Can Advanced Aero Research Tool Help SLC, LMP?

Mesa, this is a serious post, from The New Scientist.

Here is an article and a representative photo of an advanced means of studying, in even greater detail, the aerodynamics of, yes, an airplane. But this method, along with conventional wind tunnel testing and computation fluid dynamics (CFD) could even help SLC and LMP aerodynamic studies, helping us make our cars even faster.

Fran can this help you?


dn24298-1_1200.jpg

Image Credit: NASA Langley/Preston Martin
From Glowing jester plane reveals invisible wind eddies - tech - 30 September 2013 - New Scientist
[This glowing plane] is actually in a NASA wind tunnel, where researchers are studying the flight characteristics of possible future planes.

The plane is a 5.8 per cent scale model of the X-48C, the latest in a series of blended wing aircraft being developed by NASA and Boeing. . . . the concept needs extensive testing. . . .

Here, researchers at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, have sprayed the model with fluorescent oil to see air flow patterns during tests in a wind tunnel. Studying the glowing lines will help them better understand how the full-scale aircraft behaves in the air.
(Note: edited by me for size and emphasis)

Les
 
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Fran Hall RCR

GT40s Sponsor
We do a lot of CFD as we were sponsored by a software company.

My engineer is ex-aero from Mclaren cars in the UK, he did the aero development on the 12C and also the new P1.
 
Other than pretty pictures, that doesn't appear to offer anything more than the well-established practice of oil flow tests. If you don't mind getting your car dirty, there's nothing preventing you from already doing such full-scale aero testing.
 

Jim Craik

Lifetime Supporter
Do the lines represent pressure, or perhaps this is a full stall?

It's hard for me to believe that the airflow really travels sideways and circles back like that.
 

Keith

Moderator
We do a lot of CFD as we were sponsored by a software company.

My engineer is ex-aero from Mclaren cars in the UK, he did the aero development on the 12C and also the new P1.

Oh, there goes the fag packet theory then..........:shifty:
 

Keith

Moderator
It's a grand British tradition. Doesn't matter who works for you or high they are up the academic food chain, they all wear brown coats and work in sheds. :)
 
The F1 Mclaren pictures and NASA pictures shows Bondary layer air flow.
For the McLaren, I believe this was at the time of the F duct experimentation.
The downforce number we have on the SLC are well above the McLaren P1. The main difference is the P1 was to be driven fast on open freeway with speed exceeding 200mph, generating incredible downforce number if the spiltter and diffuser was too agressive, while an F1 car or the SLC is design for track usage with Low, mid & high speed (<120mph) corner in consideration.
If the SLC go to Daytona or Le Mans, Fran will need to loose some downforce. :thumbsup:
 
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