Which ZF transaxle to use?

Lets see if I can post a picture. This first one shows the plug location. The casting wall is thin in this area and has to be a pipe thread. I do not recall the size right off hand, but drill the hole at the smallest size of the range for the pipe threads or the plug could go all the way through before the taper stops it. The plug is directly above the inverted ZF logo and I am thinking it is 1/8" NPT.
 

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Lynn Larsen

Lynn Larsen
Patrick,

The picture above makes the new fill bung you created look awfully low in the box. Not only does it appear to be close to the bottom, it appeares to be a fair distance down from the flange, will the diff get proper lubrication there or is this just a problem of perspective in a 2D photo? Or, does the ZF have an internal oiling pump?

When filled to the proper level, is the input shaft on the ZF below the oil level like the Porsche, making the input shaft seal a good thing to replace if it is an unknown quantity?

Regards,
Lynn
 
I believe the stock oil fill level in a Pantera is 2.5 quarts. I just had some e-mails back and forth with Gary to clarify some things and went back to the ERA manual to make sure that I was not giving out incorrect information. Per my above photo, the centerline of the sight plug hole is located 3/4" below the casting web and just above the inverted ZF logo, by the lower left corner of the cast iron side cover. The plug size is 1/4" NPT. The casting wall thickness is thin in this area so use the smallest possible size drill bit for a 1/4" NPT thread. It is important that the taper is tight at the start of the plug or you could run the plug all the way through before it stops. After doing this the first oil fill on a clean box should be 2.7 quarts. Future oil changes will require 2.5 quarts to properly fill. After adding the sight plug to my box the recommended amount of oil filled right up to the new sight plug hole, so it seems to be correct. If I remember correctly, the oil level was below the shaft seal. So far no leaks. Oil fill is through the cover plate vent.
 

Lynn Larsen

Lynn Larsen
Cool, sure sounds like you have the true skinny on this; overfill can be just as bad than underfill.

It sounds like a judicious use of a little teflon tape might be in order for the plug. I wonder if they make a hex head 1/8" npt plug where the hex is larger than the threads? A nylon, copper or aluminum washer would then be a nice touch. Or, an o-ring might work as well.

Regards,
Lynn
 

Alex Hirsbrunner

Lifetime Supporter
I have found that using a hex head NPT cap red loctite'd to a short NPT nipple does the trick. In case your local ace hw doesn't have them check this out:

http://www.buyfittingsonline.com/Fittings/cat367_1.htm

I would be careful with the teflon tape though - most car manufacturers will not honor warranty repairs on automatic transmissions that have cracked housings around fittings if any evidence of tape is found. Apparently you can generate a huge amount of splitting force with relatively little torque being applied because of the lubrication that the tape provides and I suspect you could do the same to a transaxle.

Regards,

Al
 

Russ Noble

GT40s Supporter
Lifetime Supporter
[ QUOTE ]
A nylon, copper or aluminum washer would then be a nice touch. Or, an o-ring might work as well.


[/ QUOTE ]

A Dowty washer would be ideal for this application. A metal washer with an integral seal.

Regards
 

Lynn Larsen

Lynn Larsen
Good call, Russ! If any of you saw the post that KalunD made about the Porsche slave cylinder on a G50 and what a PITA plumbing it up is, a Dowty washer is exactly how I solved the issue. But KalunD provided an even better solution in the form of a BMW slave that not only solves the plumbing issue but also solves several others as well.

I started to, and should have, give a word of caution on teflon tape. The other issue is in getting bits of the tape inside the mechanism. NPT usually has enough clearance for the tape being tapered, but the point is well taken about being careful with its use. I have twisted off NPT brass fittings when using it. ("Guess, I don't know my own strength" - Bullwinkle J. Moose)

Regards,
Lynn
 
[ QUOTE ]
John,
I spoke with Dennis Quella from Pantera Performance (he has personally built over 200 ZFs)He says that he had Kennedy Engeneered Products http://www.kennedyeng.com/ make him a FE bell for a ZF for a customer.He said that he thinks they still have the mold.I would give them a call.
You shouldn't have any problems with the power.The engine in my Pantera makes 660hp and 510 tq. I have Spicer replacement halfshafts and everything is great.My Pantera weighs about 800# more than a GT40 and I'm not exactly easy on it if you know what I mean /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif.

[/ QUOTE ]

Ron,

just to follow this up, you say your using spicer halfshafts. Are you still using the standard ZF drive flanges, or did you change these too ?

Now another question. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/tongue.gif
Apparently there are two different types of diff in these (I think it was described as cam & Pawl, or plate). How do you tell, either by feel or by looking, which you have ?
I was told something about if you rotate one flange the other will either rotate same direction or reverse direction. To me this sounds like with/without limited slip diff rather than two types of LSD, or are there realy more than one type of limited slip diff in these ?

Cheers guys.
John.
p.s. I have brought a ZF now, but it needs work (had to put some money into the engine parts, so it was this one or nothing).
 
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