Trailer - Need Recommendations / Advice

Bill Kearley

GT40s Supporter
I just bought a 24 foot ATC all aluminum with a wide left hand door. no more squeeze and bump. One hell of a lot better than the Wells Cargo junk I had in the past.
 
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I just bought a 24 foot ATC all aluminum with a wide left hand door. no more squeeze and bump. One hell of a better than the Wells Cargo junk I had in the past.
Those are great trailers. I raced out of an ATC trailer and it was a dream to tow, and a great place to be while at the track. Mine had AC, a viewing deck, etc.
 

Callaghan

Lifetime Supporter
Just bought a Futura... little pricey but no more ramps and easy (fairly) to use. Has a recovery winch. So far so good.
 

Bill Kearley

GT40s Supporter
Yup, nice and bright,120 power, cabinets but I may install 4 more tie downs for the short car and the winch that's in the Wells Cargo.
Haven,t had the 40 in the ATC yet, any trouble with the ramp angle?
 
Hello all! Need comments on enclosed trailer for Superlite GT-R. 15 ft long, 9 ft wheelbase, 3 ft overhang, 80 in wide. I have no trailer experience. My thoughts: 20 ft box, E track on floor, 83 in between wheel wells, beavertail, access door fwd rh side, winch. I see no way to get in or out of the car in the trailer unless selecting a unit similar to those that Neil and Steve recommend. I think I am resigned to winching it in and out. Thoughts?
Then axles, sprung or torsion? Tongue, extended? Other?
Thanks, Mike
 

Doug Dyar

Supporter
Recently purchased a Futura brand all aluminum tilt bed trailer. Absolutely fantastic. Only weighs 1400 lbs. My F150 5.0 tows it like it isn't even back there. It's made to haul race cars, not skid loaders.

This is my third trailer after owning both open and closed models. The tie down system alone is worth the price. No more crawling around under and over to hook all the tie downs up. Very low deck height. Doesn't even need ramps or 2x4s.

Definitely get a winch. You guys without one are wearing the hell out of your clutch every time you load and unload.
 

Terry Oxandale

Skinny Man
Similar situation Mike, EXCEPT, the McLaren is easy to get out of once in the trailer. With that said, I never drive the car into the trailer. I winch it in and out...the winch is essential. My car is 73" at the wheels, and 83" on the spoiler, so it is tight, and doesn't have much margin for error if I was to try and drive it into the trailer without another set of eyes. With a remote winch switch, the winching is super easy.

My 3' overhang up front required a set of fabricated ramps that prevented dragging the nose. My trailer is a 20' Interstate Victory trailer, and appears to be well-built. I contemplated a 24' trailer due to some tight turns I needed to negotiate, and to date have no qualm going with the shorter trailer. I have no choice but to use an enclosed trailer due to the nature of my car, as well as distances needed to find a nice track, and simple security for the car and supporting equipment.

The ramps were an easy affair of 6' long 2 x 12 wood, three layers deep so that the ramp-door edge sits on the high end of the ramp, allowing the car to "step up" each layer until safely on the door-ramp. I installed E-track on both walls so that I could easily install overhead beam/shelves to carry stuff as needed, and other shorter E-track sections for a hammock for those times when I just want to rest. Bought a bunch of LED lighting for the inside, which has been great for night set-ups.
 
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Check out Futura Trailers.
Ive a cobber with a single axle version of these, has his Cobra in it under a alloy top cover that works off the trailer hydraulics, no doors etc, just cover operated by hyd rams etc, have a pic somewhere, a bit on the $$$ side but all he needs, GT40 loaded backwards would work fine & these trailers have one of the lowest deck angles around and best of all you wouldnt know there is a car inside.. Ill have a look for his pics & add later if I find em.
 

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Randy V

Admin
Lifetime Supporter
Thanks to all for comments. Any comments about sprung vs torsion axles?
Torsion axles are known for a better ride and also lower trailer height. That said, sprung axles cann easily be dampened by adding shock absorbers at each wheel. However, you have many more wear points with shackles, rockers, etc. If you go this route, look into MorRyde’s Wet-Bolt and thick shackle kits. eTrailer.com is where I buy most of my stuff..
 

Scott

Lifetime Supporter
I just ordered an Aerovault MKII. The big advantage for me is that it only weighs 2,300 pounds so I can easily tow it behind my wife's mid-size Mercedes SUV. It was designed by Peter Brock and it's incredibly cool from an engineering and construction point of view. It's a 100% aluminum semi monocoque with the exception of the composite roof. The underside is completely flat, the tongue beam runs to the rear axle, the tires are actually balanced, it comes with a remote controlled winch, etc. etc.



Apparently it's a dream to tow and it's rock stable passing 18 wheelers at 80 MPH... not that I expect to put that to test.
 
I am assuming you trailer a GT40 with the rear in front so that the engine/trans weight is on the tongue right?

Depending on if you have a left or right hand drive, that would make a difference in which side (potentially) you have a side door on your trailer.

E
 

Scott

Lifetime Supporter
Eric,

I don't have the trailer yet, but I'll be towing an SL-C. The primary use case appears to be winching the car in/out (it comes with a remote controlled winch with synthetic rope, battery, charger, etc.). I'm good with that approach because there's 3" clearance on the sides and 17" in front/back. Note that there are doors on both the left and right sides of the curved section to provide access to the front tie down points.

It's my understanding that most (perhaps all) mid-engine and rear engine cars that they're aware of are loaded nose first. Time will tell...
 

Larry L.

Lifetime Supporter
It's my understanding that most (perhaps all) mid-engine and rear engine cars that they're aware of are loaded nose first. Time will tell...
From personal experience I can tell you a mid/rear-engine car should be loaded rear end first. 'Not enough weight on the tongue otherwise (unless it's a really looong trailer and the car is as far forward of the axles as possible). Loading nose first will create a 'tail-wagging-the-dog' situation from a 'control' standpoint. It'll scare the ever-lovin' bejeebers outta ya at anywhere near highway speeds. The faster you tow - the MORE the trailer will swing side-to-side behind you. The trailer will be trying to make your tow vehicle mirror the same action.

In the end, both the tow vehicle and the trailer could end up on their sides...or worse.
 
From personal experience I can tell you a mid/rear-engine car should be loaded rear end first. 'Not enough weight on the tongue otherwise (unless it's a really looong trailer and the car is as far forward of the axles as possible). Loading nose first will create a 'tail-wagging-the-dog' situation from a 'control' standpoint. It'll scare the ever-lovin' bejeebers outta ya at anywhere near highway speeds. The faster you tow - the MORE the trailer will swing side-to-side behind you. The trailer will be trying to make your tow vehicle mirror the same action.

In the end, both the tow vehicle and the trailer could end up on their sides...or worse.
In my experience and what I have been told the above is correct. I would think the only way to get the correct tongue weight would be to load the car with the rear in first so the engine/transmission weight works to your benefit.

Five things that really help when towing an enclosed trailer (tag-along, or ball hitch).
1. Towing vehicle weight equal to or more than the trailer loaded.
2. A long towing vehicle wheelbase (think 4-door F250)
3. A 24' trailer (wheels back)
4. Load equalizer hitch
5. Get your tongue weight right. (very important)

You might be thinking "I do not need a 24' trailer", and you might be correct except when it comes to pulling a tag-along. It really helps to have the trailer wheels back from the hitch. It makes everything more stable.

Once a smart man told me these rules (Thanks RT) and he was precisely correct. So if you are buying an enclosed trailer, consider a 24'.

Eric
 
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