Mason’s Build: Superlite SLC

Would adding lead diving weights, or steel plates, to the front help with the weight balance? or is the difference just too much for that to be practical?
 
Would adding lead diving weights, or steel plates, to the front help with the weight balance? or is the difference just too much for that to be practical?
Round numbers, but you get the idea - figure a 3000lb SLC with a 40/60 split gives 1200/1800 front to rear. To make that 50/50 you’d have to add 600 lbs to the front end.
 
Scott, concerning the modulation of the emergency parking brake, the motors themselves are very slow in their movement, so their ability to react to dynamic events to maintain traction would be questionable. But, preventing rear wheel lock up at higher speeds, sounds like a worthwhile feature!
 
There is nothing wrong with the weight balance of these cars and they are not skittish. except of course until you go pulling on the handbrake too hard while underway (can you say "drifting" or Ken Block?). This is what Scott is trying to address, modulation of an electronically activated rear parking brake if used as an emergency stopping device.

They are not front engined so yes, one will need to be aware that too much rear brake bias can get you caught out while braking into a corner near the limit. I would suggest anyone not familiar with operating dynamics of a mid-engine car take it to a skid pad or other wide pavement area for at the limit handling sessions.
 

Neil

Supporter
Would adding lead diving weights, or steel plates, to the front help with the weight balance? or is the difference just too much for that to be practical?
It would be a step backwards. The basic idea of a 40/60 (F/R) weight distribution is to provide plenty of weight on the rear wheels under acceleration to gain as much traction as possible. Conversely, under braking, the car's weight transfers to the front wheels due to the center of mass being above ground level and this provides around 50/50 momentary weight distribution so that the tires all provide as much stopping power as they are each capable of.

A good suspension design can cope with a 40/60 weight distribution. Tires can also make a big difference in how a car handles, particularly a mid-engine. In general, bias ply tires have a more gentle break-away characteristic but lower ultimate grip while radial ply tires are the opposite. Years ago Road & Track tested a fast mid-engine car- I can't remember which- and they hated its handling but, by changing tires it was transformed.
 
Does anyone know how to unlock this ecu connector so I can insert terminals? I believe the blue cap needs to be raised but I’m not sure how to get it open. This will connect to my Delta 880 ECU.

The connector is an Aptiv Apex 2.8 14 way connector.

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Turns out I just needed to pull the small rectangle near the latch with some needle nose pliers. Support at Specialties Control Systems has been fantastic. Everyday I send them questions about the Delta ECU and they are quick to respond.

What do you all recommend for electrical connectors? I looked into using the Aptiv connectors as seen in the post above but a fully dressed connection above is $40-50 for all the terminals, connector housing and seals. Also the delphi connector tools are another $400-$500.
 
I've never really found any aftermarket connector I was really happy with, at least not a price I was willing to pay. I tend to hit the junkyard and find OEM connectors that use the delphi style pins so that I de-pin them and put in new pins from cheap amazon weatherpack connectors.

I have been eyeing these, but haven't pulled the trigger yet:


For crimpers, I've done two cars with this $30 pair.


If you want to get really crazy, follow this guy's path:

 

Jasper

Supporter
Mason, if you want to learn alot about wiring to motorsport standards, go to HP Academy website. They even offering (currently) a 5dollar training on Motorsport wiring essentials at the moment to get a taste of what they do.
I followed all their courses, and it was a real revelation for me.
 
Alan, thanks for the connector and tool recommendations those Glark DT-Style connectors are well reviewed considering their price.

Jasper, regardless of connector style the HP Academy course sounds like a great kickstart to my wiring adventures.

I have the ECU wired up and the engine running and I'm currently tracking down a misfire that is causing a low idle condition.
 

Jasper

Supporter
Mason, the HPA stuff is brilliant.. the details they show, the materials out there you didn't even know existed etc.
Since using them, i'm doing all my automotive wiring on a different level.

I love the DR25 sheething material to protect the wiring.. much better then braiding or the horrible plastic tubing.
I love the /32 Tefzel wiring. Much thinner insulation, resulting in much smaller wiring looms with increased chemical and mechanical resistance.
I love the Deutsch DT/DTM connectors, and I use them for anything. Lights to dashboard etc. Fairly affordable, small form factor for anything from 1 to 12-position connectors.

I'm not going overboard with super expensive circular connectors (yet), and 50-dollar shrink boots etc..
But you can pick-and-choose, and end up with a significantly more robust wiring solution than anything available on the market. You just have to put in the hours :) ... Isn't that always the trade off haha.
 
Jasper, the HP Academy class is excellent, I've completed half of the wiring fundamentals class and it has been great. Really impressed with all the tips on running proper engine and chassis grounds. Where have you sourced your Raychem DR25 and Tefzel wiring? They make it sound cost prohibitive in the class material.

Running heater lines, why not just tap into the 1.5" coolant pipes running to the radiator as seen on Sean's RCR GT-40 build? Most SLC builders tend to run two #10 heater lines all the way back to the engine, is this really necessary?

AC Heater lines tapped into the coolant pipes on an RCR 40
 

Joel K

Supporter
Jasper, the HP Academy class is excellent, I've completed half of the wiring fundamentals class and it has been great. Really impressed with all the tips on running proper engine and chassis grounds. Where have you sourced your Raychem DR25 and Tefzel wiring? They make it sound cost prohibitive in the class material.

Running heater lines, why not just tap into the 1.5" coolant pipes running to the radiator as seen on Sean's RCR GT-40 build? Most SLC builders tend to run two #10 heater lines all the way back to the engine, is this really necessary?

AC Heater lines tapped into the coolant pipes on an RCR 40
That’s pretty slick, Kurtiss did this as well. Check out the discussion starting on post #105. Specifically, using a wye fitting instead of a tee fitting may provide better flow.

I thought about doing this and agree it would simplify things. In the end I figure the standard way uses about 15 to 20 feet or so of hose and It is a proven approach that works.
 
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I have no practical experience from trying to hookup a heater core that way, but a few fluid flow classes from college lead me to believe that you will get very little circulation through the core by tapping the 1.5” lines, regardless of what angle you use. The issue is that the 1.5” line dumps into the open area at the top of the radiator, and therefore has no back pressure, and the heater core is a pressured loop. If you need your heater to provide any significant warmth, you will either need a small electric booster pump at the first tap, or let the water pump drive the flow from the block.

 

Brian Kissel

Lifetime Supporter
At one time the small Bosch intercooler pump was a popular thing. Somewhere I bought one and the harness. I believe I bought it off EBay. I just looked, and there a several versions available.

Regards Brian
 
IIRC the LS motors require some amount of fluid flow between the out/in ports for the heater core (and is why everyone runs the Chevs of the 40s valve) in order for the thermostat to function correctly. I did a deep dive into this while I was working on my system -


There’s a link on my blog to another site (pirates4x4 or something like that) which has a very in depth discussion pertinent to LS based motors.
 

Jasper

Supporter
Jasper, the HP Academy class is excellent, I've completed half of the wiring fundamentals class and it has been great. Really impressed with all the tips on running proper engine and chassis grounds. Where have you sourced your Raychem DR25 and Tefzel wiring? They make it sound cost prohibitive in the class material.

Running heater lines, why not just tap into the 1.5" coolant pipes running to the radiator as seen on Sean's RCR GT-40 build? Most SLC builders tend to run two #10 heater lines all the way back to the engine, is this really necessary?

AC Heater lines tapped into the coolant pipes on an RCR 40
I don't know where you are, but im in South Africa. I have to import all that stuff from the US.. still do it :)
DR25 is not that expensive, nor is the tefzel wiring.. or the SCL dual wall lined stuff. The circular connectors are STUPID expensive.. so i'm not touching that.
A couple of websites I use to buy material freqently is Mouser, Prowireusa, Ballingermotorsport, milspecwiring.com. I'm sure there are more sources, but its not as expensive as you'd think.

Also, i've had horrible electrical reliability ruin the experience of cars before. And it just gets to you, you never enjoy it as much as you could have. The time and effort is bigger then the money you have to put into it, but in my mind well worth it in the end. Flawless endless reliabilty is a great thing!
 

Jasper

Supporter
IIRC the LS motors require some amount of fluid flow between the out/in ports for the heater core (and is why everyone runs the Chevs of the 40s valve) in order for the thermostat to function correctly. I did a deep dive into this while I was working on my system -


There’s a link on my blog to another site (pirates4x4 or something like that) which has a very in depth discussion pertinent to LS based motors.
I think you could tap the 1.5" line in the front just fine. The think that makes it flow through your heater core is the pressure in the line. The relationship between main line diameter and your take-off is irrelivant, it will not be flow prohibitive.

However, do take note of Cam's warning. DONT plug the heater out/in ports on any LS motor. You need to install a bypass 'u-bend' on them, to always keep some circulation going there. If you do that, you'll be fine to put a tapping point in the front i'm sure.
 
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