Stephan's SLC Build Log

Last year in August I posted a few pictures of a the beginning of the build of a Bonneville Land Speed Record Bike. I am certain that what I posted was everything but convincing and probably to some, just hot air. The bike is done for three month and I thought I owe an update on what kept me sidetracked and away from the SLC. What you see here is a Kawasaki 1972 H2 750 that started as a bare frame and empty engine cases.
Stage 3 Drag Racing engine 160HP on 91 Octane at 9000 RPM with huge flat side carbs and I have no idea what it will do on race gas or with NOS. Ducati racing dry clutch in one-off billet casing to transfer the power going through an undercut racing transmission. HP and max torque set in 300 RPM apart at around 6000 RPM and is like the ON switch to unleash hell. That is when you have to tuck in your balls, hold on to the dentures and make sure the underwear is absorbent. Reinforced frame and swing arm of my own design and fabrication, equipped with the biggest brakes on the market. All custom coachwork, stainless chambers, all digital electronics and street legal in PA :cool:. An insanely fast lightweight and dangerous at any speed. Someday I will put it in a trailer and just go after that Speed Demon...
 

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Randy V

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Amazing work! Your marble-bag is definitely bigger than mine!
@manta22 needs to see this post.. He does Bonneville with his car….
 
Spent some time with trimming and installing the carbon fiber door cards in preparation to fit the dash. It took and minute or two to get those properly fitted. On mine, the factory pre-cut left me with a huge gap to adjust. I started with a 6mm (1/4") distance from the door card to the inner door profile and was not sure where to start. The inner door profile is over 1 Meter (43") along the window, changes directions and constantly curves from the dash to the upper window edge. A job that can not be rushed and if you take too much material off you a screwed since the carbon fiber can not be patched. 3 hours later it was done and now they fit along the entire inner doors just perfectly. The pictures can not judge. I am not a friend of sheet metal screws in fiberglass und use decent hardware such as rivet nuts.
 

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Nice work Stephan, what tool(s) did you use to trim them down?
Hello Joel,

I am using the abrasive wheel cutting tool in the picture with Fiberglass, especially when Gelcoat is applied. The strong motor is consistent and gives you excellent control over the cut. Similar to a Dremmel but much stronger and the brushless motor does not heat up. I don't use any reciprocating tools such as hacksaw, jigsaw etc. at all to prevent chipping or delamination. In addition a good fine file set which I only use in the direction of the Gelcoat and never against it. A time robbing process but the outcome is worth it.
 

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Moving forward with the dashboard. On that subject I'll have more than one posting. The first thing I noticed was that the material thickness under the windshield on my car was very inconsistent and created a bumpy surface resulting in the dash to not fit that area very well. After reworking that the profile a much better fit. Next thing I was wondering about is on how to support that dash. From other builds I learned that bonded or bolted brackets and standoffs seem to be the way to go but I did not consider it for my build. I took a second look at the factory ducts and dash underside and decided that I'll use that as support by making a mold from the dash and apply it to the 50mm extended ducts. The dash is now supported over more than 26" instead of single point supports. The dash drops on the vent molds just before it hits the curve. It took some time to figure out the correct height but eventually I got there. The door cards determine the height of the dash facing the driver and passenger, creating a reference and demanding proper transition. When the dash was inserted it shifted to the left quite a bit. This is determined by the curved profile of the windshield. Everything I measured and believed when initially fitted the dash without the body, is down the drain. The dash is matching the door nicely on the driver side but I am missing 10 - 12mm on the passenger door. I read a few posts and must have looked at least at 25 - 30 sets of SLC interiors to get a better understanding on how to fit that dash. All the ones I found have an offset to the left and none that I found had a centered steering wheel in relation to the gauges so my car does the same thing. Giving it a moment to sink in I started to like that situation. I'll need to remove the steering offset by modifying the linkage, get the column center and straight and I'll be able to shift my seat to the left, make room for the rear seat anchors inboard and no angled seat. I am glad that I have not installed my seats yet. Here are a few pictures of the current progress.
 

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Johan

Supporter
Moving forward with the dashboard. On that subject I'll have more than one posting. The first thing I noticed was that the material thickness under the windshield on my car was very inconsistent and created a bumpy surface resulting in the dash to not fit that area very well. After reworking that the profile a much better fit. Next thing I was wondering about is on how to support that dash. From other builds I learned that bonded or bolted brackets and standoffs seem to be the way to go but I did not consider it for my build. I took a second look at the factory ducts and dash underside and decided that I'll use that as support by making a mold from the dash and apply it to the 50mm extended ducts. The dash is now supported over more than 26" instead of single point supports. The dash drops on the vent molds just before it hits the curve. It took some time to figure out the correct height but eventually I got there. The door cards determine the height of the dash facing the driver and passenger, creating a reference and demanding proper transition. When the dash was inserted it shifted to the left quite a bit. This is determined by the curved profile of the windshield. Everything I measured and believed when initially fitted the dash without the body, is down the drain. The dash is matching the door nicely on the driver side but I am missing 10 - 12mm on the passenger door. I read a few posts and must have looked at least at 25 - 30 sets of SLC interiors to get a better understanding on how to fit that dash. All the ones I found have an offset to the left and none that I found had a centered steering wheel in relation to the gauges so my car does the same thing. Giving it a moment to sink in I started to like that situation. I'll need to remove the steering offset by modifying the linkage, get the column center and straight and I'll be able to shift my seat to the left, make room for the rear seat anchors inboard and no angled seat. I am glad that I have not installed my seats yet. Here are a few pictures of the current progress.
Nice work Stephan, I did it pretty much the same exept the other way around. I extended the dash around the cut outs to reach the duct and then some bulb seals.
 

Kyle

Supporter
Have you sat in the car with the door cards on? I really don’t know how anyone drives with them, it’s tight as is.
 
Have you sat in the car with the door cards on? I really don’t know how anyone drives with them, it’s tight as is.
Hello Kyle,

I just sat in the car yesterday after the corrected steering column position toward the left and did not get the impression that is it is too tight for me. I can only speak for myself. I am 5'11" at 185 Lbs, so not the biggest guy, using Tillet B5s. Plenty of room on the left side for shoulder and arm. My passenger may has a different opinion since there is 2" less room to mount the seat. In my opinion the door cards are really a nice touch to the spartan SLC interior.
 
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