Safety wire

Clayton

Supporter
Correctly done wiring is beautiful.

The only one I’d pass as an Aircraft Mechanic is Claytons...and for some reason lots of his work I’ve seen on his car looks like he may be involved in aircraft maintenance at some level.

The FAA’s website has the book for A&P mechanics it’s called the 43:13. It has a section just on safety wiring.

Practice, practice, practice, and after lots of “Safety wire cuts” in your skin and bleeding fingers, you’ll all be able to do an “Airworthy” safety
Thanks Scott
Yeah I’m a LAME in Oz, equivalent to your A&P.
Too many bleeding fingers not to curl the tails...

Clayton
 

Clayton

Supporter
Glenn
The angle of the pic does make it look like that, but it is at the best possible position I can get.
Here’s a dead on pic of the F/L.

Clayton

6AEC5E29-D4C1-4D73-AB76-BBEB3DD49293.jpeg
 
Scott and I are both aviation mechanics. Safety wire is not meant to keep a bolt or nut torqued. It's there to stop the un-torqued bolt or nut from completely backing off of the fixture it's meant to fasten, and departing the fixture. It's there to prevent a spinner that has become un-torqued from completely spinning off the hub. As stated, the torsional momentum of the wheel should keep the spinner torqued.....but weird things happen.

Stainless safety wire will stretch and break easily. Don't rely on it to keep it torqued.

The pigtail is simply to keep from poking stainless through your fingers.

As Scott said, the smart way would be to wire from the wheel to the inside of the spinner. This will prevent road debris from breaking the wire, and conceal it better. However, the authentic wire was at the tip. Functionally, it makes little difference.

If I was racing with wheel changes during the race, I'd put a clip on the end of the safety wire to clip into a hole in the spinner tip, after torquing. When racing motorcycles, we often did this with things like the oil drain bolt, axle bolts, etc. It made for a quick swap while still having the safety wire function. So, the safety wire would be loose with a clip on the end, clipped into the fixture.

nJENNHv.jpg


The point being, this is about authentic aesthetics. As long as the safety wire is not broken it will do its job.
 

Michael

Supporter
Licensed A&P here also, although I haven't worked in that capacity for quite some time. Began my career working for P&WA in East Hartford, CT at the production test facility, that's where I learned how to properly apply safety wire. The worst was the ultra-heavy gauge hi-temp coated wire...very tough stuff to work into cast crevices...o_O

Jimmy, the only concern I'd have with your snap ring idea is that over time the wire will work harden and crack. If it were re-applied before each race though, that would probably be okay.
 
Licensed A&P here also, although I haven't worked in that capacity for quite some time. Began my career working for P&WA in East Hartford, CT at the production test facility, that's where I learned how to properly apply safety wire. The worst was the ultra-heavy gauge hi-temp coated wire...very tough stuff to work into cast crevices...o_O

Jimmy, the only concern I'd have with your snap ring idea is that over time the wire will work harden and crack. If it were re-applied before each race though, that would probably be okay.
Agreed.
 

Clayton

Supporter
Licensed A&P here also, although I haven't worked in that capacity for quite some time. Began my career working for P&WA in East Hartford, CT at the production test facility, that's where I learned how to properly apply safety wire. The worst was the ultra-heavy gauge hi-temp coated wire...very tough stuff to work into cast crevices...o_O

Jimmy, the only concern I'd have with your snap ring idea is that over time the wire will work harden and crack. If it were re-applied before each race though, that would probably be okay.
I assume you were using inconel wire inside the turbines ?
Been told not to pick yourself with that stuff...

Clayton
 

Michael

Supporter
I assume you were using inconel wire inside the turbines ?
Been told not to pick yourself with that stuff...

Clayton
Honestly Clayton, I don't remember what the base metal was, it was a million years ago and details elude me at this point. I do remember being cautioned about it, but there was no way to work with it without leaving marks and a blood trail. I think the caution was related more to the coating on the wire, not the inconel, but again, fuzzy memory.
 

Clayton

Supporter
Honestly Clayton, I don't remember what the base metal was, it was a million years ago and details elude me at this point. I do remember being cautioned about it, but there was no way to work with it without leaving marks and a blood trail. I think the caution was related more to the coating on the wire, not the inconel, but again, fuzzy memory.
Was told there was traces of arsenic on the wire, so try not to prick yourself with it.
Only had to use S/S wire myself.

Clayton
 
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