AEM Pumps

Shaun

Supporter
Hi
Anyone any experience of these?
I was thinking of 2 of them to feed my swirl pot then out via an AEM filter aka
Cheers
 

Eddy McClements

Supporter
I thought you'd be using a couple of low-pressure pumps (one per main tank) to feed the swirl pot, then one of these:-



from swirl pot to fuel rail -> fuel pressure regulator -> back to swirl pot. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think you want to feed your swirl pot via an unregulated high-pressure supply (90-ish PSI) from an EFI pump. You're likely to blow the swirl pot seams.



Like this, but with two low-pressure pumps. The important thing about a swirl pot (surge tank) is that it must be kept full, and have provision for an air bleed from the top back to the main tanks. Providing your low-pressure pumps can keep up with demand from the engine, it's relatively simple, and it works well.
 

Ian Anderson

Lifetime Supporter
Supporter
I would agree with Eddy

Only change would be to return the fuel rail fuel to the swirl tank.
the reason being if your tank pump sucks air in very quick time you will empty your swirl pot.

On my car from half tank down with spirited driving and braking I can hear the low pressure pump sucking air as the fuel sloshes forward. When this happens the HP injector pump only has the swirl tank volume to work on!

on acceleration fuel sloshes back and the L
p pump refills the swirl.


if I was to do it again I would add hydra at to the bottom of both tanks.

ian
 

Bill Kearley

Supporter
I went with Holly fuel mats, primary filter, main pump, secondary filter, fuel rail, regulator and return to the tank. Mount fuel pump as low as possible near the tank.
 

Shaun

Supporter
Hi all
Yes aiming for 2 LP pumps feeding the swirl pot, thing was on the spec it said
"naturally aspirated and forced induction EFI vehicles"
hence I wondered if they could be used as a LP pump but further down the spec I noticed it all seemed to be HP specs so probably no good. Did look at Facets but have heard some mixed reviews on them.
Mick suggested Mitsuba ones but they are rare these days it seems, Paul Bav uses them in his SGT
I am feeding the swirl pot via two LP pumps then swirly pot out to filter, HP pump and filter then fuel rail, regulator and back to pot, Pot overflow goes to whichever tank is supplying the fuel.
Anyone any thoughts on Facets?
Cheers
 

Ian Anderson

Lifetime Supporter
Supporter
Facet? About 250 hp max or they will battle to keep up.

Carter does some ones that seem to,last, Paul Walton has them And driven a lot of miles.

if you can fit the hydra mat!

ian
 
Anyone any thoughts on Facets?
Two tanks being drained simultaneously by two pumps = 500 BHP capacity.

I can't imagine when I'd need to use that much power continuously for there to be any chance of a problem ..... or when I'd have that much available in the first place :oops:

This is the likely route I'll be taking with my 347 engine.
 

Shaun

Supporter
I'm sort of with Mark here, odd blast down the road not aiming for Spa, the tanks are not all that big, any drain for a while and I'll be popping to Esso all the time :)
All good info chaps most of the build is understanding all the options, we could of course just buy a supercar but where is the fun in that!!
 

Ian Anderson

Lifetime Supporter
Supporter

so if you turn on both pumps at the same time where does the overflow go?
my guess the swirl etc will be closer to one side so the lower length of return pipe on that side will mean the flow goes there, possible overfill one tank?

Holley pumps are reported to be very good but the reports also say they are very noisy.

ian
 
In my case I'll running both pumped feeds into a single regulator and then onto a carburettor which, if I'm correct, doesn't need a return feed to the tank.

I guess it's questions like this that make the argument for a tank-to-tank balance pipe a lot stronger.
At least with one of those you only need to return fuel to one tank ..... I think.
 

Shaun

Supporter
Hi Ian
In my setup you cannot have both pumps at the same time, as you fire a pump up it opens a valve that back feeds that same tank its pumping from
Noise may not be an issue, stroked 302 with straight pipes may hide the pump noise :)
Happy days
 

Ian Anderson

Lifetime Supporter
Supporter
In my case I'll running both pumped feeds into a single regulator and then onto a carburettor which, if I'm correct, doesn't need a return feed to the tank.

I guess it's questions like this that make the argument for a tank-to-tank balance pipe a lot stronger.
At least with one of those you only need to return fuel to one tank ..... I think.
That would work as the carb float chamber is the reservoir to keep the engine running for any air sucked into the pump.it would work past the float needle at the carb. And no you should not need a return, though sometimes they are used to help reduce heat soak in the feed pipes causing hot fuel whic evaporates and can cause difficult hot starting.

ian
 

Eddy McClements

Supporter
There's an online fuel rate calculator here:- https://www.raceworks.com.au/calculators/fuel-pump-calculator/

Which suggests that you need about 175 litres per hour for 500hp, running continuously at full chat. A couple of Carter or Hardi fuel pumps - one per tanks - should comfortably exceed that, giving some headroom. There are very few places in the UK where you could hold a GT40 flat-out for any appreciable length of time so that you'd be consuming the full 175 litres/hour....are there?

If you're feeding the output of your fuel pressure regulator on the fuel rail back to one of the tanks, your low-pressure pump needs to keep up with the full flow rate of the high-pressure pump, or the latter will empty the swirl pot back into the tank. An alternative is to feed the output of the fuel rail regulator back into the swirl pot, in which case the low-pressure pump only needs to keep up with the fuel consumed by the engine, essentially keeping the swirl pot topped-up to replace what is being used. There is a slight disadvantage, in that the fuel circulated via the rail and back to the pot will be warmed, but if the swirl pot is large enough and has some air flow to it this should be manageable.
 

Ian Anderson

Lifetime Supporter
Supporter
There's an online fuel rate calculator here:- https://www.raceworks.com.au/calculators/fuel-pump-calculator/

Which suggests that you need about 175 litres per hour for 500hp, running continuously at full chat. A couple of Carter or Hardi fuel pumps - one per tanks - should comfortably exceed that, giving some headroom. There are very few places in the UK where you could hold a GT40 flat-out for any appreciable length of time so that you'd be consuming the full 175 litres/hour....are there?

If you're feeding the output of your fuel pressure regulator on the fuel rail back to one of the tanks, your low-pressure pump needs to keep up with the full flow rate of the high-pressure pump, or the latter will empty the swirl pot back into the tank. An alternative is to feed the output of the fuel rail regulator back into the swirl pot, in which case the low-pressure pump only needs to keep up with the fuel consumed by the engine, essentially keeping the swirl pot topped-up to replace what is being used. There is a slight disadvantage, in that the fuel circulated via the rail and back to the pot will be warmed, but if the swirl pot is large enough and has some air flow to it this should be manageable.

Correct Eddy the swirl pot fuel can get warm - in which case on the return from the rail to the swirl insert a fuel cooler.Lots available and used on small diesel engine cars.
as an example
Ian
 

Shaun

Supporter
Ok so seems Holley Red Tops need to be at the same level as the tank which mine cannot be
Found a Carter but am I correct on that a vane pump needs to be gravity fed?
Does it need to be a lift pump? Mine are about 350mm from the lowest part of the tank pickup
 

Neil

Supporter
Shaun, I use the Carter P4600HP fuel pump; it is the internally pressure regulated version of that pump. It is mounted about 8" above the bottom of my fuel cell but that does not cause any problems.
 

Shaun

Supporter
That's Reds out from the horses mouth so to speak!!

Thank you for contacting Holley Tech.
Holley Red fuel pumps such as 12-801-1 must be mounted below fuel tank in order to work properly.
 
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