Very, Very Famous People . . .

Robert S.

Gold Supporter
#4
forgot this guy..…………………….
Thanks Howard!

Steve McQueen was and remains one of my favorite actor and person. In my early to late teenage days, I would often see him getting a sandwich at the local heath eatery shop between Palm Springs proper, and Palm Desert. He often frequented Mama Banducci's Italian Resturante along Palm Canyon. In the day, you could sit out front of that resturant, and watch everyone cruise Palm Canyon. I was envious of him when he hooked up with Ali MacGraw - what a cutie she was. They were only married for one year during 1980, strangely. I didn't have a photo of him in a Gulf Car jump suit until you just sent me one. I'll add that for when I post this composition again.

Banduccis.jpg

I did wonder quite a bit why he elected to produce a race car film subsequent to the GT40 era. I think he missed the boat there. I also found it amazing that he leased car p1074, and then he tore the roof off to make it a camera car. He said he needed a car that could keep up with the race cars. 1. I'm amazed he leased it. 2. I'm more amazed that the owner of the car allowed him to tear the roof off. I'm even more amazed what it must have cost in an attempt to rebuild the car, especially knowing that the saved the light weight parts from the Mirage, but didn't or couldn't reinstall them ??? At the auction in 2011 when the car sold for $11M, even though they were only expecting $5M, they said it included the Mirage parts!

NOTES FROM MY WEB SITE:
"With its former driver, Jacky Ickx behind the wheel of a Ferrari 512S at the filming of the 1070 24 Hours of Le Mans race, the P/1074 participated as a film car with two cameras located in the spare tire well and a gyroscopically-stabilized, air-powered, 180-degree Arriflex camera mounted in the rear deck and controlled inside the cockpit by remote control. Another 35 mm camera was mounted above the passenger side door. The additional weight and downgraded aerodynamics from the film modifications made reaching the 150 mph top speed difficult, and required a great deal of skill to control at the triple-digit speeds."
"After the filming, the car exchanged owners and ended up with collector Sir Anthony Bamford in 1972. Under his ownership, the Ford GT40 was reconstructed by Willie Green with a new roof panel, early GT40 doors with “rocker” handles, new rear bodywork from a standard GT40 with wider wheel flares and a lack of air outlets and carbon fiber reinforcement. The P/1074 was then sold back to Harley E. Cluxton III, who had originally sold it to Bamford, and was restored once again."

p1074rear.jpg

p1074_filming.JPG

Also, SEE THIS: GT40 p1074 Gulf Mirage


Thanks, Soulcoaxer
 
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Neil

New Member
#6
Robert S;


According to John Horsman, it was JWAE who removed the top of p1074 so that cameras could be installed. He also said that the removal of the top reduced the chassis stiffness so much that it effected the handling of the car.


Regards, Neil Tucson, AZ
 
#9
The picture of a topless 40 filming in the rain brought back a memory for me. Some 50 years ago Boeing was conducting a FAA cert test on the 747. The test plane was required to accelerate upto takeoff speed and run through a water trough to demonstrate that engines could not be washed down during wet takeoffs.


Speeds were high and the ability to film this test was put the question as to how to match the speed and get in close. Not sure who came up with the idea of using a 67 Corvette 427 coupe with rear glass removed so a cameraman could kneel in the opening. Biggest problem was not with the car or the cameraman, but which one of the test pilots was going to do the driving. Test and filming were successful and the rear glass was re-installed and the Corvette was sold to the public.
 

Robert S.

Gold Supporter
#13
'A stylish couple in the rain in London (1963)' in part 3 shows actor Tom Courtenay with (probably) Julie Christie.
Thank you Colin! You added another interesting fact for the presentation.
I just finished adding those names to the English couple in Part III. Check it out if you desire to.

Cheers, Soulcoaxer, Robert
 

Robert S.

Gold Supporter
#14
The picture of a topless 40 filming in the rain brought back a memory for me. Some 50 years ago Boeing was conducting a FAA cert test on the 747. The test plane was required to accelerate upto takeoff speed and run through a water trough to demonstrate that engines could not be washed down during wet takeoffs.

Speeds were high and the ability to film this test was put the question as to how to match the speed and get in close. Not sure who came up with the idea of using a 67 Corvette 427 coupe with rear glass removed so a cameraman could kneel in the opening. Biggest problem was not with the car or the cameraman, but which one of the test pilots was going to do the driving. Test and filming were successful and the rear glass was re-installed and the Corvette was sold to the public.
What a great piece of history. I could not help but notice that you own a classic Corvette. I currently have two and have enjoyed them since I bought by first one in 1971. It was a dealer's car though. I couldn't afford a new one. I road in the first Corvette when one of my father's friends owned one. In junior high (middle school to some) at age 13, he gave be a ride with the top down. His was a very early model. Maybe a 56. I couldn't even think of buying one 'til 1971 and I was 26 years old. In-between 13 to 26, I was traumatized by an event up at Lake Arrowhead, CA. In 1965, I purchased my first new car: Mustang GT convertible. It was a 289 with 225 HP. I was up at the lake and a couple of older guys walked in front of my car and they said loud enough for me to hear, look, it's a poor man's Corvette.
 
#15
Robert, we old Corvette drivers always seem to wind up in the same places. I have had a number of corvettes over my 73 years. Currently I have a 54 and a 2000 convertible. Both are white, with red interiors and beige tops.


Still show the 54 and my 40 in the Phoenix area. Both tend to draw a crowd. When I was a young man there were no car shows and the little town where I was born, no Corvettes and especially no 40's.


I try to let people see these vehicles and when I find well behaved kids, offer to let parents take pictures of them sitting in the car. These things weren't available way back when and I like introducing the next generation to these fine old cars.
 

Robert S.

Gold Supporter
#16
Robert, we old Corvette drivers always seem to wind up in the same places. I have had a number of corvettes over my 73 years. Currently I have a 54 and a 2000 convertible. Both are white, with red interiors and beige tops.

Still show the 54 and my 40 in the Phoenix area. Both tend to draw a crowd. When I was a young man there were no car shows and the little town where I was born, no Corvettes and especially no 40's.

I try to let people see these vehicles and when I find well behaved kids, offer to let parents take pictures of them sitting in the car. These things weren't available way back when and I like introducing the next generation to these fine old cars.
Tom,
When I purchased my 2011 Z07 vet, I did take that to a few cars and coffee meets. Those visits got me used to large crowds and car shows. It wasn't long before my GT40 car appeared. I added a few things, learned to drive it safely in the wee hours (way too much traffic in Orange County) during normal daylight. Before long I signed up for a bunch of car shows. They never really knew where to put me, but they always placed me in a high visibility area. I won best engine at the first show. http://gt40zone.com/YLCS_trophy_pict.jpg That was not my wife or girlfriend. It was one of the judges that took pity on me and volunteered to be in the pict. I quickly learned that buying two car-show spots assured me that I could open my doors fully on each side if I desired, and had more room for friends to sit with me. I often went a mile to explain my car when the inquiries came. When I was at car shows at the churches, which are frequent, I would then go the EXTRA mile and let people and their children get behind the wheel, and I assisted by using the their phone camera video to capture their excitement. Sharing is always a good thing.

Keep up the good work Tom. We shall talk again. Soulcoaxer
 

Robert S.

Gold Supporter
#17
I did forget to mention that the photos contained in this thread are being provided off my server. Why is that important?

When members load-up a pict or video onto the forum's server, there is hardly ever a need to change or modify the images on that thread. And, the forum seldom approves such.

When a video or pict is loaded onto a private server, as the picts in this thread were, then I can make changes. Someone sent me the name of two of the people on Part three of the photos montage. I was able to add their name beneath the picture.

However, I fogot to mention that if you are viewing picts and videos from a private server, you need to refresh the site page. The reason is that typical home computers have a ram program that enables you to return to a web site, or web page more quickly. Actually, a lot faster than when you visited the first time. The ram program creates "COOKIES" of various visits to web sites. So, when you go there after a change was made, you wont see it. You'll only see the images the cookie shows you from your first visit.

To refresh your screen to enable you to view all changes, simply hit the return key after you land on the page, and that will refresh the screen enabling you to see any changes. This process is not needed for items on the forum server. HTH. Soucoaxer
 
#18
Thanks Howard!

Steve McQueen was and remains one of my favorite actor and person. In my early to late teenage days, I would often see him getting a sandwich at the local heath eatery shop between Palm Springs proper, and Palm Desert. He often frequented Mama Banducci's Italian Resturante along Palm Canyon. In the day, you could sit out front of that resturant, and watch everyone cruise Palm Canyon. I was envious of him when he hooked up with Ali MacGraw - what a cutie she was. They were only married for one year during 1980, strangely. I didn't have a photo of him in a Gulf Car jump suit until you just sent me one. I'll add that for when I post this composition again.

View attachment 91177

I did wonder quite a bit why he elected to produce a race car film subsequent to the GT40 era. I think he missed the boat there. I also found it amazing that he leased car p1074, and then he tore the roof off to make it a camera car. He said he needed a car that could keep up with the race cars. 1. I'm amazed he leased it. 2. I'm more amazed that the owner of the car allowed him to tear the roof off. I'm even more amazed what it must have cost in an attempt to rebuild the car, especially knowing that the saved the light weight parts from the Mirage, but didn't or couldn't reinstall them ??? At the auction in 2011 when the car sold for $11M, even though they were only expecting $5M, they said it included the Mirage parts!

NOTES FROM MY WEB SITE:
"With its former driver, Jacky Ickx behind the wheel of a Ferrari 512S at the filming of the 1070 24 Hours of Le Mans race, the P/1074 participated as a film car with two cameras located in the spare tire well and a gyroscopically-stabilized, air-powered, 180-degree Arriflex camera mounted in the rear deck and controlled inside the cockpit by remote control. Another 35 mm camera was mounted above the passenger side door. The additional weight and downgraded aerodynamics from the film modifications made reaching the 150 mph top speed difficult, and required a great deal of skill to control at the triple-digit speeds."
"After the filming, the car exchanged owners and ended up with collector Sir Anthony Bamford in 1972. Under his ownership, the Ford GT40 was reconstructed by Willie Green with a new roof panel, early GT40 doors with “rocker” handles, new rear bodywork from a standard GT40 with wider wheel flares and a lack of air outlets and carbon fiber reinforcement. The P/1074 was then sold back to Harley E. Cluxton III, who had originally sold it to Bamford, and was restored once again."

View attachment 91175

View attachment 91176

Also, SEE THIS: GT40 p1074 Gulf Mirage


Thanks, Soulcoaxer
My wife who grew up in Santa Monica and in her teens at the time, was at Malibu beach one day. She ran into MeQueen, struck up a bit of a conversation, ended up body surfing a bit with him in the ocean. Ali MacGraw was on the beach, with her kid, from Robert Evans, yelling at him to get out of the water. Even the King of Cool got nagged! ;)

Phil Hill lived in her neighborhood so they would see him driving around, testing out his cars. Different but amazing times for sure.
 

Larry L.

Lifetime Premier Supporter
#20
...I was traumatized by an event up at Lake Arrowhead, CA. In 1965, I purchased my first new car: Mustang GT convertible. It was a 289 with 225 HP. I was up at the lake and a couple of older guys walked in front of my car and they said loud enough for me to hear, look, it's a poor man's Corvette.

There always have been and always will be those who revel in spewing put-downs. 'Must somehow make them feel 'superior' in some way even though, in reality, deep down they have to know they aren't.

My bet is that yo-yo probably drove a clunker his own darned self and wouldn't have been able to afford the license tabs on your 'Stang let alone actually own one like it.




A somewhat similar aside (AKA: 'sometimes you get even'):

I'll never forget the time when, back in fall of 1968 when I was attending college, I was driving my 4-door, '51 Plymouth 'beater' (and I DO mean "beater"!) to class one day when I saw a couple of young ladies who were in the same class with me walking to campus. I stopped and offered them a ride. They turned me down.

As it happened, while driving by on my way home a couple of weeks later, I stopped at the building wherein said class was held to pick up a couple books I needed...parked my 'other car' out front...ran in and got the books...ran back out to my car...and who do you suppose was standing there looking at it? Uh huh...believe it or not...one of the same two young ladies. To say the least, she seemed very surprised to find out the car was mine.

She asked if I'd take her for a ride in it. I said, 'You turned down the ride I offered the other day. My male ego hasn't recovered yet'...and I drove off.

The car? 1968 Corvette "T-Top"...435/427, 4-speed...




(Yeah...yeeew darned betcha I gloated...low-life peasant that I was - and still am. :evil: )
 
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