Group Purchase of GT40 Drawings for Public Use

Ron Earp

Administrator
Staff member
Ironically, when I was at VIR last week Val and I were discussing the rear sway bar. He walked into his office and pulled out his copy of the original design drawings. Its a book, kinda legal size, obviously old. It has all the schematics for everything (except the rear sway bar). I think he has it from working on originals in the past. He didn't think anything of it, thought it was funny how excited I was :)
I think I have a copy of those! Not the engineering drawings that are blue prints that you'd build something, but a large collection of drawings of the various parts. You couldn't build anything from them, but they are neat to look at. I'll have to see if I can find them. Someone from the forum sent them to me many years ago and now I remember them. Photocopies, bound in a three ring binder.

BTW - I was informed that the fellow that was selling the CDs with drawings last year, "Paul Drawings", may not have legally possessed what he was selling. From my extremely limited understanding he illegally obtained the drawings from a third party, made copies, and sold them. I have since reviewed his profile on this forum and found he did send approximately 40 PM's in his brief stay on GT40s.com but he cleaned out his mailbox, changed his email to [email protected], changed all contact info, and flew the coup. Now, before anyone gets riled up Icannot read his PMs or login as him, I could just see his message statistics. Just passing along info as I learn it and quite naturally, take the info with a grain of salt.
 
Nice...a serpent even in this paradise ;).

Do we still have a possible source for a set of these items that would be willing to sell to us as a group? I've lost track of things, honestly.
 

Ron Earp

Administrator
Staff member
Do we still have a possible source for a set of these items that would be willing to sell to us as a group? I've lost track of things, honestly.
Not of which I am aware. If someone were able to obtain drawings with "clear title" I'll be happy to host them here. CAD, images, etc. However, I don't want anything to do with stolen property.
 

Mark Charlton

Bronze Supporter
My point here, which I am not doing a very good job of putting across, is that there is a great deal more to making these parts than just having a drawing of them... That's the difference- the interpretation and execution of the instructions. The drawings are the instructions- not the performance.
Actually Jim, I think you did a superb job of communicating the point and I agree completely.

Mark
 
Re: Original Chassis Drawings

Interesting that Paul the criminal was willing to meet with one of our highly regarded forum members face to face.
Why would he risk doing this ??


Yes it is interesting.
It also appears that the £2500 was no doubt established after a number of people on this forum who contacted Paul and wanted exclusivity of the CD files.
I met the chap over some beers and his lap-top for my purchase and he was a decent fellow and he explained all of this to me.
So Ron, perhaps some of your 99.99% are less pietous than you care to believe.
 
From the US Copyright Office. Here is what the law says about copyrights. (This includes drawings and publishing or copying other people's works.)

What is copyright?
Copyright is a form of protection grounded in the U.S. Constitution and granted by law for original works of authorship fixed in a tangible medium of expression. Copyright covers both published and unpublished works.

What does copyright protect?
Copyright, a form of intellectual property law, protects original works of authorship including literary, dramatic, musical, and artistic works, such as poetry, novels, movies, songs, computer software, and architecture. Copyright does not protect facts, ideas, systems, or methods of operation, although it may protect the way these things are expressed. See Circular 1, Copyright Basics, section "What Works Are Protected."

How is a copyright different from a patent or a trademark?
Copyright protects original works of authorship, while a patent protects inventions or discoveries. Ideas and discoveries are not protected by the copyright law, although the way in which they are expressed may be. A trademark protects words, phrases, symbols, or designs identifying the source of the goods or services of one party and distinguishing them from those of others.

When is my work protected?
Your work is under copyright protection the moment it is created and fixed in a tangible form that it is perceptible either directly or with the aid of a machine or device.

Do I have to register with your office to be protected?
No. In general, registration is voluntary. Copyright exists from the moment the work is created. You will have to register, however, if you wish to bring a lawsuit for infringement of a U.S. work. See Circular 1, Copyright Basics, section “Copyright Registration.”

How much of someone else's work can I use without getting permission?
Under the fair use doctrine of the U.S. copyright statute, it is permissible to use limited portions of a work including quotes, for purposes such as commentary, criticism, news reporting, and scholarly reports. There are no legal rules permitting the use of a specific number of words, a certain number of musical notes, or percentage of a work. Whether a particular use qualifies as fair use depends on all the circumstances.

Could I be sued for using somebody else's work? How about quotes or samples?
If you use a copyrighted work without authorization, the owner may be entitled to bring an infringement action against you. There are circumstances under the fair use doctrine where a quote or a sample may be used without permission. However, in cases of doubt, the Copyright Office recommends that permission be obtained.

How long does a copyright last?
The term of copyright for a particular work depends on several factors, including whether it has been published, and, if so, the date of first publication. As a general rule, for works created after January 1, 1978, copyright protection lasts for the life of the author plus an additional 70 years. For an anonymous work, a pseudonymous work, or a work made for hire, the copyright endures for a term of 95 years from the year of its first publication or a term of 120 years from the year of its creation, whichever expires first. For works first published prior to 1978, the term will vary depending on several factors. To determine the length of copyright protection for a particular work, consult chapter 3 of the Copyright Act (title 17 of the United States Code).

Since the designs are at least 40 years old this will apply.

The old system of computing the duration of protection was carried over into the 1976 statute with one major change: the length of the second term is increased to 67 years.² Thus, the maximum total term of copyright protection for works already protected by federal statute is increased from 56 years (a first term of 28 years plus a renewal term of 28 years) to 95 years (a first term of 28 years plus a renewal term of 67 years).
The specific situation for works copyrighted before 1978 depends on whether the copyright had already been renewed or was still in its first term on December 31, 1977.

Might have to wait another 55 years. Be Careful.
 

New Member
Since this forum is open to the public.
And does not have a mandatory fee to participate.
The forum does not use the information posted here for profit.
But to clarify information on how, where, when, and why things were done, pertaining to the subject.
How any individual use's said information, I think would be On Them.
The forum I think would be considered as a Public Library so to speak !
Is there some logic to this thought ?
or am I barking up the wrong tree ?
Just wondering ?

Curtis
 
Count me in for a donation of $100. If anything can be sorted out. I would possibly donate more depending on the amount of drawings and what is covered. Let me know if I can help.
 
My brother compared the parts number info in the list from the guy from England (There is an excell file in an earlier posting) to the hundreds of ones he has. There are only a few that are common. Here is what he sent me the other day. You may find his comments interesting if you wish to continue to pursue the ones in England.

I'm doing this e-mail wireless from my laptop, so I can't access the files on my tower computer. I have completed the project of matching the list of drawings you sent me in the Excel file with the parts manual I have for the GT-40 GT-108. I could only match 31 of the drawing files on the list to specific parts illustrated in my parts manual. I can understand that some of my parts were complete assemblies with a single part number, while the assemblies are made up of several to many pieces that had to be designed separately one by one. Also, drawing files seem to cover later versions of the GT-40 with redesigned parts substituted for those originally used on the first 13 GT-40's.

You have the cover page with the letters pointing to various locations on the cutaway drawing of the complete car. Each of those letters represents a Plate Letter with a list of parts in an exploded view of them. The following matches were found between the list of drawings vs. the parts manual illustrations.

Plate A GT40P/1/2018 Support Member RR Hoop
Plate B GT40P/1/2084 Bracket - Engine Mounting Upper RH
Plate P GT40P/2/3012 Foot Rest
Plate P GT40P/2/3223 Abutment Bracket Throttle Cable (Pedal End)
Plate J GT40P/1/2510 Bolt - Engine Mount - Rear - Lower
Plate A SGT40P/1/2152 Assy Panel Access - Dash Upper RH
Plate A SGT40P/1/2153 Panel Access - Dash Upper LH
Plate Q GT40P/11/16504 Fixed Length Outer Steering Column
Plate P GT40P/2/3016 Bell Crank - Accelerator Linkage
Plate Q GT40P/11/6502 Fixed Length Inner Steering Column
Plate P GT40P/2/3007 Mod's Required to Pedal Bracket
Plate P GT40P/2/3039 Brake Pedal
Plate P GT40P/2/3011 Accelerator Pedal
Plate P GT40P/2/3017 Clutch Pedal
Plate N GT40P/7/5289 Rod Assembly - Front - Gear Shift Lever - ZF Transmission
Plate N GT40P/7/5298 Rear Rod Assembly - Gear Shift - ZF Transmission
Plate S GT40P/4/4035 Bearing Housing - Front Upper Ballstud
Plate B GT40P/1/2562 Engine Mounting LH
Plate B GT40P/1/2563 Engine Mounting RH
Plate Q GT40P/11/6511 Shaft - Steering Rack to Column
Plate N GT40P/7/5304 Cover Plate Gear Shift
Plate N GT40P/7/5334 Latch Reverse Lock
Plate N GT40P/7/5392 Special Bolt Gear Shift
Plate T GT40P/5/4515 Link - Rear Suspension Upper
Plate N GT40P/7/5287 Pin - Gear Shift Lever Pivot - ZF Transmission
Plate N GT40P/7/5278 Knob - Gear Selector Lever
Plate N GT40P/7/5302 Flanged Coller - Gear Shift
Plate N GT40P/7/5375 Link - Reverse Lock Latch
Plate W GT40P/1/2596-7 Assy - Wheel Arch Closing Panel - LH & RH
Plate G GT40P/10/6302 Mounting Bracket - Three Way Tap
Plate S GT40P/4/4042 Assy Wishbone Front Upper

That's the list of matches. Have fun with this.
 

Professor Plumpe

School for Scandal
Hi Steven - short answer is: there aren't any.

However, since you have published your email address, there may be someone on this forum, with access to a full set of plans, looking to sell.

Three important considerations spring to mind: 1. Caveat Emptor. 2. If such a set were available, from reading through this thread, it might command a 6 figure premium. 3. For a 6 figure sum, you can also buy an authentic nut & bolt recreation of the original complete with FIA Historic Passport.

Good luck with your search....
 
From the US Copyright Office. Here is what the law says about copyrights. (This includes drawings and publishing or copying other people's works.)

What is copyright?
Copyright is a form of protection grounded in the U.S. Constitution and granted by law for original works of authorship fixed in a tangible medium of expression. Copyright covers both published and unpublished works.

What does copyright protect?
Copyright, a form of intellectual property law, protects original works of authorship including literary, dramatic, musical, and artistic works, such as poetry, novels, movies, songs, computer software, and architecture. Copyright does not protect facts, ideas, systems, or methods of operation, although it may protect the way these things are expressed. See Circular 1, Copyright Basics, section "What Works Are Protected."

How is a copyright different from a patent or a trademark?
Copyright protects original works of authorship, while a patent protects inventions or discoveries. Ideas and discoveries are not protected by the copyright law, although the way in which they are expressed may be. A trademark protects words, phrases, symbols, or designs identifying the source of the goods or services of one party and distinguishing them from those of others.

When is my work protected?
Your work is under copyright protection the moment it is created and fixed in a tangible form that it is perceptible either directly or with the aid of a machine or device.

Do I have to register with your office to be protected?
No. In general, registration is voluntary. Copyright exists from the moment the work is created. You will have to register, however, if you wish to bring a lawsuit for infringement of a U.S. work. See Circular 1, Copyright Basics, section “Copyright Registration.”

How much of someone else's work can I use without getting permission?
Under the fair use doctrine of the U.S. copyright statute, it is permissible to use limited portions of a work including quotes, for purposes such as commentary, criticism, news reporting, and scholarly reports. There are no legal rules permitting the use of a specific number of words, a certain number of musical notes, or percentage of a work. Whether a particular use qualifies as fair use depends on all the circumstances.

Could I be sued for using somebody else's work? How about quotes or samples?
If you use a copyrighted work without authorization, the owner may be entitled to bring an infringement action against you. There are circumstances under the fair use doctrine where a quote or a sample may be used without permission. However, in cases of doubt, the Copyright Office recommends that permission be obtained.

How long does a copyright last?
The term of copyright for a particular work depends on several factors, including whether it has been published, and, if so, the date of first publication. As a general rule, for works created after January 1, 1978, copyright protection lasts for the life of the author plus an additional 70 years. For an anonymous work, a pseudonymous work, or a work made for hire, the copyright endures for a term of 95 years from the year of its first publication or a term of 120 years from the year of its creation, whichever expires first. For works first published prior to 1978, the term will vary depending on several factors. To determine the length of copyright protection for a particular work, consult chapter 3 of the Copyright Act (title 17 of the United States Code).

Since the designs are at least 40 years old this will apply.

The old system of computing the duration of protection was carried over into the 1976 statute with one major change: the length of the second term is increased to 67 years.² Thus, the maximum total term of copyright protection for works already protected by federal statute is increased from 56 years (a first term of 28 years plus a renewal term of 28 years) to 95 years (a first term of 28 years plus a renewal term of 67 years).
The specific situation for works copyrighted before 1978 depends on whether the copyright had already been renewed or was still in its first term on December 31, 1977.

Might have to wait another 55 years. Be Careful.
I am no expert but the copyright is only relevent in the country of origin unless a worldwide cover is intended. The original design were FAV England and FoMoCo US. I am thinking the JWAE drawings would be UK and also involve FoMoCo US. I was told there were around 2600 drawing for the Ford GT40. James Allington Techinical Illustrations were used in the GT40 parts manual.
Regards Allan
 
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