possibly the sickest engine/tran package for an SLC ??

First post.

How about the V12 from a Toyota Century? Makes 290 HP stock rumoured to actually make about 350 HP. Has been tuned to 500 HP in street tune and over 700 for a couple of drift cars. Probably too long for an SLC but could be interesting and different. And if enough money is thrown at the project could work.
 
Dan,

I don't think it will fit. I have a 1UZ V8 and it's tight. I have 1/2" between the dry sump drive and the firewall. Without the dry sump the engine could go 1.5" forward. That would not be enough to fit the extra length. Moving the transaxle back farther is not an option.
 
Dan,

I don't think it will fit. I have a 1UZ V8 and it's tight. I have 1/2" between the dry sump drive and the firewall. Without the dry sump the engine could go 1.5" forward. That would not be enough to fit the extra length. Moving the transaxle back farther is not an option.
I agree its probably too long, some MAJOR reengineering would have to take place. But its fun to dream. Really the best and easiest option is a Chevy crate motor but I have always looked to be different.
 
... easiest option is a Chevy crate motor but I have always looked to be different.
I switched to the Toyota because I blew 2 LS engines. Not down on the LS's, I just NEEDED a change....

It's also nice opening the tail and have *everybody* ask what that engine is.

But driving the car with the LS-7 vs a Turbo DOHC 4L .... it's a night and day difference. Neither "better", just wildly different. The grunt of the big cubes, vs the kick from the turbo. With the turbo, on a new-to-you track when you get comfortable enough to keep the revs up, all of a sudden those corners come up MUCH faster than they did the previous lap.
 
BTW, Hartley builds up those Toyota V12s. He will provide you a 950hp NA motor.
Hartley is who I was thinking about. But the big power V12 from Hartley needs race gas. The best pump fuel here is 94 octane. And as a solid street motor the V12 can make 500 HP easily. The biggest challenge is cams. Really not a lot of aftermarket support for the V12, even in Japan.
 
I switched to the Toyota because I blew 2 LS engines. Not down on the LS's, I just NEEDED a change....

It's also nice opening the tail and have *everybody* ask what that engine is.

But driving the car with the LS-7 vs a Turbo DOHC 4L .... it's a night and day difference. Neither "better", just wildly different. The grunt of the big cubes, vs the kick from the turbo. With the turbo, on a new-to-you track when you get comfortable enough to keep the revs up, all of a sudden those corners come up MUCH faster than they did the previous lap.
I can imagine the difference. Where did you have your 1UZ V8 built?
 
I can imagine the difference. Where did you have your 1UZ V8 built?
I had a local shop build a long block. Nothing fancy, just rods/pistons/head & main studs/valve springs. Then a bit more than a week ago, I dropped a valve in that motor. Have a race next week, so I have dropped in a BONE STOCK 1UZ and turned down the boost.

The built motor now needs at least a piston and a head. Probably needs a new sleeve. Good news is a low mileage JDM engine is $695. And you can sell a few parts off it as well... Hard to beet an Aluminum 6-bolt main block and a forged crank for less than $700.

Because it's turbo, I did not do cams. Figured I'd see how well it performs with stock cams. It is VVTi so I can adjust overlap.
 
New here, I have been considering building a SLC for a couple years, and now I find myself with the time and resources to do it. I know it is probably anathema around here to bring it up, but I think a really "sick" drive train might be a pure electric or hybrid. I have searched these forums and there is very little mention of hybrid or pure electric builds. I live in MA and we have a quite a few people here that are doing Tesla conversions on a number of platforms. They are getting 600+ HP/ 480 ft/pound from a single stock tesla drive unit, conversions are getting almost plug and play now with the new generation of standalone controllers. Pretty sure it would fit in place of the trans on a SLC, leaving lots of room for batteries where the motor usually goes. There are also interesting small 50-100 hp motors that could possibility be made to fit on each of the front wheels, and provide AWD/torque vectoring. I know there has been one electric build a few years ago, and I think Fran has mentioned some in house builds on a few occasions. The technology is progressing really fast at this point, and its probably only a matter of time before with see a dedicated EV "kit" car.

If you hate full EV, another idea I have heard talked about on some EV forums is using a VR38DETT out of GTR, a inline electric motor from a Porsche cayenne or WV turage, mate it up to the Graziano. The VR38 is a short motor ~22 inches dressed, the cayenne electric motor is only ~4 inches long, probably could get them to mate up with adapter plates. VR38 stock is putting out 600/ 481ft/pound (and has a very large tuning community around it) the cayenne motor is 83 hp/ 210 ft/pound. You are looking at ~700 hp/~700 ft/pound with a really flat torque curve.

Anyway, just thoughts. I probably won't go down the electric route for my build, but it really is tempting.

Bob
 
I can't recall if anyone has ever used the engine that the Graz is normally used with - the Audi 8 or 10, or Lambo 10?
 
There are also interesting small 50-100 hp motors that could possibility be made to fit on each of the front wheels, and provide AWD/torque vectoring. I know there has been one electric build a few years ago, and I think Fran has mentioned some in house builds on a few occasions. The technology is progressing really fast at this point, and its probably only a matter of time before with see a dedicated EV "kit" car.
An Aero-based electric commuter car would have got my money. I've just bought a McLaren 12C to fill that role though.

The McLaren drivetrain would be nice in an SLC, assuming that it fits. It's quite expensive though.
 
A New engine from Cadillac: the Blackwing.

Cadillac Blackwing Engine

"The Cadillac Blackwing engine is an internal combustion engine developed by General Motors for Cadillac luxury automobiles.
http://gmauthority.com/blog/gm/cadillac/cadillac-engines/cadillac-blackwing-engine/
"The current Blackwing engine is the 4.2 liter V8. Assigned GM RPO code LTA, the eight-cylinder, Dual-Overhead Cam (DOHC) gasoline engine is the result of a new clean-sheet design. It’s also Cadillac’s first-ever twin-turbo V-8 engine. The Blackwing first launched on the 2019 Cadillac CT6.

"The Cadillac Blackwing engine (LTA) is a clean-sheet design that was developed with the goal of delivering exceptional power density. It also introduces various unique design elements developed to balance performance and efficiency with compact, mass-efficient packaging."

http://gmauthority.com/blog/gm/cadillac/cadillac-engines/cadillac-blackwing-engine/
 
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