Kurt H (hoffkm) SL-C build thread

I also installed my replacement fan shroud after helping Hector out by selling him my original. Bolted right into the same holes of the other one.

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The stock fans that came with my kit are rated at 1,730 CFM each.

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The do need "feel" like they are pulling that much air. Plus, with everything I read and know, I have no idea how these could pull that much air and only draw 6.6 amps.

I am open to others past experience with these or similar fans. My current plan is to try using them and if they prove inadequate switch out to either a pair of Mishimoto, Maradyne, or SPAL fans.

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Thanks Joel, you provided a good concept, I just copied it. Our sheetmetal vendors at work do a great job.

I used this same supplier when I was restoring my wife's GTO. They made up some drain gutters for me that you cannot purchase new for the convertible top mounting area. I could not find a donor car to cut up since this area was specific to the 66 GTO and they made less than 12,000 of them new. I had to reverse engineer the mostly missing gutters and re-construct the entire are as well as the panel between the trunk lid and the rear window.

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Jury is still out as to which I prefer working with, sheet steel or fiberglass. As itchy as fiberglass is I HATE rust more.
 
Looking good Kurt! Those 3D printed cooling hose brackets are sweet. Very clean.

Out of curiosity, how is it going vs. your Microsoft Project timeline? (It was too blurry when I zoomed in to see individual tasks etc...). Obviously we do this for the fun of it so time taken is second!
 
Looking good Kurt! Those 3D printed cooling hose brackets are sweet. Very clean.

Out of curiosity, how is it going vs. your Microsoft Project timeline? (It was too blurry when I zoomed in to see individual tasks etc...). Obviously we do this for the fun of it so time taken is second!
Ben,

My MS Project schedule has been a "living and breathing" document. I have changed it many times but as of now the end date is still the same. The biggest change I have made to my build plan is that I have adopted Bill Phillips concept to get the car on the road unfinished and debug it before paint, interior, etc. By mid summer 2021 I should have the car assembled and on the road to drive and test thru the rest of the summer. I will then take it back apart in the fall for bodywork, paint, interior, etc. With Covid cancelling so many events (car shows, county fairs, etc.) I have extra time to work on the SL-C, that is helping me stay on schedule.

Yes, I am doing this for fun but the engineer in me needs a schedule/plan.
 
I also installed my replacement fan shroud after helping Hector out by selling him my original. Bolted right into the same holes of the other one.

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The stock fans that came with my kit are rated at 1,730 CFM each.

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The do need "feel" like they are pulling that much air. Plus, with everything I read and know, I have no idea how these could pull that much air and only draw 6.6 amps.

I am open to others past experience with these or similar fans. My current plan is to try using them and if they prove inadequate switch out to either a pair of Mishimoto, Maradyne, or SPAL fans.

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I thought a lot about the fans and radiator, Howard got an upgraded custom radiator, that is always an option, my plan is like yours, try out the stock fans and see how it goes, being in West Texas it has been 107 all weekend, I am a little nervous about high engine temps at idle , we will see, we can always share notes and come up with solutions. team effort,
 
Once the heater box was installed I mounted the Stanceparts pneumatic lift cylinders onto my front shocks. I had to modify the top spring cap of the shocks to spread the load out over the top of the Stanceparts cylinder instead of it simply being support by the locknut on the shock shaft.

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The Stanceparts pneumatic lift cylinders work with the stock springs as they only add about 3/8" to 1/2" to the overall installed height.

Next I moved on to the brake and clutch lines, nothing fancy here, just tweaking the bends in the lines here and there and fastening them down.
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And I got a start on the coolant tubes and the heater and AC hoses.
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Passenger side is complete. I think my routing and 3D printed brackets turned out pretty good. It is a shame all this will be covered up and no one will ever see it.

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Ran out of time to finish the drivers side.
Kurt:
The hose routing is pretty awesome , the 3d printed brackets are beautiful, shame that they will be covered, I should have done that, my son is really good with the 3d printer, so good old fashioned hose clamps will do for me.
cutting the a/c-heater housing is a brilliant solution, would have saved me a ton of headache. Also gives you more room for routing hoses, you did not have to use the bulkhead fittings and the hoses stay up high in the footbox. I should wait and follow your lead from now on LOL!!. I did come in from the driver side with a long bolt and went into the driver side front bracket thread for extra support plus the other 3, 2 supplied in the back and one custom in the front passenger side. Just curious, how did you bend the copper tubes so well with so little room? did you remove them?
Also you having the tub in place made me realize there is more room than I thought for the hoses, I have them very tight together, more than needed.
Amazing how other builders humble you with brilliant solutions. Good job Kurt, you have been busy!!! you make me feel super slow.
 
Hector,

Thank you for the compliments, I do not really consider that I am moving quickly, I’d love to have time to make more progress.

I will be using bulkhead fittings to route the heater and AC hoses into the interior, just have not got them installed yet.

I very carefully bent the copper heater core tubes by hand with a close fitting rod inside the tube to act as a mandrel to keep it from collapsing. I did not remove the heater core.

I may have made more room but I still cannot seem to get my hoses routed in a way I like without linking them at the heater core. It will mean adding more joints and leak paths but I am bending some 5/8 aluminum tubing to route the lines inside the tub from the bulkheads to the heater core with short, straight ends of hose connecting them. I can bend the tubing with a tighter radius than the hose.
 

Dan Carter

Supporter
Kurt

Don't see that you resolved the fan choices. I went with the Mishi. See Dan's Build 364-366. They work great. A bit noisy, but I only hear the engine anyway. They push a ton of air. Temp in GA stays around 200 with Air on. I like the low AMP draw.
 
Kurt

Don't see that you resolved the fan choices. I went with the Mishi. See Dan's Build 364-366. They work great. A bit noisy, but I only hear the engine anyway. They push a ton of air. Temp in GA stays around 200 with Air on. I like the low AMP draw.
Dan,

I have already read your build log about your fan choices and I am leaning towards the Mishi fans if the stock proves inadequate (unless someone convinces me to not wait for the inevitable). They are not rated much higher than the stock fans but I do not believe the published rating for the stock fans after testing them on my radiator. Wish I had anemometer to do some scientific problem solving.-----------Just checked Amazon, I may be purchasing a cheap one just to try this out.
 

Dan Carter

Supporter
My test wasn’t scientific, but I used my hand and some flow strips on the exit port next to the spider to witness the amount of air moving between the stock and Mishi fans. The difference visually and by feel was significant. The proof is no more overheats. Good hunting.
 

Joel K

Supporter
Kurt, I like that idea of using aluminum tubing inside the foot-box for the A/C and heater lines. Do you see any issues with the heat thrown off by the #8 line if you went that way? I was reading that the gas in that line gets heated up by the compressor.

I just ordered my bulkheads and U-bend-em lines a few days a go so will see if I can route the rubber hoses to my liking, but the aluminum may be the way to go.
 
My test wasn’t scientific, but I used my hand and some flow strips on the exit port next to the spider to witness the amount of air moving between the stock and Mishi fans. The difference visually and by feel was significant. The proof is no more overheats. Good hunting.
Good to know, thanks for sharing
 
Kurt, I like that idea of using aluminum tubing inside the foot-box for the A/C and heater lines. Do you see any issues with the heat thrown off by the #8 line if you went that way? I was reading that the gas in that line gets heated up by the compressor.

I just ordered my bulkheads and U-bend-em lines a few days a go so will see if I can route the rubber hoses to my liking, but the aluminum may be the way to go.
Joel,

I have not mocked up my AC lines inside the interior yet, hoping I can make the hoses work. I do agree that if you use aluminum tubing for the AC lines the -8 line could give off some heat. A little insulation around the tube would probably take care of it though.

I think the hoses will work since I can use a 90 degree fitting to come out of the Vintage Air unit to make half of the turn around. If the 90 degree fittings that come with the kit will not make the turn I see that Vintage Air sells 135 degree fittings, that should make it work.
 
Hector,

Thank you for the compliments, I do not really consider that I am moving quickly, I’d love to have time to make more progress.

I will be using bulkhead fittings to route the heater and AC hoses into the interior, just have not got them installed yet.

I very carefully bent the copper heater core tubes by hand with a close fitting rod inside the tube to act as a mandrel to keep it from collapsing. I did not remove the heater core.

I may have made more room but I still cannot seem to get my hoses routed in a way I like without linking them at the heater core. It will mean adding more joints and leak paths but I am bending some 5/8 aluminum tubing to route the lines inside the tub from the bulkheads to the heater core with short, straight ends of hose connecting them. I can bend the tubing with a tighter radius than the hose.
I ended up flipping the core like Joel did, it did help a lot , I managed to keep the hoses above the heater core, so that you would not hit them with your feet inside the footbox, I was able to secure them buy using clamps against the side, it was not pretty and it took lots of trial and error but I like how the routing turned out with the bulkhead fittings, not the prettiest, but functional. My theme all along. I am sue you will come up with a functional and very organized solution , tubing will definitely give you better options ,
 
Dan,

I have already read your build log about your fan choices and I am leaning towards the Mishi fans if the stock proves inadequate (unless someone convinces me to not wait for the inevitable). They are not rated much higher than the stock fans but I do not believe the published rating for the stock fans after testing them on my radiator. Wish I had anemometer to do some scientific problem solving.-----------Just checked Amazon, I may be purchasing a cheap one just to try this out.
Data is always your friend, hope you can figure it out with a cheap anemometer, fluid dynamics was never my strength LOL
 

Neil

Supporter
Not relative to my SL-C but while the wife and I were at a local car show the other night a local radio station interviewed me about the wife's GTO. She did not want to be on the interview so it was my four minutes of fame (LOL)!

Nice GTO, Kurt, good interview, too. I bought a new '65 Royal Bobcat GTO, a coupe in Nightwatch Blue, back in the Fall of 1964. Fun car! Enjoy your '66 convertible.
 
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