Flywheel Ring Gear

I had a situation last year where my 9t starter ate my 121t ring gear. I replaced the ring gear, and had the starter motor shaft peened for a tighter tolerance. Testing this w/o the Audi transaxle in place, it appears to me this won’t last either judging by how it’s biting. It appears to want to ride over the teeth as grinds them down, eventually to where there is nothing left to engage.

it’s an Essex V4/V6 ring gear and starter motor. The adapter that allows for the mating of the transaxle to the SBF does not allow any shimming.

A
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nybody else experience this or know of a solution?

Thanks,
Shawn
 

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Randy V

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Shawn - your starter may need to be reclocked in order to reduce the distance between crankshaft centerline and starter centerline. From one of your pictures, it appears that there are a good number of clocking options…
 
Shawn - your starter may need to be reclocked in order to reduce the distance between crankshaft centerline and starter centerline. From one of your pictures, it appears that there are a good number of clocking options…
I thought I replied, maybe sent it to you personally…the clocking does not alter how it’s centered as it’s not concentric. The alternative positions are for aligning the stater/solenoid body along side the engine.

Thanks.
 
If you cannot clock it you could make a sandwich plate out of 0.060" steel with dowel holes / sleeves to locate starter pinion in correct position for max tooth engagement, many people fail to realise the ford style starters locate in the sandwich plate which in turn is dowelled to the engine block.
 
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