Inner Fender Splash Shields

Just received my shields (Thank you Fran) and looking for some pictures (installed) and advice. The picture below shows (left to right), the front forward shield (covers back of headlights), the convoluted shield (that goes in front of the rear tire), and the larger shield that goes exactly where. It appears to have a molded area for a cut-out and I assume that's for the rear tail lamps. I have the pieces at the office and not here with the car, but I'm not visualizing exactly the mount location - specifically looking at the angled end tabs.

The convoluted splash gets cut on the ridges to allow air flow? Is that correct.

Lastly -- looking for bonding suggestions. Allan quickly shot me a note about 3M 08115 - pretty pricey, and the application gun that is sold separately (two rod plunger) appears to cost more than the bonding material. And if this is stuff to use - then it is what it is.

Open to all advice and suggestions --- I only want to do this once and correctly.

Thanks - Mike
 

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Dave Lindemann

Lifetime Supporter
Mike - Very nice - I wish I had those!

As far as bonding goes - one of the best materials for bonding fiberglass to fiberglass is...........fiberglass! And it's inexpensive - though potentially much messier than the 3M adhesive. Be sure the body is in it's "normal" position before proceeding. Mix your resin with Cabosil thickener to create a paste. Apply that to the flange surfaces and press the piece into place - the thickened resin/paste will make up for the minor variances in the surfaces. Have a method for pressing and holding the piece to the body and then apply fiberglass cloth (or mat) over both sides of the seam. My $.02.

Dave L
 
I would position/"bond" it in with Durglass, then lay some fiberglass over the durglass. That won't be going anywhere.
 
Just received my shields (Thank you Fran) and looking for some pictures (installed) and advice. The picture below shows (left to right), the front forward shield (covers back of headlights), the convoluted shield (that goes in front of the rear tire), and the larger shield that goes exactly where. It appears to have a molded area for a cut-out and I assume that's for the rear tail lamps. I have the pieces at the office and not here with the car, but I'm not visualizing exactly the mount location - specifically looking at the angled end tabs.

The convoluted splash gets cut on the ridges to allow air flow? Is that correct.

Lastly -- looking for bonding suggestions. Allan quickly shot me a note about 3M 08115 - pretty pricey, and the application gun that is sold separately (two rod plunger) appears to cost more than the bonding material. And if this is stuff to use - then it is what it is.

Open to all advice and suggestions --- I only want to do this once and correctly.

Thanks - Mike
X-Two on 3M8115 Panel Bonding Adhesive. Glassing it in will also work, but the bond will never be as strong as if it was laid as one piece because they are separate cured parts. 8115 is designed to bond panels together and will be stronger if done properly.

You don't need the gun. You can despense it by moving each plunger the same distance and then mix it with a popsicle stick.

Rough both surfaces with 80 grit and clean them. Use a popsicle stick to apply the 8115 to both surfaces using pressure to really get it into the sanding groves. You can slowly heat the area to speed the curing rate also.
 
Me three on the Panel Bonding Adhesive it comes in 5, 15, 30 min cure times so you can hold them exactly where you want them while they set but once there set there set you will have to pretty much destroy them to get them off. You can use it as caulking around the panels too to blend them in for a nice finish and it not near as messy as FG. Also You might be able to rent the gun from a auto body supply shop. With the front wheel panel make sure your head lights are in place so you don't set it to close to the front and your splitter supports are in place so you have room for the braces near the rear. The back panels don't slot the louvers completely from side to side stagger the holes like 3 short 2 long 3 short etc.. to keep some strength in the panel.
and if your running your exhaust out the sides make sure you cut the panels to fit around the exhaust pipes before you cut the slots as you may need to leave some FG in some areas where you might have put a slot.
Cheers,
 
I would say the biggest piece covers from > the smaller vented part in front of the rear wheel > over the rear wheel > to the bottom of the taillight.

I would use the 3M stuff as its way easier to handle using the gun, especially if your car is already painted and you don't want resin running all over it.

First make sure the rear body parts are aligned and in the normal position, I would be concerned that if the rear lid was upside down when bonding in the wheel tub it might end up in a tweaked position and not fit down the way it used to afterwards. Plus, setting the gaps between the inner fender parts would be difficult this way.

I don't think this is a concern for the front clip as it is really stiff in this area and probably will not flex out of position unless some unusual pressure is applied.

One tip - Use a hot mix of Body Filler to tack the parts in place, it sets up quick and they will not move afterwards unless you break them out. I suppose if you tacked them in while in place on the car you could turn the lid over and bond them in without as much fear of movement.
 

Dave Lindemann

Lifetime Supporter
You guys must be really messy when working with fiberglass .......;-) A little resin goes a long way! Just kidding. While I've never used the 3M product I have no doubt it's good - it comes from Minnesota!

Dave L
 
Be sure the body is in it's "normal" position before proceeding. Dave L
Mesa -First make sure the rear body parts are aligned and in the normal position....

Thanks you all for the feedback on products. Dave, Mesa wise advise to heed.

Regards -- Mike
 
Thanks Ken, I wanted and ordered the abridged version of the kit...just the basics. I was picking pebbles/debris from every crevice in the engine bay after a short jaunt around the hood. --- Mike
 
Looks like A are for closing the sides of the body to the frame along side the gas tank, what are B for?
From what I gather per the pics grabbed from this site - "A" goes over the front wheel, see 1st picture. No idea where "B" goes. For the other pieces, see other pics. I'm doing some mock-up and temp. fitting tomorrow. I'll know more (or have more questions) about the larger rear wheel "tub" piece then.
 

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Went to a local body shop supply store this morning. They had a competitors product to the 3M 08115 - a little cheaper with an application gun - both under $99.00

I'll be using this: Lord Fusor FUS-147 STRUCTURAL ADHESIVE MED, 10.1 - application gun: FUS-301

Description
Structural Urethane Installation Adhesive (Medium-Set), 10.1 oz.
Substrates: Installation and bonding of SMC, fiberglass, and painted and primed metal Applications: Installation and bonding of body panels, spoilers and large ground effects • E High strength • E Easy to gun, non-sag formula
OEM Approvals

• Ford: Meets SMC bonding specs; Recommended in SMC bonding TSBs
• GM: Meets SMC bonding specs; Recommended in SMC bonding TSBs
• Chrysler: Recommended in SMC bonding TSBs; Recommended in wind-noise sealing TSBs
 

Ken Roberts

Supporter
I used Lord Fusor 127EZ when I restored my Corvette. Took about 4 tubes of the stuff.

Be careful with the 147 as you only have about 5 to 7 minutes of workability. It's okay for smaller panels where "fitup" is quick. On bigger panels it will take a few minutes to just lay the bead of adhesive down on the part alone before fitting.

Fitting the front panel/shield in behind the headlights is a bit of a task and will require more than five munutes to wiggle it in to correct position.

I would recommend the 127EZ or 120.
 
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Ken - yes sir you are correct. About 5-7 minutes of work time - no fooling around and everything needs to be carefully setup and ready.
 
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