LBC Build Log - Apex

I don't have much to post since I don't have my kit yet or an eclipse (hopefully soon). Here is some of the prep work I did on suspension parts. I decided to change out my bushings on the control arms. While I was at it decided to paint them. Lots of degreasing, scrubbing, and taping involved (no blast cabinet). I also ground off the corvette logo on the calipers and painted them with VHT satin black caliper paint then vht gloss clear. Control arms and spindles etc got etching primer, vht graphite metallic wheel paint, and gloss clear wheel paint.





Regarding the bushings, I decided to switch these out because many people swear by the handling improvements on LS1tech.com. I was between two brands of poly - VB&P and Pfadt (now afe) as they both come with new hardware. I went with the Pfadt even though more $$ because they have grooves in the poly that better hold the grease and reduces the awful Squeak notorious with poly bushings. For those interested there is a new Delrin option also from ridetech ($$$).

aFe Bushings

This thread explains an easy way to remove the stock bushings along with free loaner tool part #'s to get the job done Bushing removal thread - Corvetteforum

While I was painting the calipers I decided to do a rebuild. If you haven't done this before an easy way to remove the piston without damaging it with pliers is to remove one of the bolts and blow compressed air into the caliper. The piston will pop out (with force so place something in front of piston). My pistons had no rust and didn't need replacement.

Front Rebuild kit
Front Hardware kit
 
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I am currently working on my Engine mods for my LS1 so once I get the chassis together I can drop it in like all you crate engine guys. For budget reasons I'm keeping the stock 241 heads and hand porting them myself (long term project :sweatdrop:) and also keeping the LS6 intake and throttle body for now and will do light clean up porting on each. So only thing the engine is getting really is Valvetrain:

A cam from tick - Street Heat st2, Springs - BT racing, Trunion kit for stock rockers - BT racing, 11/32 pushrods -Manton, and lifters - Morel oem replacements. I had a wobble in balancer so getting a 10% reduction pulley as well - ATI. I may add rod bolts as well as these are known to be a weak link in the LS1 however there are mixed feeling about doing so without resizing rod cap.

The goal with the cam is to have torque all the through the RPM range as opposed to one with max torque that drops off. This will better complement the way the car is driven given the Porsche gearing of the G96. Should still be very drivable with only 7 degrees overlap. I always like video's IDLE CLIP
 
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I make the poly suspension and shock bushings for all of the years Dodge Vipers as a side gig. I tested many types of grease before settling on one (since the biggest argument against them is sqeeking).
Silicone started to sqeek within 3 hours on my test. Grease supplied by another poly manufacturer started to sqeek in an hour, and any other thing I found recommended sqeeked within 12 hours.
I then tested a Valvoline product called Cerulean. It is designed for king pin bushings on heavy equipment, so excellent anti-washout properties and it sticks to air! After one week of testing, it still didn't sqeek and literally had 1/2 the resistance of any other grease. I send a few ounces out with every kit and ixnay the warranty if customer does not use it. I now use it in all of my ball joints (you can instantly feel the resistance cut in half!) and other serviceable suspension etc parts.


Stay away from graphite impregnated bushings. The graphite that will lube the bushing is only what settles to the outside of the bushing. Yet, the whole bushing has it in the mix, so you get compromised strength to the poly.
All you needed to know about bushings and didn't even ask for it. Haha. ;)

Parts look good, have fun with the project!
 
I'm with you on the graphite stuff!
I have heard of Cerulean , but never tried it.
Thanks for the tip!
 
I then tested a Valvoline product called Cerulean. It is designed for king pin bushings on heavy equipment, so excellent anti-washout properties and it sticks to air! After one week of testing, it still didn't sqeek and literally had 1/2 the resistance of any other grease.
Good Info!! I may give that stuff a shot...any issues mixing this grease with other grease? I decided to keep all the stock ball joints for now (50k miles on them), and may give them a shot of that Cerulean as well. They already have some stress cracks on the boot (don't look like they go through) but budget didn't allow for replacing them all yet. Thinking of trying to lengthen their life with some black urethane sealant like they use for windshields (in the cracks). Any better suggestions? FYI to anyone buying used suspension...I Honestly think I may have exasperated this by moving them around beyond what they see in use when checking to see if they had any play. Keep that in mind.
 
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Unlike my control arm ball joint boots that were in OK shape my tie rod end boots were pretty much shot. However unlike the ball joints on the control arms the tie rod end boots can be replaced if the joints are still good at vb&p.
 
the Graphite Metallic looks amazing, nicely done!! I really want to build on of these but I am not sold on the body work yet, I need to make it up to superlite and see one in person.
 
Good Info!! I may give that stuff a shot...any issues mixing this grease with other grease? I decided to keep all the stock ball joints for now (50k miles on them), and may give them a shot of that Cerulean as well. They already have some stress cracks on the boot (don't look like they go through) but budget didn't allow for replacing them all yet. Thinking of trying to lengthen their life with some black urethane sealant like they use for windshields (in the cracks). Any better suggestions? FYI to anyone buying used suspension...I Honestly think I may have exasperated this by moving them around beyond what they see in use when checking to see if they had any play. Keep that in mind.
No issues with mixing it, but I would push all of the old stuff out if it is a used part. It is very sticky stuff and even the slightest film of it will still be slick as snot. If you think of a king pin, it is exactly the same as a suspension bushing in operation. Meaning direct friction contact. No bearings or other methods of eliminating a drag coefficeint. It's bonding ability over other greases keeps a film between the moving parts. That is the problem I had with other greases or silicone. It just pushed out when you pushed the bushing in, and in use, the twisting motion of the bushing works the grease out. Then you get poly against metal and it tries to grab annnndddd, SQEEK. Lol.
What you aim for is to have the bushing spin at half rate of the actual movement. It helps against wear when both the inner bushing is moving and the poly bushing itself. In all of the other tests, the bushing would lock to the center bushing, or the casing, allowing only one friction surface. The cerulean allowed it to work freely. Same concept as any other type roller bearing.
It really is quite amazing to put in a new or old ball joint that already has grease in it, or broken in/used part, and the pressure needed to move it is cut in half. It's my little secret weapon. lol.
Yes, I did put a film of it on all of the rod ends on my SLC. :thumbsup:
 
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Scott, your parts look great. I really like the route of making donor items look new and made for the car.

Have you decided on paint scheme for the finished car?
 
Scott, your parts look great. I really like the route of making donor items look new and made for the car.

Have you decided on paint scheme for the finished car?
Currently intend to paint the car balloon white which I believe was first a Lamborghini color. Here's a Gallardo in Balloon White. I also want to incorporate a black roof if possible.

I will be running F14's with the Black Graphite which is similar to my suspension color but since it has a smoke clear powder coating it looks black at certain angles/indirect light. Costs a little extra because three layers of powder coat but I liked the color.



I also plan to incorporate a GT style wing. Going cheap here. URAS seem to have some pretty affordable. But I haven't looked much. I think I'm going to get the high wing brackets so I can mount them under the car on the frame instead of on the fiberglass. That way I'll end up with a mid height wing that doesn't just press down on the body.


 
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Waiting for all my engine mod parts to come in...meantime more part prep...

Cleaned up intake a little


And painted


This is up next, porting throttle body
 
G2 is good stuff and lays nice and flat but does take a little extra work to paint on. Plus you know it's safe temperature. I wanted to make sure temperature wise everything I was using was good so I searched around a little bit. Several posts showed that on a hot car valve cover temperatures on the LS didn't exceed 150* tested with infrared therm (this while headers were around 650*). obviously this would not be the case after being on the track.

This is the stuff I used on the intake manifold. This paint is basically 250* paint. The valve covers will be painted same as heads and engine with 900* VHT engine enamel.
 
Scott, I easily de-greased, prepped and sprayed it on.
The VHT seems not to like any solvents after cured.
 

Keith

Moderator
As a matter of interest, did you consider that a highly polished surface in the fuel delivery area can cause 'fuel dropout' and actually hurt performance? *

A good rub with some coarse grit will do the job though!

Edit: *Not to mention drive-ability...
 
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As a matter of interest, did you consider that a highly polished surface in the fuel delivery area can cause 'fuel dropout' and actually hurt performance? *

A good rub with some coarse grit will do the job though!


Edit: *Not to mention drive-ability...
I just want to make sure I understand. Are you mentioning here for purposes of future information (when i'm doing the heads) or are you refering about the throttle body thats polished. My understanding is that the throttle body was far enough upstream to not cause issues with fuel dropout and polishing only slightly helps in throttle response. Certainly in the intake runners I'm leaving roughed (Carbide cut only on short turn - maybe a once over with a rough cartridge roll on walls and roof).

Any additional info is greatly appreciated!!

Edit: I said intake runner...but meant intake port of head. I'm not touching the LS6 intake manifold whatsoever...other then wiping out oil and painting.
 
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Keith

Moderator
I understood that it was the whole intake track from trumpet to chamber but you are probably correct. Here's an interesting piece that seems to back up that premise, however, if it's good for the head and intake manifold/port then I would assume the same philosophy should logically apply to the part of the intake trumpet below the injector nozzle.

Sorry if it clogs up your log - if it does, let me know and I'll delete it..

Engine Intake Porting
Know the facts before you modify your engine.

Smooth porting of the intake tract, in nearly every instance (save a few engines designed to run at full throttle all the time), COSTS HORSEPOWER. That's right.. that nice mirror finish that makes those ports look so sexy, is in most cases causing you to lose power, and in more extreme cases, make an engine non-streetable. Lets look at what scientific research has to say about the mechanics of engine breathing and power production.

Atomization and Vaporization
Before gasoline can be burned, it must be vaporized. Vaporization is the process of a liquid changing to a gas state, and this change only occurs once the liquid has exceeded it's boiling point.

In the case of water, it boils at 212F when at sea level. At a lower atmospheric pressure, it boils at a lower temperature. Thus, the lower the pressure within the intake tract at the point of fuel introduction, combined with an acceptable air stream temperature, the better the vaporization of the fuel, and efficiency of the burn.

In most passenger car engines, heat is applied to the intake manifold to raise the air stream temperature for better vaporization. However, this does cost some top-end power, as the higher temperature mixture, also has a lower density (and thus, less fuel/oxygen). It's a trade-off between street drive-ability and maximum power. The power loss in passenger engines is considered acceptable due to the smoother running of the engine, at part throttle. In a true race engine, every measure is taken to remove heat from the intake tract, because a cooler, more dense mixture means more horsepower, at the expense of low-end power and drive-ability.

There are number of factors that can cause poor fuel vaporization;

Intake tract pressure too high (raises boiling point of the fuel)
Air stream temperature too low (below the boiling point of fuel)
Air stream velocity too slow (fuel will drop out of the stream)
Any of these will reduce power output, drive-ability (throttle response), and efficiency (mileage).

Mixture Speed and Turbulence
Let's focus on the mixture velocity (speed) and turbulence, as these are directly affected by the design and modification of the cylinder head's intake ports.

The 'art' of cylinder head port design, is often considered a black art, and as such, many myths exist regarding cylinder head design and porting. One of the most common is that polishing the ports is the trick to make a head work. In reality, NOTHING is further from the truth. A polish does nothing to increase the power of an engine, and in fact, can reduce power output.

This can be proven only on a dyno. A test conducted by engine builder David Ray, using two cylinder heads, proved this point. Head #1 was highly worked over, and sported a very nice looking set of polished ports. Head #2 was worked over only slightly in the valve bowl area, but flowed the same amount of air as Head #1 on the flow bench. When put together, and run on the dyno, the results where amazing. The rough port Head #2, produced it's best horsepower with a secondary barrel main jet two sizes smaller than that required for maximum horsepower using Head #1. The engine also produced more horsepower on less fuel!

What is happening in the above case? The engine is suffering from fuel dropout.

Fuel Dropout
Fuel dropout is the loss of fuel from the air stream, due to either condensation (temperature drops below the boiling point), or loss of speed and turbulence. In both cases, droplets of fuel will literally 'fall' out of the air stream onto the walls and floor of your intake port. If your head and manifold retain enough heat, it will once again boil and attempt to re-enter the air stream.

This is basically a case of poor vaporization (the three primary causes of which we looked at, above). Poor vaporization means less power output per once of fuel consumed (not necessarily burned, read on to find out how this happens).

Why a polished port, costs you power
There are a number of reasons a nice looking polished port can make your engine produce less horsepower than it did in stock form, but here are the two that are most relevant to this discussion.

Loss of velocity. Over-working the port and making it too large is not a good thing.
Fuel will not properly puddle on intake walls or floor.
In both cases, the end result is the same. Fuel dropout causes the collection of liquid fuel on the walls/floor of the intake tract, where it will now easily flow down the port, directly into the cylinder as a liquid, which the engine will not be able to properly burn, causing lost power, wasted gas, and more emissions (that can clog your catalytic converter, causing even more power to be lost).

So why does a rough port work better? It's really very simple. As fuel drops out of the air stream, it collects on the walls and floor of the intake port, and puddles. However, since the port is not smooth, the gas is far less likely to flow into the cylinder as a liquid, before it can be re-vaporized by heat in the head/intake, or be picked up by the turbulent air within the port.

So, as I'm sure you can now see, even though it 'seems' like a polished port will get you that power you so badly want, in nearly every case, it's all show, and no go.


 
No problem...the more info the better. That's consistant with everything I've heard and read with porting. I was just reading this article last week...Larry Meaux on Porting. The only polishing I plan was on the TB and maybe very light polishing on the head exhaust port.

This combustion chamber is a little extreme though...but hey if it works.

 
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