Joel’s SL-C Build Thread

I went with the boss intake which has tons of room to reverse. I had to extend the MAF connector and didnt want to cut the wiring. I found this as cheap extender, I just had to shave off a small part of plastic. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B097SK52QC
I have the RCR Fuel system and I am working on the layout. I have 2 different diagrams I found in these forums. There are a couple main differences and I was wondering which is correct.
1. one uses the low pressure pump(Bosch) from the main tank the other uses the high pressure pump (Walbro) and then the opposite for the pump to the fuel rail. I assumed the high pressure pump would feed the fuel rail but....
2. one has the filter before the pump
 

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Joel K

Supporter
This post covers finishing up the fuel tank area. These are the items on the Fuel tank punch list...

  1. Fabricate side L-brackets for the front fuel tank close out panel
  2. Split the close out panel into two sections
  3. Make clearance holes for the fuel sender
  4. Make clearance hole for EVAP vent tube
  5. Cut out access hole for shifter cable conduit in the fuel tank
  6. Add Damplifier and Dynaliner

Most SLC builds have side L-brackets to seal and secure the sides of the front fuel tank close out panel. My kit did not have them already in place so mounted them on top of the panel vs. underneath like others I have seen. Pic of the passenger side L-bracket installed…
621B1678-69D2-4C41-A124-35A7C706D387.jpeg


Back on post #419 I designed a fuel tank access panel which allows the removal of the fuel tank while leaving the interior tub in place. There is enough room to remove the fuel tank, but not enough to remove the close out panel with the interior tub in place. So decided to split the front fuel tank area close out panel in two sections to allow it to be removed. Pic of the split fuel tank area close out panel…
ED1B3DE4-2977-4C9B-BCBE-3CF784B8BBB2.jpeg


Due to the way I designed the rear close out panel and the thickness of the silicone rubber pads placed under and behind the fuel tank, the top of the fuel sender interferes with the close out panel. Simply had to cut a rectangular hole to clear it.

Also, the way the front close out panel is delivered by RCR there is no pre-drilled access hole for the shifter cables. So drilled a hole for a grommet and cut a small channel which will allow the removal of the panel while leaving the shifter cables in place…
DFE5F323-693F-4429-B26E-934350F9222F.jpeg


The last hole is to provide clearance for the EVAP Vent tube. It just didn’t fit under the close out panel so not a big deal and just cut a clearance hole…
D5696AB4-8521-4523-B446-EF0C46D74380.jpeg


Any excuse to use the mill and machine up a couple caps for the clearance holes…
A85F36E7-B738-4D64-A4D2-74D906C500C7.jpeg


Added a panel joiner and decided to use the same large grommet used for the electrical harnesses to protect the shifter cables…
501F2D75-30AF-4452-A6E6-6D2327C3B57A.jpeg


Applied some Damplifier Pro to the fuel tank. Was thinking about forgoing this step in case the tank sprung a leak and needs repair. Turns out, WD-40 is very effective at releasing the butyl rubber from metal so shouldn’t be too difficult taking a piece or two off to weld the tank. Pic of the tank with the Damplifier Pro applied…
D9BA9584-5B4D-4621-B06F-A6597088579F.jpeg


Last pic of the completed fuel tank system before it gets covered up and hopefully never to be seen again…
98641955-F2AE-4948-B2D4-87D7BDBE2466.jpeg


Applied Dynaliner on the rear side of the close out panel and added Damplifier Pro and Dynaliner to the front of the the panel…

Pic of Damplifier Pro, I like to leave a border so the Dynaliner can attach to the aluminum on the edges…
5C56D35E-6BCD-4479-B5AA-5A2F65FBB8CF.jpeg


Finished fuel tank area front cover panel, probably add Dynaliner to the clearance caps…
8183D9F5-85F8-462C-84D4-ADAF3E686BC6.jpeg


A ton of work and planning, glad to move on. The fuel and EVAP systems are officially done!
 
Last edited:

Joel K

Supporter
I went with the boss intake which has tons of room to reverse. I had to extend the MAF connector and didnt want to cut the wiring. I found this as cheap extender, I just had to shave off a small part of plastic. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B097SK52QC
I have the RCR Fuel system and I am working on the layout. I have 2 different diagrams I found in these forums. There are a couple main differences and I was wondering which is correct.
1. one uses the low pressure pump(Bosch) from the main tank the other uses the high pressure pump (Walbro) and then the opposite for the pump to the fuel rail. I assumed the high pressure pump would feed the fuel rail but....
2. one has the filter before the pump

Jim,

Good looking intake. I can’t help you with the fuel system setup. My setup is very different. Lots of different configs people use. If you bought the RCR System I would shoot Bill an email and see what he recommends.
 
Joel, I am so sorry, I thought I was posting on my build thread :(
I have your thread open for reference so much I accidently posted on yours. I dont see a way to delete it, sorry again
 

Joel K

Supporter
The SLC is a cool ride and I hope the AC system will blow “Cold As Ice” with a leak free system…
IMG_2011.jpeg


This post covers crimping the AC Hoses. I debated bringing the hoses to an AC shop, but was concerned they would not be clocked properly so purchased a hydraulic crimping tool from Amazon.

This brand is called ISOBAD, but looks like the same product is sold under various brands. Anyway, it was relatively inexpensive at $115. It comes with all the die sizes you need and a hose cutter which worked really well…
IMG_2010.jpeg


I applied a light coat of grease on each ferule to help the crimper work consistently. Seemed to work very well. The crimps are even and well defined. Close up of a #6 hose crimp…
IMG_0585.jpeg


Evaporator #6 and #10 hoses crimped…
IMG_0545.jpeg


The #6 hose connecting the drier to the evaporator was a little tricky. When you Crimp the hoses it tends to increase the length by about an 1/8”. So to make this hose, I crimped one side then cut it so it was 1/8” shorter than needed and it worked out perfect. It took two tries…
IMG_0576.jpeg


Compressor #8 and #10 hoses crimped…
IMG_0584.jpeg


#8 and #10 rear hoses which connect to bulkhead fittings crimped…
IMG_0580.jpeg


#10 front hose connecting to bulkhead fitting crimped…
IMG_0581.jpeg


#8 front hose connected to the bulkhead fitting crimped…
IMG_0577.jpeg



To my eye, all these crimps look really good. Fingers crossed the system is leak free! That was actually a fun task.
 

Joel K

Supporter
Finally at the point of installing the electrical components. This thread shows the approach taken to install the battery cables, fuse blocks, and grounding cables.

Here is a video on the process…
Superlite SL-C Build 111 - Master Fuse and Power Cable Install

The battery is installed on the driver side rear of the chassis. The idea was to keep it as close to the starter as possible to insure maximum current and avoid hard starting of a hot engine. Pic of the battery install…
IMG_0779.jpeg


I wanted to have independent fuses for the starter, alternator and the master fuse block in the passenger compartment. The master fuse block will supply power to the PDM and other non-switched components. Here is a diagram of the fuse layout..
SLC Master Fuse Layout.png


Space is always at a premium. Found this clever Blue Sea Systems bus bar fuse block for Marine Rated Battery Fuses(MRBF). It’s compact and has a transparent cover to visually inspect the fuses.

For power distribution to various outputs I am using the AIM Solid State Power Distribution Module. It can distribute a maximum of 120 AMPs across 32 outputs. There are a handful of components which require high current and wanted them not to go through the PDM. For this I needed a master fuse block.

I found a nice and compact master fuse block from Littelfuse PN #880073. It’s has 3 MIDI Fuses and 4 Blade fuses and is rated for 350 Amps.

Pic of the fuse blocks and labels for each fuse…
FullSizeRender.jpeg


Now time to assemble the power and ground cables. Here is a list of the supplies used:
AMZCNC Hydraulic Crimping Tool and Cable Cutter - Amazon
Mega Lugs - CE Auto Electric Supply
Flexible Battery Cable - CE Auto Electric Supply
Extra Thick Heat Shrink Hose - CE Auto Electric Supply
Rubber Boot Ends - CE Auto Electric Supply
3/8” battery cable bulkhead - CE Auto Electric Supply

Fabricated a bracket and mounted the Blue Sea fuse block above the battery. It’s easily accessible in this location…
IMG_0415.jpeg


Here are the fuse ratings and wire gauges used:
1)Starter - 300 AMP, 2 gauge wire
2)Alternator - 200 AMP, 2 gauge wire
3)Master Fuse Block - 250 AMP, 1/0 gauge wire

To power the master fuse block, ran a positive cable from the Blue Sea MRBF block to a bulkhead located on the driver side interior tub close out panel…
IMG_0568.jpeg


Pic from inside of the chassis. Cable connects the bulkhead to the master fuse block…
IMG_0601.jpeg


The fuse block gets mounted to the upper driver side chassis. Selected this spot to keep the cables hidden from view and it is still easily accessible…
IMG_0594.jpeg


Here are the master fuse types and ratings used:
1)PDM - 125 AMP MIDI fuse, 4 gauge wire
2)EPAS - 40 AMP MIDI fuse, 10 gauge wire
3)Sound System Amplifier - 60 AMP MIDI fuse, 4 gauge wire
4)Radiator Fan #1 - 30 AMP ATO fuse, 10 gauge wire
5)Radiator Fan #2 - 30 AMP ATO fuse, 10 gauge wire
6)Compustar PKE - 25 AMP ATO fuse, 12 gauge wire
7)Misc - 15 AMP ATO fuse, 12 gauge wire

Pic of the Battery and some of the cables attached. You see how the MRBF Block attaches to the battery, chassis and engine block ground wires(2 gauge wire), and Master Fuse Power Cable…
IMG_0641.jpeg


Ground cable to the engine block…
IMG_0654.jpeg


Next up is to locate the rest of the electrical components.
 
Last edited:

Neil

Supporter
Finally at the point of installing the electrical components. This thread shows the approach taken to install the battery cables, fuse blocks, and grounding cables.

Here is a video on the process…
Superlite SL-C Build 111 - Master Fuse and Power Cable Install

The battery is installed on the driver side rear of the chassis. The idea was to keep it as close to the starter as possible to insure maximum current and avoid hard starting of a hot engine. Pic of the battery install…
View attachment 137762

I wanted to have independent fuses for the starter, alternator and the master fuse block in the passenger compartment. The master fuse block will supply power to the PDM and other non-switched components. Here is a diagram of the fuse layout..l
View attachment 137763

Space is always at a premium. Found this clever Blue Sea Systems bus bar fuse block for Marine Rated Battery Fuses(MRBF). It’s compact and has a transparent cover to visually inspect the fuses.

For power distribution to various outputs I am using the AIM Solid State Power Distribution Module. It can distribute a maximum of 120 AMPs across 32 outputs. There are a handful of components which require high current and wanted them not to go through the PDM. For this I needed a master fuse block.

I found a nice and compact master fuse block from Littelfuse PN #880073. It’s has 3 MIDI Fuses and 4 Blade fuses and is rated for 350 Amps.

Pic of the fuse blocks and labels for each fuse…
View attachment 137764

Now time to assemble the power and ground cables. Here is a list of the supplies used:
AMZCNC Hydraulic Crimping Tool and Cable Cutter - Amazon
Mega Lugs - CE Auto Electric Supply
Flexible Battery Cable - CE Auto Electric Supply
Extra Thick Heat Shrink Hose - CE Auto Electric Supply
Rubber Boot Ends - CE Auto Electric Supply
3/8” battery cable bulkhead - CE Auto Electric Supply

Fabricated a bracket and mounted the Blue Sea fuse block above the battery. It’s easily accessible in this location…
View attachment 137765

Here are the fuse ratings and wire gauges used:
1)Starter - 300 AMP, 2 gauge wire
2)Alternator - 200 AMP, 2 gauge wire
3)Master Fuse Block - 250 AMP, 1/0 gauge wire

To power the master fuse block, ran a positive cable from the Blue Sea MRBF block to a bulkhead located on the driver side interior tub close out panel…
View attachment 137766

Pic from inside of the chassis. Cable connects the bulkhead to the master fuse block…
View attachment 137767

The fuse block gets mounted to the upper driver side chassis. Selected this spot to keep the cables hidden from view and it is still easily accessible…
View attachment 137771

Here are the master fuse types and ratings used:
1)PDM - 125 AMP MIDI fuse, 4 gauge wire
2)EPAS - 40 AMP MIDI fuse, 10 gauge wire
3)Sound System Amplifier - 60 AMP MIDI fuse, 4 gauge wire
4)Radiator Fan #1 - 30 AMP ATO fuse, 10 gauge wire
5)Radiator Fan #2 - 30 AMP ATO fuse, 10 gauge wire
6)Compustar PKE - 25 AMP ATO fuse, 12 gauge wire
7)Misc - 15 AMP ATO fuse, 12 gauge wire

Pic of the Battery and some of the cables attached. You see how the MRBF Block attaches to the battery, chassis and engine block ground wires(2 gauge wire), and Master Fuse Power Cable…
View attachment 137769

Ground cable to the engine block…
View attachment 137770

Next up is to locate the rest of the electrical components.
With the Blue Sea fuse block directly above the battery, how do you remove the battery?
 
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