McLaren replica build base on a Manta

Mike,

I want to put a Cleveland into a mid year Corvette, just to take to shows and piss off the Bowtie guys!
An a previous owner of many Ford products, including an original GT500KR, I am also appalled that so many people put Chevy 350's into everything, including old 30's and 40's Ford Hot Rods. I know their reasoning, Chevy's are cheap. But a 351 Windsor would be better suited in a vintage Ford vehicle.
I also, would like to piss off the bowtie crowd, by putting a Ford 427 SOHC into a 1963 split window Corvette !
:devilish:
 
Why would you want a car that was a mistake. Even gmc knew they screwed up, thats why they only made the split window for one year. Of course the chevophiles thought it was limited edition and made it a collectors item. Then gmc produced a whole bunch of crap cars and the people still bought them. But the attitude whats good for general motors is good for the country came crashing down.
Now if you really want to make them mad put a 347 in one of the new camaros.
 
I once tried to buy a $50.00 raffle ticket for a Corvette, the seller ( a chev nut ) wondered why I wanted a ticket & asked what I would do if I won it!, Told him I would toss the chebbie & put a 351 in it........ he wouldnt sell me the ticket:):):)
 

Randy V

Admin
Lifetime Supporter
Of course the chevophiles thought it was limited edition and made it a collectors item.
I could post a bunch of pictures of Edsels and 74-78 Mustangs - but that would be dragging this fine thread even further off topic...

Let's get back to the great Manta being assembled here.. :thumbsup:
 

Terry Oxandale

Skinny Man
Supporter
Moderators are our friends :)

Finished routing of oil/fuel hoses. I ran -12 hose from the tank to the dual filter which effectively splits the flow (parallel paths) through two filters and two coolers utilizing -10 hose and fittings. Then it all comes back together into a T (blue inverted AN fitting behind the foreground hoses) which enlarges back into a -12 hose returning the oil to the engine bearings:







 
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Terry Oxandale

Skinny Man
Supporter
Re: Coolant manifold

Work has slowed down a bit, and I've been set back some due to the peculiarities of welding stainless, but on my third try, I finally got the warping and shrinkage down to a very manageable level (I had to finally get some advice from a guy that welds countertops for hospitals).

So I cut out the inlet/outlet plates for the LS2 I’m using out of 3/8” SS plate (A Sawzall, drill-press, and rotary file are wonderful tools), and then cut and welded the 1 ¼” tubing to the plates. I still need to fabricate the lower outlet manifold, but I ran out of material as I was deeply embedded in a long learning curve. So now I wait for to extra tubing to arrive.







Just for grins, I’m going to try this with aluminum tubing and plates just to see which one is easier to weld (guessing on the SS, but it warps and shrinks so much worse than anything I’ve ever welding in aluminum).
 
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Ox, I think the aluminum would not only be easier to weld, but would be affected less than the aluminum block/stainless adapters. Good plan!
 
Nice work Terry. I like the illustrations too. The fancy arrows and drawings. What rod are you using on the stainless and what type of stainless tube are you welding,
Dave
 

Terry Oxandale

Skinny Man
Supporter
The OEM pump was tried, and I did modify the framing to allow it as an option should all of this fail to work out. The advantage of this design is that it reduces all the commotion of bends between the pump and the longitudinal tubes running to the radiator. I was also looking to reduce the tensioners and pulleys since an alternator is the only device I plan to run off the belt. Tubing is brown-bag 304.
My only real concern was the expansion coeficient difference, but it is less than mild steel, and motors have run decades with alum/iron mixing/matching without issues.
 
Hi Terry

I was looking at your suspension pics. Could you tell me where you got the parts to make the a arms? Looks as though they can be assembled with nothing more than a wrench. I need to make some front lower a arms for a C5 corvette upright. Maybe upper ones too. Thanks!

Bill
 

Randy V

Admin
Lifetime Supporter
Hi Terry

I was looking at your suspension pics. Could you tell me where you got the parts to make the a arms? Looks as though they can be assembled with nothing more than a wrench. I need to make some front lower a arms for a C5 corvette upright. Maybe upper ones too. Thanks!

Bill
Bill - Took a look back and found that Terry fabricated the parts himself - here:
http://www.gt40s.com/forum/can-am-racers-917s-etc/28262-mclaren-replica-build-base-manta.html#post259057
 
Hello Terry,

Was looking at your steering rack and thought it might fit into my design. Any chance you could give me some of the overall dimensions? Largest diameter, and total rack width without any extentions? Also, where did you buy the rack from? Thanks for your time.

Bill
 

Terry Oxandale

Skinny Man
Supporter
I'll PM you on the details, but for benefit of the string:

I am replacing the center-steer rack (it works fine in the current configuration, but I'm looking for the best of every world here!) with a Maval custom rack (thanks for that lead Ron!) using a side mounted pinion gear. Again, the 911 rack worked out very well, but I need a little more room under the rack to mount the radiator bypass assembly, and the side-pinion rack will allow this more easily.
 

Terry Oxandale

Skinny Man
Supporter
Who would have thought a seemingly simple project of coolant plumbing would take three weeks to fabricate. After four scraped coolant manifolds of various materials, designs, and assembly steps, two 125 foot gas cylinders, and an untold number of mandrel bent tubes of various sizes, I finally finished the final product, set the pump in what seems to be the best practical location, got the by-pass system figured out, and am ready to go on the rest (rear) of the car.

Below is the coolant manifold. The goal was to eliminate the OEM water pump (due to spacing limitations, and the outlet/inlet configuration (plus the wish list was to push as much weight as far forward as was possible). I was concerned that unless I had a symmetrical manifold, I risked un-even water flow between the left and right banks of the block. The OEM pump outlet was into the block, and inlet was out from the heads, but I wanted a reverse flow to have the cooler water hit the heads first. Since this top portion will basically be nearly the highest point in the cooling system, I’m installing a threaded bung to put a vent tube out the top of the upper Tee.









The by-pass component was a hybrid of the Mustang Cobra SVT bypass shown below, and the cap from a Contour SVT (not shown). The difference was the Cobra “RAD” port was cocked at a 90º angle, while the Contour cap exited almost straight out (along the long axis), which allowed me to lay the by-pass assembly over on its side. In the lower photo, the bypass port is on the right side of the assembly and will be tied to the tube immediately above that port. Thanks goes to Mike Trusty for the SVT suggestion.







Finally, the plumbing from the manifold, through the by-pass assembly, to the radiator, to the pump, and back to the engine is below. Yes, it is rather circuitous, but it was the only practical solution. I didn’t have room in the engine bay. I could have crammed it up front with the by-pass assembly, but my goal was to have the pumps output go as directly to the block as is possible. Which means the pump had to be located ahead of the passenger side fuel tank, and the plumbing reside under the knee support hump.









Ox
 
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