoyable ")
 

Chris Kouba

Supporter
I would also echo Mic's comments. The material won't be analogous so the only thing you'll get out of it is validating the shape. Don't be afraid to commit and just use your final material. Couple of caveats or suggestions (from an amateur) though:

1 - Find a place which has rems available for cheap - I have a local place which deals with cut offs and scraps, but ends up having billet and slab along with extrusions and tube available at a reasonable price. It's easier to bin something if you didn't pay a kidney for it.

2 - Buy supplies ahead of time - I knew I eventually wanted to mill an A/C bracket. When I saw a big piece of alu billet at the place mentioned above, I bought it even though I didn't have the bracket in my head yet. When I find decent pieces there, I grab them knowing I'll get around to using them (to a point- I haven't been back there in a while, but I do still have some billet and slabs hanging out in the shop).

3 - Make a cobbled together piece with scraps of stuff - Gets you a tangible thing to take measurements of off and visualize. Like I did in this post: https://www.gt40s.com/threads/rcr-40-31.20158/page-11#post-318793

4 - Use that cobbled bit to make a drawing - Even a basic drawing is fine but for me, using Sketchup helped me consider tool paths.

5 - Think ahead - It's like a chess match, you need to keep the end goal in mind and sequence your cut paths to always have a square datum to reference. Takes a little while to think about t, but evidence is directing me to think that you're a pretty smart guy.

Based on your prior efforts, you'll do fine with this. I'm no master but feel free to ask questions off line if you don't want any more thread drift from this lovely D-Type build thread.
 
The only negative I can see to the above post is, Saw dust absorbs the much needed oil that's on the gibs and ways. If the ways are not properly protected from this, the wear will be accelerated. Proper cleaning and preventive maintenance will be required to maintain good tolerances.

Regards Brian
you don't really get sawdust as you get strings of wood as far as the lathe is concerned. either way a good cleaning and lubing regimen is paramount.
 

Brian Kissel

Lifetime Supporter
Chuck, as several have stated, get some scrap material and practice. You tube is also your friend. just at the end of the day clean the machine and it will give you years and years of service.

Now back to your build thread. Sorry for the drift, but I think several important things were brought up.

Regards Brian
 

Chuck

Supporter
Wow. This is great advice, thanks all. I look forward to experimenting with aluminum and perhaps delrin. I have already been watching You Tube videos - there are a ton of them.
 
Regarding lathe choice, I would suggest you look at older USA made machines as the quality is much better than anything out of China. The downside is the machine will probably exhibit some bed wear leading to backlash in the feeds ( ex college/school machines might avoid this). A digital read out will sidestep this problem and also avoids having to peer at worn out scales
 

Chuck

Supporter
Regarding lathe choice, I would suggest you look at older USA made machines as the quality is much better than anything out of China. The downside is the machine will probably exhibit some bed wear leading to backlash in the feeds ( ex college/school machines might avoid this). A digital read out will sidestep this problem and also avoids having to peer at worn out scales
Good suggestion, and one that has been made by other. Problem is space. I have very little room for a lathe/mill and seems the domestic machines tend to be bigger and heavier.
 

Chuck

Supporter
Of the smaller US made lathes I would recommend Hardinge, say a DV-59 for example.
Thanks for the tip. I took a look and that would be an option, except I need to get a lathe and mill in about the same space, which means a combo tool. I know those are frowned upon, but my space is really limited.
 

Chuck

Supporter
Question: are there any good basic references for getting started with a mill / lathe? Perhaps a 'Milling for Dummies' sort of book? Looking for some basic guidance such as RPMs used with different material, blade / bit set up, and the like. Not too technical. I have watched a ton of videos, but a paper reference would be nice. Michel's good suggestions above are the sort of basics I hope to explore.
 
Just look there for a quick start

Then just look at your friend "goouugl" with words like" Machining on a lathe " and you will find books !!

Have done a try and found already 1 book and 3 adds for others ( just do same browsing to find US books !! :D )
 
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