Fuel Sender GTD

Hi guys after checking that my fuel gauge was working on my GTD 40 1991 im now thinking the sender is not working can anyone tell me where i would get one from please

Cheers

Paul
 

Eddy McClements

Supporter
You wouldnt happen to know which one i would need
Do you have a close-up picture of the gauge (or gauges)? For example, I'm using a couple of these gauges:-



which requires a sender with resistance ranging from 20 ohms (full) to 260 ohms (empty), like this Triumph TR unit:-



The sender arm can bent bent and shortened to match the tank depth, providing overall travel remains the same. The Smiths gauges also need a 10v input from a Lucas voltage stabiliser or equivalent. They don't work properly on the variable 12 to 14 volts of a vehicle supply.




But you need to start with identifying the gauge, then you'll know the sender resistance range you need. Finally, this might help:

 
Do you have a close-up picture of the gauge (or gauges)? For example, I'm using a couple of these gauges:-



which requires a sender with resistance ranging from 20 ohms (full) to 260 ohms (empty), like this Triumph TR unit:-



The sender arm can bent bent and shortened to match the tank depth, providing overall travel remains the same. The Smiths gauges also need a 10v input from a Lucas voltage stabiliser or equivalent. They don't work properly on the variable 12 to 14 volts of a vehicle supply.




But you need to start with identifying the gauge, then you'll know the sender resistance range you need. Finally, this might help:

Do you have a close-up picture of the gauge (or gauges)? For example, I'm using a couple of these gauges:-



which requires a sender with resistance ranging from 20 ohms (full) to 260 ohms (empty), like this Triumph TR unit:-



The sender arm can bent bent and shortened to match the tank depth, providing overall travel remains the same. The Smiths gauges also need a 10v input from a Lucas voltage stabiliser or equivalent. They don't work properly on the variable 12 to 14 volts of a vehicle supply.




But you need to start with identifying the gauge, then you'll know the sender resistance range you need. Finally, this might help:

Hi Eddie this is the fuel gauge not much to go by
 

Attachments

Eddy McClements

Supporter
Looks like a Smiths "GT40 style" gauge, and would require a 20-220 ohms (or thereabouts) sender:-

Though it might be the voltage regulator which has failed, and these are often wired to provide the necessary 10V feed for fuel gauge and oil temp / water temp gauges (all three of these require 10V to read correctly).
 
Looks like a Smiths "GT40 style" gauge, and would require a 20-220 ohms (or thereabouts) sender:-

Though it might be the voltage regulator which has failed, and these are often wired to provide the necessary 10V feed for fuel gauge and oil temp / water temp gauges (all three of these require 10V to read correctly).
Thanks Eddy
 
Top