Enging Hoist Pickups

Randy Folsom

Supporter
What do you recommend for engine hoist pickups? I have seen folks using the corners of the intake manifold, carburetor mount holes, and the ends of the heads. I would like to ‘install’ the pickups because I expect to have to set the engine multiple times. Ideally, the pickups should allow for lifting the engine with the intake, exhaust, alternator and A/C, and the Quaife Transaxle with bell housing along with the engine. I am thinking the ends of the heads, but I am concerned about the A/C and alternator mounts.
 
I fabricated 2 plates with 'rebar loops' that bolt to the ends of the heads and allow easy lifting. Add a strap around the bottom of the trans to accommodate that. Also use a load leveler with the hoist to make balancing easier.
 

Randy Folsom

Supporter
I fabricated 2 plates with 'rebar loops' that bolt to the ends of the heads and allow easy lifting. Add a strap around the bottom of the trans to accommodate that. Also use a load leveler with the hoist to make balancing easier.
Thx for the guidance. I just ordered a load leveler. I will head out to the metal supply store next week for some 3/16 plate to make some brackets. I’ll use #8 grade bolts with anti seize to hold them on the aluminum heads.
 

Howard Jones

Supporter
I have lost track of how many times. Oh, and you need one of these. One man, one hand gearbox install. 50 bucks worth of material.
 

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Sean S.

Supporter
This is how I lifted mine. The ratchet strap gave me the little extra I needed to get it perfect. Notice I needed to bolt it to the carb mount lifting plate as the chains were too long to use there.
 

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Randy Folsom

Supporter
This is how I lifted mine. The ratchet strap gave me the little extra I needed to get it perfect. Notice I needed to bolt it to the carb mount lifting plate as the chains were too long to use there.
Thx for sharing. I considered getting a Cherry Picker, but they take up a lot of space. I am finding that the chain hoist allows for fairly precise Z axis adjustment. I will use a chassis dolly to accommodate X and Y axis alignment. I plan to install hooks at all four corners of the heads which will be left in place. With those hooks and a load leveler I should be able to tilt align the engine. I might install a rail and dolly on the garage ceiling so I can move the hoist.
 

Howard Jones

Supporter
If you plan carefully you can simply hang the chain house in the right spot from the ceiling, and place the car under it sitting on its tires. Then hoise up the engine/grbx as a unit until it clears the chassis. Once you have it clear, roll the car forward and out of the way. Now the power unit can be set on a dolly or roll away table etc and moved to the location you will work on it.

If you don't have fore-aft room in the garage then the car can be placed on those 4 caster dollies and moved sideways out of the way in the same manner.

Sometimes an overhead rail and hoist dolly takes up more vertical room than you have or is just more complicated than necessary. I have my chain hoist mounted from a steel piece of flat stock (3X16ishX1/4) hanging from a 2X12 up in the attic that crosses 8 joists on edge to spread the load. The 2X12 is braced with 6 pieces of angle iron to keep it from being pulled over on its side. The steel mounting tab is sticking down through the drywall with a nice big hole in it to hang the chain hoist from. It was a bit of work but very strong as well as not costing very much to do.
 

Neil

Supporter
If you plan carefully you can simply hang the chain house in the right spot from the ceiling, and place the car under it sitting on its tires. Then hoise up the engine/grbx as a unit until it clears the chassis. Once you have it clear, roll the car forward and out of the way. Now the power unit can be set on a dolly or roll away table etc and moved to the location you will work on it.

If you don't have fore-aft room in the garage then the car can be placed on those 4 caster dollies and moved sideways out of the way in the same manner.

Sometimes an overhead rail and hoist dolly takes up more vertical room than you have or is just more complicated than necessary. I have my chain hoist mounted from a steel piece of flat stock (3X16ishX1/4) hanging from a 2X12 up in the attic that crosses 8 joists on edge to spread the load. The 2X12 is braced with 6 pieces of angle iron to keep it from being pulled over on its side. The steel mounting tab is sticking down through the drywall with a nice big hole in it to hang the chain hoist from. It was a bit of work but very strong as well as not costing very much to do.

I simply used a cheap Harbor Freight hoist to raise the engine & G-50 up and set it into its mounts in the chassis.

Engine Installation 3.jpg
Engine Installation 4.jpg
 

Randy V

Moderator-Admin
Staff member
Admin
Lifetime Supporter
Interesting design on that Cherry Picker’s main arm. Presumably to keep the hydraulic cylinder closer to the lift.
This is the one I bought about 25 years ago and it still serves me faithfully. Now that I don’t have a big enough shop, it sits outside along with my 20 ton press.
20200715_160015.jpeg
 
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