Ken's SLC build thread

Dan Carter

Supporter
I had the same cost issue. As a technique, I elected to use white and at the terminal ends I used permanent marker in colors and strips to aid in differentiating wires. Just another way.
 

Neil

Supporter
Ken, I think the time will come that you will wish that you had used different color wiring. Tracing all the same color wiring is time consuming and frustrating.

eBay is a good source for mil-spec wire such as M16878/ , a PTFE stranded silver-plated copper wire. It has a 200C temperature rating. There are places such as
https://www.ebay.com/itm/12-AWG-16ft-Mil-Spec-Wire-M16878-4BLE5-PTFE-GREEN-Stranded-Silver-Plated-Copper/143285110943?hash=item215c75489f:g:FhoAAOSwYpVc0QF7

TXL is an excellent alternative. There are sources for TXL wire in assorted colors and gauges.
 

Ken Roberts

Supporter
Not at all Neil.:rolleyes: In all my years of doing diagnostics I usually use the connector ends. Very rarely did I need to know the color of the wire. The factory shop manual shows the pin assignments for all the connectors. Our $2000000 Locomotives did not use wire colors. If it was good enough for them then I'm happy with doing it the same. I know the wiring intimately since I built it all myself. ;)
 

Brian Kissel

Lifetime Supporter
Neil, I work on machines every day that have hundreds of wires in them. 90% of them are 2 colors. Each wire is numbered. They are in a much tougher environment than what these cars will ever see. Most of these machines run 24-7. On the rare occasion, we have a wire issue, we can easily track it down with the numbered wires. Ken, once again you have done a nice job keep it up.

Regards Brian
 

Neil

Supporter
No criticism intended, Ken. Just my recommendation. I've done all-black and color-coded wiring. Soldering all black wires into a 128 pin Amphenol connector was not fun. Each wire had to be identified with an ohmmeter.
 

Neil

Supporter
Rich, those white wire bundles have each white wire marked with a wire number every six inches or so to identify them. That's an alternative to color coding but an expensive one unless you are manufacturing in volume.
 

Ken Roberts

Supporter
Added the finishing touches to the the tail lights before mounting them. I added epoxy to the shaved corners to fill the voids and then added a bead of silicone around the perimeter to help guarantee a water tight seal. There is nothing more embarrassing then seeing tail lights with water sloshing around in them and these are "after market" quality lights (Eagle Eyes brand). The covers received a bead of epoxy at each rivet nut.
 

Attachments

Ken Roberts

Supporter
The nose of the car always seemed to be on a slant down (side to side) towards the drivers side as shown in this picture. I verified it by taking a measurement with a steel ruler resting on the square aluminum tubing and measuring up to the bolts that mount the vertical supports at each side of the foot box. The passenger side holes in the front wall of the foot box were spaced at 2"and 4" above the square tubing. The second picture shows the spacing on the drivers side. The holes are spaced at 1 11/16" and 3 11/16". Taking measurements of the difference in heights of the vertical nose plates from one side to the other also confirms the same thing. Pretty upsetting that I have to disassemble everything to repair this. Not happy at all having to do this. I read recently that someone with a GT-R had the same problem. The factory should be using a jig to locate these holes as it's important for the fit up of the the body parts (splitter and nose bodywork).

Can anyone else confirm what their measurements are?

Look closely at the top of the vertical plates and at the front upper suspension arm steel U brackets. You can see that the drivers side is lower by almost 3/8". I took measurements three different ways and they all confirmed the same thing. Check yours!

IMG_2732.JPG
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Scott

Lifetime Supporter
Two other options for adding identification to your loom.

(1)Buy a multi-color package of heat shrink tubing and cut them into small pieces, Very cheap and easy to do.

(2)Buy an Ident Kit from someone like RaceSpec (show below). This costs more but every piece comes pre-printed with an identifier.

99621
 

Roger Reid

Supporter
Ken Mine are not symmetrical either. The drivers side is lower than the passenger side. I believe the left and right side aluminum pieces are not cut the same.IMG_0577.jpgIMG_0578.jpg
 

Ken Roberts

Supporter
Roger I have removed the vertical supports and put them back to back on a flat service and they appear to be a mirror image..

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Ken Roberts

Supporter
I have drilled/tapped both sides to a 7/16"x20 thread. (yes...it's overkill) In my opinion the anemic 1/4" button head fasteners are not adequate given the load at the end of the vertical walls (the radiator and condenser, headlights and hood). Manitoba requires me to have some kind of bumper at the front. Here is a picture of the new fasteners assembled with red loctite so I hopefully won't need to reach in the foot box for the bolt head in the future. Both sides are now equal as shown in the pictures.
 

Attachments

Ken Roberts

Supporter
It will not have any affect on the door or body. It will cause the nose/splitter/radiator to be raised slightly on the drivers side. I hope it wasn't designed like that. It wouldn't make sense. You want the underlying structure to be square. The splitter mounts to this structure and then the nose mounts to the splitter.

With my car, the splitter was visually lower on the drivers side. This is what lead me to sight the frame work from a distance.....then it became obvious to me as shown in the picture. Mind you, my measurements were much worse than Johan or Rogers. It's something that you can verify yourself now. If your splitter is parallel with the top of the foot box...you are golden and don't need to worry. It's hard to tell with the splitter though because they are not perfectly straight.
 
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