SLC Steering Column Placement

Joel K

Supporter
I am looking for some feedback regarding the stock steering column placement and if it is centered to the Driver’s side dash binnacle.

I’ve seen a few pictures where the steering wheel is centered and others where it is not, I am asking this since my car was delivered in a crate and the mounting holes were marked but not drilled through so figure I would ask what adjustments if any were done before I start drilling.

Thanks,

Joel
 
Hah, I was going to discuss this very topic in my next video, before my engine shut off ... :(

My car came with spacers and the column already installed. I shaved my spacers about ~0.25" to bring the wheel up higher; I have my column pushed up the maximum amount it will go before it runs into my AIM dash unit/driver's binnacle.

The steering column on my car is not centered relative to the driver's binnacle. Of course it may have gotten tweaked after I cut my dash panel up (but I doubt it made that much of a difference). However, the column angle relative to the vehicle centerline is also off.

You can see how my seat and column are angled relative to the vehicle centerline here (last photo): https://socalslc.com/2018/08/24/46-interior-refinement-revisited/

You can see the column to binnacle offset really well in this post (just before safety harness discussion): https://socalslc.com/2018/08/24/45-taking-aim/

My seat is set fairly upright and because of that the steering wheel pointed more toward my chest (you can see this more clearly in my driving video). In every other car I've ever driven I tend to set the steering wheel so the airbag is pointed more toward my throat/chin area. I suspect most SLC builders recline their seats more than I do so for most people the steering wheel is angled more traditionally than in mine.

At the end of the day - I think it all comes out as a bit of a wash. You get used to however the car is laid out and a degree or two here won't actually make much difference. If anything, I'm a lot more conscious of how the steering wheel is offset in my Audi than of the ergonomics in the SLC.

If you've got your wheel and electronics already, mock it all up - you may find setting it up so you can see "through" your steering wheel to be the most important thing to get right. I have shift lights along the top edge of my instrument cluster and I wouldn't have been able to see them if my wheel was any lower. It's going to be different for everyone.
 

Joel K

Supporter
Thanks for all the detail Cam, I guess the width of the seat, width of the center console both play a role in seat angle lining up with the steering wheel. I owned a couple dodge Vipers and they have some serious pedal offset so I understand the seat will need to be angled.

I guess what I am trying to avoid is mounting the steering column only to find out later I need to shift it over because it does not center in the driver binnacle independent of the seat angle. So wondering in general did other builders shift it over to line it up with the dash or the factory location works.
 
I did about the same as Cam. raised the column by about 1/2" from where it was originally and moved it to the left about 3/8" from the centerline of the binacle. With the seat and pedals angled, you don't really notice it in the car. I waited to final mount things until I had the center gage panel mocked up and the shifter in to ensure I didn't have any clearance issues between the shifter and the gage panel and from the seat I could get to all of the controls.
 
I cut the spacers in my column to where it was as high as the column could go. As with Cam's experience, mine touches the bottom of my gauge display. And I keep it tilted up as far as it will go at all times. In my case there is no need for enabling the power adjustment features of the column, because I'll never move it.

Edit: Additionally, I installed knobs in the ends of the cables that operate the tilt mechanisms so that they can be moved as needed for dash removal.
 
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Mine is centered to the dash. My seat is located to with regards to head and shoulder room (not specifically centered on the wheel).

Having put a lot of miles on a Viper, I can tell you the seat/wheel/pedals do NOT need to be centered to each other. You adapt quickly without thinking about it. The Viper BTW has everything out of kilter, looks really odd if you pay attention to it.
 
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