Claude nahum

Another note from Amelia Island. I am aware of Mr. Nahum only because of this forum and as many of you know it's always nice to put faces to names when the opportunity presents itself. This past weekend was such a case.

Mr. Nahum, for those of you who may not know, is the owner of at least 2 originals (?) and has commissioned Gelscoe of England to produce a couple of other "tribute" cars those being 1075 and most recently and present at the event s/n 101. And what a car it is. Breathtaking falls short in describing the car.

The car looks more compact then other MK I's I've seen but Mr. Nahum did not spare in giving "originality" to the car. It's equipped with the rare Ford 255 Indy engine with its distributor sitting at 90 degrees, a Coletti gearbox and 4 Webers that are even rarer. It sounded like a race car should as he went to accept his well deserved prize.

On top of that Mr. Nahum, like so many other people I've met from this forum, is as polite and down to earth as any one can be. He speaks beautiful English and has an infectious smile and laugh. He loves talking GT40's with anyone and has untold stories. It was my pleasure to spend a short period of time with him as many others lined up to ask him about the car.

Mr. Nahum told me the car will remain in the US for some months before heading back to Europe so if you get the opportunity to see the car, take it. I believe the car is heading to California next. And if Mr. Nahum's around do yourself a favor and chat with him. He's a great man to spend even the briefest of moments with.

I do have photos of both the MK III I mentioned earlier in another post and s/n 101 which I will forward to my tech expert Pat Chaffin to hopefully post.
 

Keith

Moderator
Fantastic news. It would be fascinating to see (and hear) one of those rare as hen's teeth Indy 255's. I always puzzled as to why Ford didn't persevere with this lump in the GT40- program as among other racing enhancements such as gear driven camshaft and water pump, it featured the in-block 'O' rings which proved necessary on the 289's following a series of head gasket failures and subsequent race DNF's. It certainly produced the HP and there was probably more to come..

Detailed spec here: Indy Engines -- The Ford V-8 Engine Workshop

46mm Webers! Makes hen's teeth look positively prolific...
 
I confirm Claude Nahum is really close to the fans of GT40.

He is always a gentlemen and very accessible regardless if you are an original owner, a 'reconstructed' owner or simply a fan of them.

I met him several times when I came with my GTD at classic races as a spectator and I also raced against him in Historic races with a Chevron B8. Needless to say he was faster...but also a great gentlemen racer mentality on the track.
 

Rick Muck- Mark IV

GT40s Sponsor
Supporter
Fantastic news. It would be fascinating to see (and hear) one of those rare as hen's teeth Indy 255's. I always puzzled as to why Ford didn't persevere with this lump in the GT40- program as among other racing enhancements such as gear driven camshaft and water pump, it featured the in-block 'O' rings which proved necessary on the 289's following a series of head gasket failures and subsequent race DNF's. It certainly produced the HP and there was probably more to come..

Detailed spec here: Indy Engines -- The Ford V-8 Engine Workshop

46mm Webers! Makes hen's teeth look positively prolific...
Ford had not made the 255 reliable enough during FAVs running the program. Shelby wanted "simple" and their solution was to just drop the proven, all iron 289 with wet sump into the '40. The weight the iron vs. ally engine added was offset by the weight savings in the dry sump tank and lines so the real weight gain was minimal. Plus they already had a shithouse full of 289s around the shop!
 
Hi JP,
I can echo everything you say and in spades!
As a member of the GT40EC he has contributed to many a Fortyfication and whenever we meet up at Le Mans, Goodwood, Donnington etc. he is always generous with his precious time. At Goodwood he was kind enough to suggest I sit in 1016 after I asked how heavy the clutch was. Dan Gurney had just been discussing why he could not drive the car due to an ankle injury. The clutch was unbelievably heavy and like a switch. But that is the sort of thing this generous man does. A true gent! BTW he also owns 1078 and the 1st Gelsco car you mention is 1075. An absolute recreation of the LMC winner.
Long may Claude be seen around the tracks of Europe.

Oh BTW he also has a Lola T70 and a few other nice cars as well.
 
I too can agree everything JP and Paul B have said. When the Enthusiasts Club have had a gathering e.g. Le Mans Classic or a stand at Goodwood Festival of Speed, Claude has taken time out of his busy schedule to come over and talk to the members present.This is always appreciated.

And not forgetting the ex Alan Mann Racing F3L Paul.
 

Lifetime Supporter
Thank you for the kind comments made on the forum.

The GT40 community is a special community. My brief visit to Amelia was an eye opener. Both Sylvie, my wife and I were amazed at the interest in the GT 101 re-creation and the amazing knowledge the GT40 fans had on the past and whole history of the car.

It was such a pleasure to be able to connect with people whose stories, comments and debates I read on the forum.

It was all crowned by the prize for the best re-creation

I am simply glad to be part of this great community of guardians of a fabulous past.
 
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Well said, Claude.
A gracious reply to well-deserved tributes.
Claude has been a highly respected contributor to Fortyfication. His articles on preparing and racing P/1016 in particular have been entertaining and most enlightening.
 

Keith

Moderator
Ford had not made the 255 reliable enough during FAVs running the program. Shelby wanted "simple" and their solution was to just drop the proven, all iron 289 with wet sump into the '40. The weight the iron vs. ally engine added was offset by the weight savings in the dry sump tank and lines so the real weight gain was minimal. Plus they already had a shithouse full of 289s around the shop!
I agree that's the official line but my understanding was (is) that the 255 had been proven in hard running enduro events such as Indianapolis.. Whatever, it would be fantastic to see/hear Claude's 255 in 101. Perhaps Goodwood FOS or Revival this year, or will they look askance at a "recreation" no matter how faithful?
 

Rick Muck- Mark IV

GT40s Sponsor
Supporter
I agree that's the official line but my understanding was (is) that the 255 had been proven in hard running enduro events such as Indianapolis.. Whatever, it would be fantastic to see/hear Claude's 255 in 101. Perhaps Goodwood FOS or Revival this year, or will they look askance at a "recreation" no matter how faithful?
500 miles at Indy at a relatively constant RPM is not the same as 24 hours at the Sarthe with great RPM variances!

And I agree, I would love to hear a 255 at full song, I have never had the pleasure!
 
Is Claude s car sold and does he still racing ?

I hope he does as always very friendly and a real gentlemen on the track (and fast !)

Grtz
Fred
 
500 miles at Indy at a relatively constant RPM is not the same as 24 hours at the Sarthe with great RPM variances!
After chatting to some retired Ford engine engineers, the 255 as mentioned was designed to live ( operate at designed conditions ) at a narrow RPM range at Indy. The RPM's don't vary greatly as it's 2 long & 2 short straights connected to constant speed corners.

Sport cars have wildly varying tracks and mid-range torque AND top speed capability is essential.
The 1964~1966 4.7L race engine didn't have enough, so the decision to adapt the Cobra 7L to the GT provided both performance criteria.

Meanwhile Dan Gurney had been pushing Ford to develop the Weslake version of the 289/302 that John Wyer ended up using 1968/1969.
Ford even tested the Gurney Weslake 302 in a 1968 Trans-Am mustang near the end of the disastrous 1968 Tunnel Port season, it was just marginally faster than the "Cleveland 302 prototype". ( Tunnel Port 4 bolt main cap short block + prototype 351 Cleveland heads = Boss 302 ) .
Since the Cleveland engine was cheap ( production ) & the Weslake engine was expensive ( purpose built race engine ) the math was simple as to what to use for the up-comming new Trans-Am chassis for 1969.

regards,
jim p
 
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