Different engines

Neil

Active Member
#21
For Neil in Tuscon, most folks don't go for a Donovan block unless they need to...given the normally excessive power of a D-block and what appears to be at least as tight an engine area as a -40, what exhaust and trans did you opt to use, please?

You may be thinking of the Donovan aluminum blocks that were found in most top fuel dragsters and funny cars; those were patterned after the early Chrysler hemi engines- really big blocks. My Donovan aluminum block is essentially a racing version of a Chevrolet 350 small-block but with displacement increased to 383 cubic inches. This block engine is popular for sprint cars and off-shore boat racing.



My headers are Shoenfeld long-tube stepped headers, 1 7/8" pipes stepped to 2" with a 3.5" dia. collector. My transaxle is a Porsche G50-01 mated with a KEP adapter, aluminum flywheel, clutch, and pressure plate.


Regards, Neil Tucson, AZ
 

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Larry L.

Lifetime Premier Supporter
#23
I don't know about supernatural powers, but it was a pain getting my Ford 5.0 modular into the car. Custom mounts, lowering the engine, tipping it down ever so slightly, low profile pan, etc.

Never recommend going through all of that to anyone, but it can be done as I and others can attest to.
Oh, yeah, I'm sure...but, as I implied B4, it 'ain't no' toss-it-in-from-across-the-room operation!!! :cool:
 
#24
None of these one offs are easy and affect so many systems. I had to put in electric air conditioning and then had a lot of wiring issues as I needed a larger alternator, reset able breakers, a secondary fuse panel and the list is endless.......
 

Larry L.

Lifetime Premier Supporter
#25
Who'd do such a thing ;)

Aaaaaaaaaaaah! THERE you are, yeeew Blasphemer, you! :eek: I'll bet you get a big 'bang' out of 'certain people's' heads exploding the instant the clamshell goes up! lol!

There's a guy in my area who owns a '55 Chev powered by a Chrys Hemi. 'License plate reads "BLASPHEMI". You two would undoubtedly get along great! You might even be distant relatives!

I still have to chuckle every time I see that rig...
 

Howard Jones

Gold Supporter
#27
Mark, I would be very interested in how you used a electric AC unit. What type, other pieces like evap & condenser, etc. Pictures would be very cool. I have been thinking on this for quite a while and have been unable to resolve the limited compressor options and related power requirements.
 
#30
Mark, I would be very interested in how you used a electric AC unit. What type, other pieces like evap & condenser, etc. Pictures would be very cool. I have been thinking on this for quite a while and have been unable to resolve the limited compressor options and related power requirements.

Howard,

This was a bit of a problematic install. Several years ago when I started this build, the availability of an electric air conditioning unit was not simple like calling Jegs. I ended up having one that is made by Flightline AC in Oregon modify one that they offer in Cessna air planes. It was a 24 volt unit that they modified to run properly on 12 volts.

The compressor sits on the floor of the nose of the car and is plumbed in the same way as the standard Superformance unit. Electrically, it requires a 50 amp fuse. I have it wired to a secondary fuse panel that has its own 80 amp resetting breaker. Given the current requirement, I have a 140 amp alternator to power it and other accessories.

The condenser and evaporator are the factory units. The capacity is 32 onces of R34. In terms of performance, the capacity of the system is 6000 btu. The temperature at the duct is 37 degrees. It was pure luck that the condenser and evaporator are adequately sized for this compressor as the guy who originally bought it for me and tried to install it forgot to take that into consideration.
 
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