Transaxle clarification between 01e 01x etc

Hey guys. I'm trying to sift through the horrible naming convention that Audi uses on thier parts. I can't tell heads or tails from these numbers and there is a lot of incorrect info out there.
I know I need a FWD only version, but there are multiple models of each..Will any fwd 01e work? Are they different? How different? As an example here are some versionsnive found;
01e;
-01e301103kl
-01e300045G
-01e300048EX
-01e300047K
Then there are additional codes like;
DQS, GVD, EDU, FYF
01x;
-01x300044E
-01x300044E
-01x301211F
-01x300044M
-01x300044MX
-01x300044K
-01x300044JX


Can someone..anyone shed some light on this?
 

Adrian Starling

Supporter
A little more information which may help Sean.
 

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These guys can put you on the right path for your 01e: https://www.germantransaxle.com

Yes, it's best to start with a 2WD/FWD audi box and build from there rather than the 4WD.

Highly recommend installing a limited slip (not the audi torsen). The plate type LSD from a 911 transaxle bolts right into the 016 and the 01e with proper shimming/clearance. It can be done DIY if you have the right skills and tools/gauges. Without the LSD the torque steer can be brutal...and dangerous...if you have more than say 350 hp/tq. Also, the LSD will allow the transaxle to handle somewhat more power reliably.

The German Transaxle guys can set up the right gearing...including R&P....so that you end up with a useable 1st and relatively relaxed (2,200-2,500rpm) highway cruising at 75mph or so.

The 01e is a great transaxle choice if you're sub 400-425 hp/tq. It's lighter than many of the other transaxle options and shifts quite easily.

Good luck!
 
These guys can put you on the right path for your 01e: https://www.germantransaxle.com

Yes, it's best to start with a 2WD/FWD audi box and build from there rather than the 4WD.

Highly recommend installing a limited slip (not the audi torsen). The plate type LSD from a 911 transaxle bolts right into the 016 and the 01e with proper shimming/clearance. It can be done DIY if you have the right skills and tools/gauges. Without the LSD the torque steer can be brutal...and dangerous...if you have more than say 350 hp/tq. Also, the LSD will allow the transaxle to handle somewhat more power reliably.

The German Transaxle guys can set up the right gearing...including R&P....so that you end up with a useable 1st and relatively relaxed (2,200-2,500rpm) highway cruising at 75mph or so.

The 01e is a great transaxle choice if you're sub 400-425 hp/tq. It's lighter than many of the other transaxle options and shifts quite easily.

Good luck!
Thanks man, i'll reach out to them and see if they can guide me in a better direction than I've been going lol. Much appreciated
 
The Front wheel drive 01E is predominantly found with wide ratio gearsets. There are a few weird ones out there that are pretty rare. There is a super close ratio 01E with a .88 6th gear, a 5 speed found in some passats, and a version with a larger ring gear found in some A8's. It is not feasible to convert a 4 wheel drive unit to front wheel drive, as the majority of parts will need to be changed.

There are transmission codes, and then there are part numbers. The 01E30xxxxx is the part number and quite often 1 part number will replace several different transmission codes. Making sense of it all is a pretty complex task, and often dealers don't know either.
 
The Front wheel drive 01E is predominantly found with wide ratio gearsets. There are a few weird ones out there that are pretty rare. There is a super close ratio 01E with a .88 6th gear, a 5 speed found in some passats, and a version with a larger ring gear found in some A8's. It is not feasible to convert a 4 wheel drive unit to front wheel drive, as the majority of parts will need to be changed.

There are transmission codes, and then there are part numbers. The 01E30xxxxx is the part number and quite often 1 part number will replace several different transmission codes. Making sense of it all is a pretty complex task, and often dealers don't know either.
Thanks scott.. yeah I'm emailing you right now about having you build me one lol. Ill leave the aquision skills to a pro like you haha.
 
Hey guys. I'm trying to sift through the horrible naming convention that Audi uses on thier parts. I can't tell heads or tails from these numbers and there is a lot of incorrect info out there.
I know I need a FWD only version, but there are multiple models of each..Will any fwd 01e work? Are they different? How different? As an example here are some versionsnive found;
01e;
-01e301103kl
-01e300045G
-01e300048EX
-01e300047K
Then there are additional codes like;
DQS, GVD, EDU, FYF
01x;
-01x300044E
-01x300044E
-01x301211F
-01x300044M
-01x300044MX
-01x300044K
-01x300044JX


Can someone..anyone shed some light on this?
Hi Sean, realise you may by now have committed to something but I used an 01E in my GT40 replica mounted behind a coyote crate engine and it works just fine. The particular 01E to go for would be from a 2.5TDI V6, being a diesel motor the gearing is for low rpm and suits such a conversion perfectly, if I had the balls to do it my car would go beyond 200 mph. The centre of the gearbox is a cast iron casing which was designed so in order to withstand the rigours of towing etc as many of those cars would have done. The basic design of the gearbox is the same as was used in the Audi Quattro but without the rear take off. When I was searching for mine I looked for two codes FRF or DQS. There are still some available in Europe on eBay but they are becoming scarce. I installed a LSD in mine from Quaife, Wavetrac also produce one. Many of the internals like bearings and synchro's are common throughout many of the Audi gearboxes so maintenance if required is easy to source.
 
Hi Sean, realise you may by now have committed to something but I used an 01E in my GT40 replica mounted behind a coyote crate engine and it works just fine. The particular 01E to go for would be from a 2.5TDI V6, being a diesel motor the gearing is for low rpm and suits such a conversion perfectly, if I had the balls to do it my car would go beyond 200 mph. The centre of the gearbox is a cast iron casing which was designed so in order to withstand the rigours of towing etc as many of those cars would have done. The basic design of the gearbox is the same as was used in the Audi Quattro but without the rear take off. When I was searching for mine I looked for two codes FRF or DQS. There are still some available in Europe on eBay but they are becoming scarce. I installed a LSD in mine from Quaife, Wavetrac also produce one. Many of the internals like bearings and synchro's are common throughout many of the Audi gearboxes so maintenance if required is easy to source.
Hey Martin,
Thanks for all the great info. Haha, you're right, I did wind up getting the transmission figured out. and coincidentally I went with the 01E. Though, i'm not sure what it came out of exactly. I got mine through Scott with Advanced automotion. Thats really great to know about the 2.5TDI V6 though. That might be really useful in the future for me when it comes to upkeep.

haha yeah over 200, youd have to have a special pair to do that.

Was installing a LSD difficult? I'm not a transmission guy, and i'm curious if itd be worth it, since i'm mostly just planning to street/show it. Yeah, I'm glad there are so many interchangable parts on this tranny. I've got a porsche slave on it and shift linkage. What did you wind up using for shift linkage/cables/shifter and master/slave cyl? You're one of the only guys i've found that uses one and has some knowledge on it haha.
 
Hi Sean, the gearbox was used in so many vehicles, if you have a DQS or FRF then it will have come from something that had a 2.5tdi v6, Audi A4, A6, VW Passat, Skoda Fabia, Seat, who knows. I used a cable system originally but later changed to a jointed shaft, my selector is centrally mounted, I find the jointed shaft more positive. I think possibly my cables were too long and so more flexible. Cables if used correctly and kept to minimum length should work fine just as they do in most new vehicles. Wavetrac and Quaife both have lsd specific for that box and is a simple fit. Just be sure to get for a front wheel drive car, they are not the same as a front diff on a 4wd car even though the boxes look identical apart from the rear drive output. I would recommend using an lsd as with any car like this the power to weight ratio is going to be ridiculous and wheel spin inevitable without an lsd. Also with this box you can utilise the speedo sensor for digital speedometer but while you have the diff cover off you should count the segments on the magnetic ring which is on the left side output shaft, the number of segments differed between different vehicles. It's possibly the only difference on that gearbox between any vehicles that used it. I'll get back to you with info on the master cylinder but mine is a smaller bore Wilwood unit, the clutch plate diameter is quite small so the plate loading is very high (Audi RS6) or similar. I had to fabricate my own clutch release arm to suit the difference in height of the pressure plate. I am about to rig a reverse gear lockout, easiest and in my opinion the most effective way is to have a retractable collar that swings onto the selector shaft to prevent it being pushed in for reverse, the collar will be connected to a cable that runs into the cockpit which will then be actuated via a solenoid, controlled by a button on the steering wheel. It never stops, there's always something to improve or change just for preference.
 
Oh and another thing, if you have the opportunity while the box is being overhauled maybe, get the casings vapour blasted and powder coated. Likely the gearbox will be very visible on your car and without it they can quickly look quite ugly. I have two units, one powder coated and the other not, I'm swapping them around soon.
 
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