Lucas toggle switch mom/off/mom?

Looking for help here.
I want a lucas switch as topic, but having a hard time finding it.
It is gonna operate the electric e-brake, and it have to be momentary for the IVA.(stupid rules)
 

Neil

Supporter
Looking for help here.
I want a lucas switch as topic, but having a hard time finding it.
It is gonna operate the electric e-brake, and it have to be momentary for the IVA.(stupid rules)
Does the switch have to be Lucas? How much current are you switching?
 

Mike Pass

Supporter
Try RS Components. They list loads of toggle switches - over 1000 listed - they should have what you want. They have just about everything electrical and electronic.
I have used them for years
Cheers
Mike
 
Try RS Components. They list loads of toggle switches - over 1000 listed - they should have what you want. They have just about everything electrical and electronic.
I have used them for years
Cheers
Mike
Thanks Mike, found what i was looking for.
Switch 206-7002 (mom-off-mom) and lever atleast looks like lucas type
 

Neil

Supporter
Still unanswered- "How much current are you switching?"

Switches and relays have ratings for their contacts that include the current carrying capacity in Amps, the open-circuit voltage switching in Volts, and the type of current, AC or DC. In automotive applications we are usually working with 12V DC circuits. Direct current is the most severe application for switch & relay contacts as the current is going in only direction when the contacts make and break; this causes erosion from one contact to the other since contact metal is transferred to the same contact every time. With AC, the erosion averages out since the current carries contact material back and forth each time it makes or breaks.

Switching a resistive load such as an electric heater, etc, is the most benign application. Switching a light bulb requires the contacts to carry a very high inrush current but it then tapers off as the tungsten filament heats up. An inductive load such as a motor or a solenoid places a high voltage stress across the contacts when they open and the arc will hasten erosion and failure. either of these latter two conditions can cause the contacts to weld themselves shut. Manufacturers also optimize their contact material alloys for particular applications so just choosing a switch for its size or looks may result in an early failure. Sorry to carry on but sometimes a little more information can prevent problems from developing later.
 

Neil

Supporter
The amps isn't important in my case.
All switches are either low current signals or triggers relays.
A relay coil is an inductive load; it will generate a high voltage across the switch contacts when it turns off the current. If the relay does not have an internal clamp diode I'd suggest placing a 1N4004 across the relay coil. Very low current loads ("Dry- Contact loads") need gold flashed contacts to function reliably or they eventually become intermittent. Switches seem like such simple things but there are a lot of subtle things going on when you look into it in detail.
 
A relay coil is an inductive load; it will generate a high voltage across the switch contacts when it turns off the current. If the relay does not have an internal clamp diode I'd suggest placing a 1N4004 across the relay coil. Very low current loads ("Dry- Contact loads") need gold flashed contacts to function reliably or they eventually become intermittent. Switches seem like such simple things but there are a lot of subtle things going on when you look into it in detail.
All relays are bought with internal diodes to quench that spike.
I know my electronics, so no problems there, just wasn't able to find a suitable switch for the last function needed for my instrument panel.
 
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