Upgrades/options and mods to P2125

Steve,

Your car is beautifully clean and tasteful, almost to the point of being obscenely so! :laugh3:

I'm curious about the screen and cover you put over your front brake duct. While I can see the desire to put something there, i.e. a screen, to keep rocks, bugs etc. from traveling through the system, it seems the slotted cover has blanked off the vast majority of your air inlet, essentially defeating the purpose of the whole thing.

Can you explain your line of reasoning with that particular modification? I know that Ford decided that ducting ambient air from the front end directly to the rotors was over-cooling them, and with the Mk II they changed the air source to behind the radiator, so that the brakes were being cooled with heated air. That might make sense at Le Mans, where brake temperatures are truly stratospheric, and the thermal shock of going from surface-of-the-sun hot, to very cold, again and again, would take its toll over time. However, at our levels, I would think that the temperature delta would be considerably less, and ambient air cooling would work just fine (and would be preferable to no cooling at all).

I look forward to hearing your explanation of your decision to blank off most of the cooling duct. :inquisitive:

And please continue sharing as your already-beautiful car continues to improve, day after day! :thumbsup:
Mike
Look above in the Video and Pictures Buffet; GT40 Restoration photos; at GT40 MkII 1032. The front air intake is located in the same place as is Steve's P2125. The air is picked up from two inlets in the front of the nose and routed to the disc. For our normal driving I agree that the front brake cooling isn't necessary, but if you track the car it would greatly help. After a day at VIR, my brake oil needs to be changed without the disc cooling. I should probably should always do that after that kind of hard driving. Screens would help keeping the stones out of the ducting.
 
Mike
Look above in the Video and Pictures Buffet; GT40 Restoration photos; at GT40 MkII 1032. The front air intake is located in the same place as is Steve's P2125. The air is picked up from two inlets in the front of the nose and routed to the disc.
True, structurally, that's the way the cars were built, and I think you're right, that's how they were plumbed in '66. However, I believe they had a change of heart, and the Mk II cars that ran in '67 followed the design of the Mark IV cars, and picked up air from behind the radiator, rather than outside, ambient air. The structure of the car remained basically unchanged; the difference was in the implementation, with the existing holes in the body and chassis ignored, and new ones fabricated.

Unfortunately I'm in Spain at the moment without access to the various books etc. that detail this little bit of trivia.


For our normal driving I agree that the front brake cooling isn't necessary, but if you track the car it would greatly help. After a day at VIR, my brake oil needs to be changed without the disc cooling. I should probably should always do that after that kind of hard driving.
On my GT350, I found a noticeable improvement in brake performance and longevity when I incorporated ambient air cooling, mimicking that used by Shelby on the R-models. For track driving, brake cooling works!

Screens would help keeping the stones out of the ducting.
That's one thing I failed to consider with my Mustang; I did once get a stone trapped between the face of the duct and the rotor, which made a highly disconcerting noise. Fortunately the stone was softer than the rotor and quickly ground itself to dust without harming the rotor....
 
Unfortunately I'm in Spain at the moment without access to the various books etc. that detail this little bit of trivia.

Going to the F1 race?
 
Going to the F1 race?
HAH! No, I'm at 'work'. Last week my C-5 broke down in Mazer-e-Sharif, Afghanistan (big hydraulic system leak) and I had to spend two days living in a tent. Fortunately it was an Air Force tent, meaning it was fully air conditioned, and had electrical power and internet access. :>)



We finally got out of there, passed through Iraq and then went to Spain. The next day we were supposed to depart and developed another huge hydraulic system leak, this one requiring new pipes to be fabricated at a factory in the USA and flown out here, so I've been stuck for several days. Fortunately the base is only 20 minutes from the Jerez GP circuit, so I dashed out there for the MotoGP race...



But this is blatant thread-hijacking! Let's get back to talking about genuinely interesting stuff--this most beautiful and well-prepared SPF GT40! :thumbsup:
 
Looking good....I used to fly and shoot my taxes downrange in and afternoon and blow stuff up. Good friends and good times. Boy think of all the stuff you can bring back on that airplane. Stopoff in the Azores and load up a caved corner bar, fresh German beer, etc. Say do you still fly with your feet on the dash and read paperbacks?
 
:wrongforum:

Grady, I really do appreciate your interest, but seriously, this is thread hijacking, which isn't cool--and I'm guilty of it too. :sad: I'm more than happy continue this over in the paddock if you like, but let's keep this thread for P2125, eh?

Perhaps one of the forum wizards can cull the irrelevant posts (including mine) from this thread and move them there?

Thanks! :thumbsup:
 
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Steve C

Steve
GT40s Supporter
OK, OK I've had enough; next week going to go "off roading"

Thanks guys, appreciate the compliments.

Steve P2125

PS: If anyone is interested in the Pathfinder rear brackets (as shown above I did not use them) I will send the rear brackets, tools and instructions. Will send to first who asks.

P2125
 
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