Side window installation

On the SL-C's do most of you guys install the side windows with nutserts for ease of removal?

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Howard Jones

Supporter
I did mine with 4-40 button-head stainless socket screws and used nylon washers under the head. I drilled and taped (CAREFULLY!) the door material and simply screwed in the fastener. First, lay out your hole pattern on the window and drill clearance holes. Then use the window as a pattern to locate the mounting holes in the door. You can do the headlight covers this way also.

I like this method because it allows for repair if necessary. All you would need to do is fill the hole with a dab of epoxy, allow it to harden, and redrill and tap. It also requires a very small hole. This gives you more area around the edges of the parent material, both window and fiberglass body, and makes it stronger near the edges. You really don't have a lot of room to work with, especially around the headlight covers and the top of the side windows. I did both my GT40 and SLC this way and the GT40 has had no problems for more than 20 years.

Don't place fasteners in the extreme corners of the Lexan. Leave at least a 1-inch distance to the edge of the Lexan in the other three directions other than the one facing the edge of the window. This will prevent cracking through the mounting hole to two of the edges.

Oh and wait until after the body is fit to its FINAL position before you install windows. NONE of these things want to flex.
 

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ok, thank you for the reply. Maybe Ill just do the lower portion with the nutserts since those windows will potentially be removed often.
 
I used floating aircraft style floating nutserts which are secured to the door with countersunk rivets. The polycarbonate window expands and contracts with heat and if you lock the window down the window will likely crack at the bolt hole locations.
 

Neil

Supporter
I used floating aircraft style floating nutserts which are secured to the door with countersunk rivets. The polycarbonate window expands and contracts with heat and if you lock the window down the window will likely crack at the bolt hole locations.
Floating nut plates is a good idea. Another method used to cope with differential thermal expansion is to drill oversized holes . This will not work with countersunk screws, of course.
 

Ian

Supporter
I have read that nylon screws are an option? I am wondering if anyone has done this and how they held up. Interested for the added safety of it.
 
I use thumbnuts. Available from McMaster. There's enough friction between the screws and the windows that I can loosen the thumb nuts from inside the car if I want to remove them without having an allen key handy. There may be enough to tighten as well but I've always final torqued with an allan key when installing my windows. Through holes in the fiberglass, countersinks in the poly, and washers between the nuts and door panel.

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You should use anchor nuts to allow for expansion and contraction of the window. This will prevent the window from cracking at the bolting locations.

NUT,FLOATING ANCHOR MS21059L08
 
You should use anchor nuts to allow for expansion and contraction of the window. This will prevent the window from cracking at the bolting locations.

NUT,FLOATING ANCHOR MS21059L08

Honestly, haven't had any issues with that across 4-5 years and multiple seasons. Have been in 40F-110F conditions. Oversize the holes a little if it's a concern.
 
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