Chuck's Jaguar D Type Build

Chuck

Supporter
Stabilizer Link, Part II

A bushing goes into the bottom of the stabilizer link. It looks too big, and it can’t just be pushed in or it will be damaged. After a bit of head scratching, we got it done.

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We took the bushing into the kitchen, dropped it in a zip lock back, and set it in the freezer between the frozen peas and rocky road ice cream for a couple of hours. Just before removing it a heat gun was used to warm up the stabilizer link bar, but not too much or the rubber bushing could melt when inserted. While still hot to the touch, the frozen bushing was sprayed with silicon and then pushed about three fourths of the way. It took a final push with our bench top press to get the job done. (The vise would have worked as well).

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Chuck

Supporter
Stabilizer Link, Part III

We wanted to assure the bracket was precisely located and secured to the fire wall. Here is how we match drilled the holes.

Four 5/16” Grade 8 bolts hold the bracket on the firewall. When the bracket was fabricated the four holes were not drilled out to 5/16”, but rather just to 1/8”.

With the engine setting in place the location of the bracket on the firewall was confirmed and marked with a Sharpie.

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After the engine was removed (for the third time), a single 1/8” hole was drilled into the fire wall through one of the holes in the bracket. A cleco then held the bracket temporarily in place. Now the bracket could be precisely leveled, and a second 1/8” hole drilled for a second cleco. The remaining two holes were drilled. We now had four matching holes lined up perfectly.

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With all four holes drill out to 1/8” and clecoed in place, the holes were drilled out to 5/16”, one at a time, a bolt inserted and tightened. A digital level confirmed perfect alignment.

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This technique assures aligned holes drilled to the exact size. Later we will paint the bracket silver. The final installation will be after the engine is installed for the last time, when the bolts will be properly torqued.

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Follow the progress on Facebook and at Instagram @constant_speed37
 
Stabilizer Link, Part III

We wanted to assure the bracket was precisely located and secured to the fire wall. Here is how we match drilled the holes.

Four 5/16” Grade 8 bolts hold the bracket on the firewall. When the bracket was fabricated the four holes were not drilled out to 5/16”, but rather just to 1/8”.

With the engine setting in place the location of the bracket on the firewall was confirmed and marked with a Sharpie.

View attachment 103915

After the engine was removed (for the third time), a single 1/8” hole was drilled into the fire wall through one of the holes in the bracket. A cleco then held the bracket temporarily in place. Now the bracket could be precisely leveled, and a second 1/8” hole drilled for a second cleco. The remaining two holes were drilled. We now had four matching holes lined up perfectly.

View attachment 103916

With all four holes drill out to 1/8” and clecoed in place, the holes were drilled out to 5/16”, one at a time, a bolt inserted and tightened. A digital level confirmed perfect alignment.

View attachment 103917

This technique assures aligned holes drilled to the exact size. Later we will paint the bracket silver. The final installation will be after the engine is installed for the last time, when the bolts will be properly torqued.

View attachment 103918

Follow the progress on Facebook and at Instagram @constant_speed37
Beautiful, precise work as usual!
 

Chris Kouba

Supporter
This technique assures aligned holes drilled to the exact size. Later we will paint the bracket silver. The final installation will be after the engine is installed for the last time, when the bolts will be properly torqued.
Don't forget to oversize the bracket holes to account for the thickness of the paint applied...

Fantastic work. I envy your patience and meticulousness.
 
Hello Chuck. I was wondering what size wheels you got for your D-Type? Are they 15s or 16s? Also, are you running bias ply tires or radials with the bias look? And if radials, what size? 185, 190, 205?

Also, how are you mounting your alternator? Are you fabricating your bracket or is there one available in the aftermarket world?
 

Chuck

Supporter
Doug:

The tires seen in the pictures I have posted are not acceptable. They are cheap, bias ply and the wrong size. Here is what I plan to use:

https://www.lucasclassictires.com/185VR16-PIRELLI-CINTURATO-CA67-518p.htm

The description from the website:

185VR16 is the Radial equivalent to 600x16 bias ply tire. Cars like XK120, XK140, XK150 Jaguars, Aston Martin DB2, DB3 and early DB4 still used the bias tire size but if you asked Jaguar to fit a radial tire to your later XK, then Jaguar would use a 185VR16 PIRELLI CINTURATO ™ CA67, because at the time Dunlop weren't making a suitable radial. If you asked Aston Martin to fit a radial tire to your David Brown Aston Martin, the Aston took off the Bias ply Avon TurboSpeed, and as a radial they would put on the PIRELLI CINTURATO ™. Pre 1963 Astons radial tire option was the 185VR16 PIRELLI CINTURATO ™ CA67.

Dunlop racing tires would be original, but they are hard to get, pricey, and not really intended for street use.

I have not yet determined how the alternator will be mounted. I am anticipating that a bracket will either have to be modified or fabricated from scratch.
 

Chuck

Supporter
Pedals, Part II, Research and Development

On January 9 we posted tentative plans for setting up top mounted pedals. The plan was to place the pedal pivot point just below the top of the foot box. I am grateful for the excellent feedback and especially the amazing CAD drawings created by Michel.

One take away from that exchange was that the pivot point was lower than desirable and thus the pedals would set too close to the floor. The pedal arms could be shortened or the angle changed, but we preferred not to change the pedal geometry.

We also learned that the single tandem master cylinder we proposed to used was not of sufficient capacity to power the brakes in the Jaguar after speaking to a tech at Wilwood. So back to the drawing boards. Literally.

The option of mounting the pivot point above the pedal box is being explored. After a lot of measuring, this seems to be a feasible option. We can use the Wilwood master cylinders supplied by RCR. The two brake cylinders side by side will not capture the look of the single tandem master cylinder on the original, but the function may well be better.


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Once the basic dimensions were determined a cardboard mock up was made.

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Finally, plans with dimensions were drawn.


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This design separates the brake and clutch pedal an additional inch, so their center lines will be five inches apart, which is the same separation as on the RCR pedals. These two pedals will straddle the steering column. The top of this pedal ‘box’ will clear the bottom of the Weber carbs by about an inch. Slots will be cut in the top of the foot box so the pedals can be slid in from the top. The pedal ‘box’ may be adjustable fore and aft a bit to obtain the best possible location.

The accelerator pedal will fit on the end of the half inch pivot rod, just inside of the angle chassis beam, which is essentially the same location as the original. The pedal arm will have to be modified to place the accelerator pedal a proper distance from the brake pedal.

I am interested in any comments and advice before I start cutting, drilling, and welding.
 
A question we are dealing with is whether the 4.2 with the triple 45DCOE's will end up vertical or with some angle. RCR has reduced the height of the driver footbox for Weber clearance, but some access for the Webers is still desired. Having dealt with the accumulated residue in used 40DCOE's on my 240Z, I replaced the blank bottom comers on the Jag carbs with covers with drain fittings.
The space available for an alternator could be affected by some tilt. One possibility is to mount the alternator forward of the belt.
 

Ian Anderson

Lifetime Supporter
Supporter
Chuck,
not sure if you have exhaust headers lined up but these came upon Facebook.
i know nothing about them or if they will even work with your chassis.


ian
 

Chuck

Supporter
A question we are dealing with is whether the 4.2 with the triple 45DCOE's will end up vertical or with some angle. RCR has reduced the height of the driver footbox for Weber clearance, but some access for the Webers is still desired. Having dealt with the accumulated residue in used 40DCOE's on my 240Z, I replaced the blank bottom comers on the Jag carbs with covers with drain fittings.
The space available for an alternator could be affected by some tilt. One possibility is to mount the alternator forward of the belt.
Not sure tilting the engine is desirable. Yes, the original did have a tilt but doing so sets up a cascade of issues on our reproduction. First is modifying the engine mounts. Second is modifying the intake manifold so the carbs remain level. Third is the affect it will have on the headers - the space to run them is already very tight and that would make it tighter. Would need to give this some thought to see if the benefits outweigh the disadvantages.

I hope the five or so inches of clearance below the Webers (which will be taken up partially by the steering column and pedal assembly) will be sufficient for underside access.

I have not yet figured out the alternator location.
 
From my studies and seeing it up close at RCR last month, I don't think there are too many options for alternator location other than towards the top of the exhaust manifold side. Given the similarities between the D and E Types, my current plan is to get an alternator bracket for a non air conditioned E Type. Hopefully that will do the trick without too much cutting and grinding.

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