Chuck's Jaguar D Type Build

Chuck, I saw the Instagram post showing the fuel pump and pressure regulator that you're using. From the pictures, it looks like the pump is the Carter P4600HP and the regulator is an Aeromotive SKU 13222. Is that accurate? I'm planning on using a Triple Weber kit that is specifically jetted for a completely stock 8:1 compression XK6 4.2 (out of a Series 2 XJ6). Any chance your setup might be overkill for my particular setup?
 
As you will learn. Weber Carbs work with quite low fuel pressure! Maybe lots of flow, but low pressure.

I would be very interested in the specific body, venturi, jets you are using.

I have a stock 4.2 from an '83 XJ6. Pierce manifolds was my source for the manifold and three 45DCOE's.

I built a run stand for the engine. Lo and behold, their setup runs quite well on the stand! Getting the timing to cooperate was more challenging.

I am compiling a table with all the vario6 "recommendations" for Webers and jets, and would like to add yours.
 
I had acquired different jets with the suspicion that the "as-Delivered" jetting from Pierce Manifolds wouldnt work. But it really did work on the run stand. Engine is now set in the chassis for fitting and completion. But Michigan's clampdown has halted progress.
 

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Chuck

Supporter
Doug:

Your question was timely, since I have been working on the fuel system and was just getting ready to post some details. You are indeed correct regarding the pump and regulator. This would be an ideal system for you as well and would not be overkill. The key is well regulated low pressure. The jetting won’t change the need for the low pressure input.

Here is a parts list. Installation details coming.

Fuel System, Part I

The components selected include:

1 Carter P4600HP fuel pump
1 Fuel filter, 10 micron, TNK-FF-10
2 pkg Hose clamps, 3/8”, EAR750006ERL
1 Aeroquip pressure regulator, 13222
2 DEK-6-02-0501 hose barb
1 DEK-6-02-0717 cap and plug
1 Thermo-Sleeve, THE-14005

The Carter pump is a rotary vane style with an output pressure of 6 to 8 psi and plenty of flow volume. American made, it should be well suited to this application.

The Aeroquip pressure regulator is a pricey item, but my experience with the more common inexpensive regulators has not been good. We used this same regulator on the GT 40 with its four Weber IDAs and it has worked very well. It can be adjusted from 2 to 5 psi, which is perfect for the Weber side draft carbs on the Jaguar. The non-glossy finish should blend in well.

The fuel filter is a hefty unit, flows freely, yet has 10 microns of filtration which is much better than most of the inexpensive in line filters. It has a vintage look, although few will see it once installed.
 

Chuck

Supporter
Chuck- Did you check your alignment once everything was tightened down to spec? Did anything change?
Chris: Guessing you are referring to the GT. It has been so long since I checked alignment I honestly don't recall. I recently invested in some decent allignment tools and re-doing the GT is on the list. Like you, I would like some better centering hence plans to increase the caster. Let me know how yours turns out.
 

Chuck

Supporter
Nope, was asking about the set up you were doing with the D-type in this post. I am curious if anything changed after upping the clamping force.

I've been meaning to connect with you to talk through a few pointers I picked up along the way when doing the alignment. Will try to call you in the next couple of days.
Chris:

No changes on the rear, which I have now tightened. Solid rear axle and trailing links pretty forgiving in that department. The front is a long way from completion, which is were I would have more concern about possible changes when things are tightened.
 

Chris Kouba

Supporter
Sorry Chuck, this alignment:



Curious to know if anything move once you tightened the bellhouse to the block (or if you even checked it again).
 

Chuck

Supporter
Sorry Chris. Totally missed the ball. I thought you were talking about suspension alignment, since that is what I have been working on here lately and since that is what you have been working on too. ( My posts tend to lag what I am actually working on by a week or two or more. )

Regarding the bell housing, it is sitting on the shelf pending receipt of some critical parts. Once the clutch and pressure plate are in place I won't be able to check it. Although the bolts were not torqued to spec when I was checking the runout, they were good and tight, so I would not expect any change with final assembly.
 

Chuck

Supporter
Fuel System, Part II

The location for the fuel pump was determined. The center line was set three inches inboard from the right side of the tunnel and high enough to clear the brake connection. The bracket was bent slightly so that the pump will stand vertically when bolted to the angled rear panel.

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The fuel line was made from 3/8” ID aluminum tube. At the connection points a bead was added using this clever beading tool. I always add a bead to these lines to minimize the risk of the hose slipping off.

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Adel clamps were used to hold the fuel line securely in place at approximately 9” intervals.

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The Aeromotive regulator was placed in a location that lines up with the vertical input line and is horizontally on the same level as the stabilizer link bracket. We will likely remove it before the engine is installed to avoid risking damage, then replace it once the engine is installed.

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The fuel tank support was set in place using quarter inch stainless steel counter sunk screws. Anti-seize was applied to the screws. It seems that aluminum fuel tanks are invariably warped to some degree; an unfortunate problem with welding aluminum. To compensate for the warpage washers were placed between the fuel tank frame and the horizontal support at opposite corners.

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Felt spacers, 3/8” thick and one inch long, were placed on the fuel tank support to cushion and account for dimensional variations in the tank.

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There are a few more details to complete
 

Chuck

Supporter
Fuel System, Part III

Rather than simply suspend the fuel filter with a couple of hose connections, we decided to solidly secure it using the large bracket provided. But simply fastening it to the rear panel would prevent the lines from running neatly, so another option was found.

A section of half inch thick black Sea Board (HDPE) was cut to 5 x 3 ½ inches to provide the foundation. A quarter inch diameter bolt, 1 ½” long was used to hold the bracket. An appropriate hole was drilled for the bracket. Two small screws were used to secure the other side. So far so good.

Someday the filter may have to be replaced. Removing the seat to gain access to the head of the bolt would be quite a chore. To avoid this problem a nut, lock washer, and red Loctite were used to hold the bolt tightly to the rear bulkhead. The quarter inch hole in the Sea Board was then enlarged using a step drill so that it would fit over the nut. The two smaller screws were then used to hold the board in place. A second nut and washer were used to hold the filter bracket to the bolt, which can be easily removed without having to access the head of the bolt.

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The fuel tank was set in place and the stainless tie downs secured. The fuel line connection to the tank was made. Note that the flexible hose on the top of the filter and to the fuel pickup were made a bit longer so that they could be more easily removed. An Adel clamp holds the aluminum line to the frame member, barely visible in this photo.

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There a few more details that will need to be addressed once we receive additional parts.

Follow the progress on Facebook and at Instagram
@constant_speed37
 
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Chuck

Supporter
Front Brakes: the Problem

The front brakes provided by RCR use Wilwood calipers, #120-11135. Assembly requires a spacer between the hub and the rotor which centers the rotor. There is also a machined bracket which is specific to the caliper provided by RCR to fit the offset requirements of that specific caliper. The components came together nicely.

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There was, however, a problem. The calipers are too big for the D Type wheels. It took 5/8” of spacer plates to move the wheel out far enough to clear the caliper. That is not acceptable.

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RCR had planned to address this issue but since our project had reached a point where the unresolved brake problem had become a progress stopper, we decided to help out RCR and come up with a solution on our own.

The brake rotor hub opening diameter is 3 1/8 inches. The hub is 2 3/4 inches. In order to fill the gap RCR provides a spacer 3/16” thick with a ring to fill the gap. This spacer moves the rotor and caliper outward that distance, contributing to the caliper clearance problem.

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The solution needed to address three issues: revising the 3/16” spacer to move the rotor inward and finding a caliper that would provide better clearance. Since we do not have access to a mill, finding a way of using the existing caliper support bracket provided by RCR was also necessary.

After many hours of thought and research, the solution proved to be remarkably simple.
 
Front Brakes: the Problem

The front brakes provided by RCR use Wilwood calipers, #120-11135. Assembly requires a spacer between the hub and the rotor which centers the rotor. There is also a machined bracket which is specific to the caliper provided by RCR to fit the offset requirements of that specific caliper. The components came together nicely.

View attachment 106716

View attachment 106717

There was, however, a problem. The calipers are too big for the D Type wheels. It took 5/8” of spacer plates to move the wheel out far enough to clear the caliper. That is not acceptable.

View attachment 106718

RCR had planned to address this issue but since our project had reached a point where the unresolved brake problem had become a progress stopper, we decided to help out RCR and come up with a solution on our own.

The brake rotor hub opening diameter is 3 1/8 inches. The hub is 2 3/4 inches. In order to fill the gap RCR provides a spacer 3/16” thick with a ring to fill the gap. This spacer moves the rotor and caliper outward that distance, contributing to the caliper clearance problem.

View attachment 106719

The solution needed to address three issues: revising the 3/16” spacer to move the rotor inward and finding a caliper that would provide better clearance. Since we do not have access to a mill, finding a way of using the existing caliper support bracket provided by RCR was also necessary.

After many hours of thought and research, the solution proved to be remarkably simple.

Wilwood makes narrow calipers. Would those help? Also, are those calipers for .81 or thicker rotors?

 
I’m assuming this isn’t exclusive to a spline drive setup. I’m going the ‘fake route’ with lugs and fake spinner.
 
I was on the verge of getting the RCR wheels. I happened to be on the phone with Terrys Jaguar about something engine related, and it occurred to me to ask “Say, those 15” Dunlop rims... any chance I could get them in 16x6?” Turns out, they could do that, and for not much more than the 15” rims. Granted, it’s a special order and would take a month or two (pre-vivid conversation).
 

Chuck

Supporter
Barry and Doug:

I am using the reproduction wheels, made in England.

It is a 16" wheel. Here are the dimensions on the back side, which I measured to explore the caliper size issue:

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The tires I plan to use are 185VR16. Here is a description that appears on the Lucas Tires website of the specific tire I have picked out
https://www.lucasclassictires.com/185VR16-PIRELLI-CINTURATO-CA67-518p.htm

"185VR16 is the Radial equivalent to 600x16 bias ply tire. Cars like XK120, XK140, XK150 Jaguars, Aston Martin DB2, DB3 and early DB4 still used the bias tire size but if you asked Jaguar to fit a radial tire to your later XK, then Jaguar would use a 185VR16 PIRELLI CINTURATO ™ CA67, because at the time Dunlop weren't making a suitable radial. If you asked Aston Martin to fit a radial tire to your David Brown Aston Martin, the Aston took off the Bias ply Avon TurboSpeed, and as a radial they would put on the PIRELLI CINTURATO ™. Pre 1963 Astons radial tire option was the 185VR16 PIRELLI CINTURATO ™ CA67."

The tires which I currently have are slightly oversized, bias ply tires needed to transport the car. I hope to order the Pirelli tires shortly when the body work begins.
 

Chuck

Supporter
Wilwood makes narrow calipers. Would those help? Also, are those calipers for .81 or thicker rotors?

Adam:

The rotors are 1" width, so need to go with the 1.10 disc width Wilwood option. Narrower rotors would have helped, but we will work with what we have.

You anticipated the solution. The Wilwood narrow calipers will be the solution. Hope to get the details sorted and written up shortly.
 
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