Joel’s SL-C Build Thread

Joel K

Supporter
Time for the next update. This posts focuses on mounting the condenser.

I wanted to mount the condenser in a way to integrate it with the custom radiator mount brackets and grommet assembly.

Some of the goals in mind were:
1)provide some level of vibration isolation to the condenser.
2)Easily seal off the condenser so virtually all air flows through the condenser and then through the radiator.
3)Position the condenser in order to route both the #6 & #8 U-Bend-Em lines through one of the radiator holes.

Here is a video on mounting the radiator and installing the condenser...

Here is the initial bracket design made from 1” tall and 1/16” thick aluminum angles...
6303C631-33B6-4841-AD64-0DBCA64F0658.jpeg


It mounts nicely to the radiator mount bolts and grommets. The bottom of the bracket will seal to the floor with some very thin rubber or weather stripping....
27066AC4-69B3-452C-BBDF-49CF00B303C1.jpeg


Here is a pic of the finished bracket components. The left angle needed to be modified to provide access to the hole in the radiator. The top and bottom angles needed to be trimmed so they would not cover up the top and bottom cooling rows of the condenser...
3A3C723F-953D-4449-81D3-614FD10AEEDE.jpeg


With the condenser installed you can see it will be easy to seal the top of the bracket to the radiator with some aluminum tape and seal it to the body with some weather stripping....
B76AC49C-B933-4B98-B42A-CD5E8603683E.jpeg


Because of having to move the radiator forward 3/4” it’s all a tight fit. The condenser just clears the cross bar for the splitter and the screws to assemble the condenser bracket just clears the radiator. The good news is the condenser sits a good 3/4” from the face of the radiator core which I think is what is recommended....
BD20E2F0-DFDA-43B4-94BA-0CE8F5270823.jpeg


Here is the condenser and mounting bracket secured to the radiator mounts. I may lower the bracket a smidge and also weld up the corners before final assembly of the front compartment....
BAE04BFB-6BD0-4B7E-A1DE-EC3F6801BFC3.jpeg


Next up are the cooling tubes....
 
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Beautiful Joel. I just went the easy way, yours definitely elegant and functional. Great work, Good luck bending the lines, Hope you do better than what I did, Glad to be done with that part for sure.
 

Joel K

Supporter
Time for the next update. This post focuses on the initial fabrication of the cooling tubes.

In an earlier post I mocked up the cooling tubes out of PVC to get a sense for the layout and design.
Here is a video on the process...

I decided to follow in a number of other builders footsteps and fabricate up solid stainless steel cooling tubes. The perceived advantage is they are less likely to leak since solid tubes have fewer hose couplers. The compromise being that this approach requires the work necessary to cut and fit the piping and may be more difficult to repair in the future.

Like many other aspects of building a car there are always trade offs. To address the possibility of repairing the tubes in the future, I wanted to design in the potential to remove them from the chassis without removing the body. The approach I came up with is to secure the tube mounts from the bottom of the chassis. So if worst comes to worse, I can at least detach the tubes from the chassis without removing or lifting the body.

I tried to design them so they can disassemble in a way that they can be removed out the back of the car. Not sure I’ll achieve the goal once the car is assembled, but we will see.

The pic below shows the dual p-clamp assembly with standoff plates. The p-clamps will connect to the standoff plates from the top and the plates will be secured to the chassis from below. I may use the dual p-clamp setup shown to prevent the clamps from flexing on one side and eventually weaken and break. The standoff plates are 3/8” thick aluminum which combined with the p-clamps provides 1/2” clearance for pipe insulation...
F9C0A987-2716-4589-8EA2-498F46888FC3.jpeg


The standoff plates for the front cooling tubes came in handy to accurately place the cooling tubes at the correct height. The p-clamps with the standoffs were placed so that the bottom of the p-clamp are slightly(approx 1/8”) above the bottom of the chassis. This leaves enough room for the cooling tubes to clear the lower control arms at full droop and not hang below the chassis...
95238F91-487A-4A1E-A246-B74C98EE2CFA.jpeg


In order to fit the steel tube sections in line I trimmed and fit a section of PVC and then cute the steel tubes at the same length with a pipe cutter...
D3A29B1C-EE90-43B5-831C-F51EBB65CD63.jpeg


The first section is looking good with a tight fit of the pipes. You can see the front standoffs place the front tubes 1/2” off the chassis leaving room for chassis sound and heat shielding and also tube insulation.
D5E5795F-479F-4C30-BDB6-9BC109B33A9D.jpeg


One thing that was not obvious to me until I started fabricating the tubes is that if using 45 degree elbows to connect the side and the front tubes, the tubes get very close and/or can touch the front chassis corner. I was concerned the pipes would tap against the corner of the chassis as well as as leave no room for tube insulation in that area so decided to use the combination of the 90 and 45 degree elbow setup.

The combination of using the 45 and 90 degree elbows provide plenty of clearance to the front chassis corner. It also allows for the side tubes to be placed 1/2” higher than the front tubes without having to angle the front tubes down and angled into the chassis.

Now on to the driver rear cooling tube fitment. These 45 degree elbows are challenging and leave little to no room for error. Measure 10 times and cut once!
39B6FE9B-D5D4-4B37-92D7-B18CE7DA62C0.jpeg



Pic of the driver rear cooling tube fitted and in place...
FDD4D7B9-03EC-4822-B568-151201618CF3.jpeg


Pic of the driver front cooling tube. Using 45 degree elbows where possible to reduce head pressure vs. 90 degree elbows...
F29B91FE-F045-46C1-B534-C0C74F99ECFE.jpeg


Pic of the passenger rear cooling tube. Had to be cut precisely to snake around the dry sump tank...
7A5F5E1B-2338-4665-BEA3-42B05118244B.jpeg


Pic of the passenger front cooling tube. More 45 degree elbows...
ECC0D2E8-8619-4A40-9474-7B5A71120C7C.jpeg


After thinking about the setup a bit, I modified the front tubes and added pipe sections with a bead so I’ll join them together vs. having a single welded structure. This Makes it possible to remove the front silicone couplers by the radiator without having to slice them up and replace them with new ones. It also adds a bit of forgiveness to get the pipes to align and sit flat and tight against the chassis...
245A2212-A860-4376-9302-86399ABEA248.jpeg


At this point I’ll move on to the AC lines and will have the welder come to the house to tack weld up the cooling tubes. Also, since the engine is not in. Final fabrication of the rear tubes will happen when the engine gets installed.
 
Last edited:
Time for the next update. This post focuses on the initial fabrication of the cooling tubes.

In an earlier post I mocked up the cooling tubes out of PVC to get a sense for the layout and design.
Here is a video on the process...

I decided to follow in a number of other builders footsteps and fabricate up solid stainless steel cooling tubes. The perceived advantage is they are less likely to leak since solid tubes have fewer hose couplers. The compromise being that this approach requires the work necessary to cut and fit the piping and may be more difficult to repair in the future.

Like many other aspects of building a car there are always trade offs. To address the possibility of repairing the tubes in the future, I wanted to design in the potential to remove them from the chassis without removing the body. The approach I came up with is to secure the tube mounts from the bottom of the chassis. So if worst comes to worse, I can at least detach the tubes from the chassis without removing or lifting the body.

I tried to design them so they can disassemble in a way that they can be removed out the back of the car. Not sure I’ll achieve the goal once the car is assembled, but we will see.

The pic below shows the dual p-clamp assembly with standoff plates. The p-clamps will connect to the standoff plates from the top and the plates will be secured to the chassis from below. I may use the dual p-clamp setup shown to prevent the clamps from flexing on one side and eventually weaken and break. The standoff plates are 3/8” thick aluminum which combined with the p-clamps provides 1/2” clearance for pipe insulation...
View attachment 108609

The standoff plates for the front cooling tubes came in handy to accurately place the cooling tubes at the correct height. The p-clamps with the standoffs were placed so that the bottom of the p-clamp are slightly(approx 1/8”) above the bottom of the chassis. This leaves enough room for the cooling tubes to clear the lower control arms at full droop and not hang below the chassis...
View attachment 108610

In order to fit the steel tube sections in line I trimmed and fit a section of PVC and then cute the steel tubes at the same length with a pipe cutter...
View attachment 108611

The first section is looking good with a tight fit of the pipes. You can see the front standoffs place the front tubes 1/2” off the chassis leaving room for chassis sound and heat shielding and also tube insulation.
View attachment 108612

One thing that was not obvious to me until I started fabricating the tubes is that if using 45 degree elbows to connect the side and the front tubes, the tubes get very close and/or can touch the front chassis corner. I was concerned the pipes would tap against the corner of the chassis as well as as leave no room for tube insulation in that area so decided to use the combination of the 90 and 45 degree elbow setup.

The combination of using the 45 and 90 degree elbows provide plenty of clearance to the front chassis corner. It also allows for the side tubes to be placed 1/2” higher than the front tubes without having to angle the front tubes down and angled into the chassis.

Now on to the driver rear cooling tube fitment. These 45 degree elbows are challenging and leave little to no room for error. Measure 10 times and cut once!
View attachment 108613


Pic of the driver rear cooling tube fitted and in place...
View attachment 108614

Pic of the driver front cooling tube. Using 45 degree elbows where possible to reduce head pressure vs. 90 degree elbows...
View attachment 108615

Pic of the passenger rear cooling tube. Had to be cut precisely to snake around the dry sump tank...
View attachment 108616

Pic of the passenger front cooling tube. More 45 degree elbows...
View attachment 108617

After thinking about the setup a bit, I modified the front tubes and added pipe sections with a bead so I’ll join them together vs. having a single welded structure. This Makes it possible to remove the front silicone couplers by the radiator without having to slice them up and replace them with new ones. It also adds a bit of forgiveness to get the pipes to align and sit flat and tight against the chassis...
View attachment 108618

At this point I’ll move on to the AC lines and will have the welder come to the house to tack weld up the cooling tubes. Also, since the engine is not in. Final fabrication of the rear tubes will happen when the engine gets installed.
Are you going to wrap/insulate the pipes?
 
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