Aaron's SL-C build...

That is a similar product to the PPG DX Roadguard that I have used. Nice find.

Good luck on the go-kart session. I am envious of your progress, I am dying to get back in my shop to work on mine. Have not touched it in a month.
I’m jealous of it as well.. I’ve done a ton of custom fabrication and tackled some of the harder delemas with the SL-C. Mine isn’t for sale…. . Not unless someone wants to pony up for the 2000 hours of labor and sweat equity. You can’t build one of these in three months alone. Not even 3 years in my opinion.. I took a couple of years off so I’m in it for 5-6 years and I’m not to paint yet.. Paint this winter.. I want to drive it…
 

Neil

Supporter
Aaron, it looks like that type of air inlet will not be very efficient. The vent location is largely within the boundary layer so the airflow won't be as high as it would be if it were raised up a little.
 

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Howard Jones

Supporter
I've done some "oil drops" airflow studies for this opening. The flow separates pretty much at the edge of the windshield/roof and it appears that quite a bit of turbulence is present on the roof in front of the duct inlet. The top edge of the scoop is in enough clear air to pickup airflow and create a small localized small high-pressure area. This is just enough to force some airflow into the duct.

From the windshield edge, the drops migrate reward for about 2 inches and then start to flow in all directions for about another 3-4 inches. The drops tend to stop moving for the next couple of inches and then at the entrance of the duct they begin to flow towards it from a couple of inches out.

I did a row of drops at the other end of the duct in the engine room and there is airflow out of the duct so it is moving air.

Below is a picture of a Porsche in a wind tunnel. The roofline is similar to an SLC in that the window angle is fairly steep and then transitions into a much more flat roof. You can see the separation at the windshield very clearly. Picture our SLC roof scoop right in this spot and you can see what I am talking about.

One of my future experiments is to form a forward-facing extension and attempt to pick up higher pressure airflow at the edge of the windshield. I am pretty sure this will work but it will be ugly.

The second picture is a good example of the extended scoop duct idea.
 

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Aaron, it looks like that type of air inlet will not be very efficient. The vent location is largely within the boundary layer so the airflow won't be as high as it would be if it were raised up a little.
It’s the factory roof vent / opening. All I’m doing at this time is making a trim piece for it. Enjoy redesigning your roof vent and share your findings with everyone.
 
I've done some "oil drops" airflow studies for this opening. The flow separates pretty much at the edge of the windshield/roof and it appears that quite a bit of turbulence is present on the roof in front of the duct inlet. The top edge of the scoop is in enough clear air to pickup airflow and create a small localized small high-pressure area. This is just enough to force some airflow into the duct.

From the windshield edge, the drops migrate reward for about 2 inches and then start to flow in all directions for about another 3-4 inches. The drops tend to stop moving for the next couple of inches and then at the entrance of the duct they begin to flow towards it from a couple of inches out.

I did a row of drops at the other end of the duct in the engine room and there is airflow out of the duct so it is moving air.

Below is a picture of a Porsche in a wind tunnel. The roofline is similar to an SLC in that the window angle is fairly steep and then transitions into a much more flat roof. You can see the separation at the windshield very clearly. Picture our SLC roof scoop right in this spot and you can see what I am talking about.

One of my future experiments is to form a forward-facing extension and attempt to pick up higher pressure airflow at the edge of the windshield. I am pretty sure this will work but it will be ugly.

The second picture is a good example of the extended scoop duct idea.
That roof vent on the Porsche looks great
What else would you expect..
 

Randy V

Staff member
Admin
Lifetime Supporter
One of my future experiments is to form a forward-facing extension and attempt to pick up higher pressure airflow at the edge of the windshield. I am pretty sure this will work but it will be ugly.
Not an old problem statement when it comes to managing the airflow / shockwaves on supersonic aircraft... F16 Falcon as an example. So, what I’m trying to say here is that you’d be in good and well respected company with your scoop extensions...
 

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Not an old problem statement when it comes to managing the airflow / shockwaves on supersonic aircraft... F16 Falcon as an example. So, what I’m trying to say here is that you’d be in good and well respected company with your scoop extensions...

A later project…. Fortunately I have access to many tools and machines.
 
I’ve been working last few days on repairing a few wiring snafus with my go cart ride..

1) I’m using the GM fan relay to activate the infinity box fan input to the master cell and the GM fan relay wasn’t coming on. At this point I think it was corrosion on the prongs of the relay or potentially a bad cookant temp sending unit but they both tested good.. The relay circuit works now..

2). My M I L lamp is on even though the OBD scan tool shows that there are no codes present in the ECM..

3). My fuel level gauge was working correctly and all the sudden quit. Pegged to full.
 
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