Dusty's SLC Build

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Just an update letting this wonderful forum know that I have not given up on this machine. My car has been waiting patiently all these months for her makeover. The builder’s name is Ricky Bray and he can manipulate metal. She will be making good progress now and I’m excited to Share it here.
 

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I’d like to give a little shout out to this Fabricator. About 10 years ago he was building desert race buggies/trucks and some of the best sprint cars in the world. He was also turning out some of the best hot rod and bike fabrication around. He lives in my hometown andeventually started seeing me as his physician. About that time I approached him and asked him and his partner Dave if they would like to build me a desert race car but with some of that amazing hot rod or fabrication thrown in. Rick kind of went crazy with the idea and made me this curvaceous race cars ever. She is called “the last starfighter”.
Over the years Rick has moved most all of his talents towards bikes. Last summer I asked him to take up this Slc project When he could fit her in. All of his time is been dedicated to finishing bikes for Sturgis but that is finally behind him. I’ll just throw up a few pictures I took of the car and a couple bike pics . Whenever possible He put Kurvs in that desert car. Straight lines and straight tube is always stronger but sometimes it’s worth it to add curves so that for the 99% of the time that the car is sitting it just looks good. Same goes with Slc
 

Neil

Supporter
I’d like to give a little shout out to this Fabricator. About 10 years ago he was building desert race buggies/trucks and some of the best sprint cars in the world. He was also turning out some of the best hot rod and bike fabrication around. He lives in my hometown andeventually started seeing me as his physician. About that time I approached him and asked him and his partner Dave if they would like to build me a desert race car but with some of that amazing hot rod or fabrication thrown in. Rick kind of went crazy with the idea and made me this curvaceous race cars ever. She is called “the last starfighter”.
Over the years Rick has moved most all of his talents towards bikes. Last summer I asked him to take up this Slc project When he could fit her in. All of his time is been dedicated to finishing bikes for Sturgis but that is finally behind him. I’ll just throw up a few pictures I took of the car and a couple bike pics . Whenever possible He put Kurvs in that desert car. Straight lines and straight tube is always stronger but sometimes it’s worth it to add curves so that for the 99% of the time that the car is sitting it just looks good. Same goes with Slc
It is a triumph of art if not engineering. Nice fab work!
 

Mark B.

Supporter
OK fine, I'll take them off your hands -- I'll even pay for shipping :D
Seriously though, that's some beautiful work! Can't wait to hear how it sounds!
 

Howard Jones

Supporter
I am also interested in what it is going to sound like. The 8 into 1 merge is really a work of art. I will really be watching how you finish off the big X brace when you are done.
 

Randy V

Moderator-Admin
Staff member
Admin
Lifetime Supporter
That is beautiful…. I am wondering just how much heat is going to be concentrated in that single collector and how you’re going to shield the rest of the world around it…. Something like a turbo-shield?
 
That is beautiful…. I am wondering just how much heat is going to be concentrated in that single collector and how you’re going to shield the rest of the world around it…. Somet
That’s a legitimate concern. Originally when I brought it to the Fabricator it was my idea just to put the collector on top of the factory brace and then cut a hole in the body so that the collector was out in the open for everyone to see and so that it could cool off without burning the bodywork. Shielding the collector underneath to take some of the heat off of the transaxle shouldn’t be that hard but the body might potentially be toasted by that collector.

Well Rick didn’t like the factory brace and easily convinced me to try and lower the collector closer to the Transaxle with this new curvy brace he built. As the collector sits now the headers and collector should fit under the bodywork. That might not be such a good thing. And the last thing I want to do is cover that sexy exhaust up with some heat shield. We are working on it. Perhaps build an entire new shield out of aluminum that covers up the rear of the car to some extent but then still allows the headers and collected to be visualized… Have been thinking about that
Rick is also going to fab up some valve covers that are a little more sexy.

This brace is not as strong as the factory brace. But will it be strong enough? I suspect so. It “feels” strong According to my subjectometer readings.
 

Howard Jones

Supporter
It appears that transverse loads are all concentrated to the point in the center of the rear of the modified brace under the exhaust. Any excessive lateral compression flex of the top X brace will transfer the moment loading to the lower ends of the vertical solid aluminum chassis members on each side. If allowed to continue this will more than likely result in weld failures at the point where they are joined to the lower horizontal fore aft chassis tubing. This is the purpose of the relative square and cross-braced design of the OEM brace. The transverse front section on the original design is nearly removed and the new design looks to focus load paths nearly directly to the 2 rear top corners of the total rear chassis box instead of all four. You apparently added the small curved tubing section under the collector to try and mitigate this but the resulting X brace shape is now more of a "U' instead of an "X".

The four top ends of the vertical chassis solid aluminum elements cannot be allowed to move as a result of loading. If they do the welds where they connect to the horizontal chassis elements at the bottom will be forced to absorb the energy instead of the entire structure, resulting in weld failures at those points. Adding a horizontal cross element between the front two vertical members will correct this issue somewhat and it appears you still have room for one.

Additionally, it appears that the rear triangularization links between the middle of the top rear horizontal X brace tube and the lower corners of the chassis have been omitted. IMHO you should at least add them. Without them then the whole rear chassis box has no real triangularization and will result in weld failures at the same points as discussed above. I would consider this imperative.

I hope that this is received as it was intended and not as a criticism. I kinda held off with this because I don't want to offend you, I really like the work you have done so far and I can't wait to hear it run.

My best, Howard.
 

Kyle

Supporter
I’d build a scoop like some have done for the intakes that rest in that area. Fiberglass will withstand a ton of heat, paint on top, not sure.

I’ve been on the forum only 2 years, I’ve sifted through people building these things for 6yrs plus. Some even die in the process. Just drive the damn thing and if it breaks you can fix it. Rant over.
 
That’s why I love this for him. Legit honest well-informed criticism. No offense taken at all. I have the exact same concern about the brace. With regard to the rear triangulation-All of that is going back in.

But the area at the top of the aluminum mounts also concerns me because we have that Bend that slopes down. When Rick takes off the header this weekend to go have it polished I’m going to bounce on that brace and get a feel for how tough it is. Further reinforcements may be in order. I need to tighten all those bolts up on that brace and see how it feels. I suppose that the bellcrank brace might also help reinforce the brace but I need to see. I even thought about some sort of hoop that goes on top of the Collector. The idea of further bracing under the collector might work well to. This issue is not over.
 
I’d build a scoop like some have done for the intakes that rest in that area. Fiberglass will withstand a ton of heat, paint on top, not sure.

I’ve been on the forum only 2 years, I’ve sifted through people building these things for 6yrs plus. Some even die in the process. Just drive the damn thing and if it breaks you can fix it. Rant over.
Yeah I want to drive this car. Not a show car.
 
ya i too want to drive it. This will be a daily driver. not a show car. though i suspect these slc's are basically a show every time you park them..
 

Chris Kouba

Supporter
Your fuel rail cross-over hose and the plastic intake might also need a little attention.

There's no denying the cool factor of the set up though!
 

Kyle

Supporter
ya i too want to drive it. This will be a daily driver. not a show car. though i suspect these slc's are basically a show every time you park them..
They are, and it’s annoying at times. Mine is still in primer and gets a ton of attention. The only time you’re lifting the ass end is at a car show or if it’s broken down. Lucky for you that exhaust is going to do more than enough for attention.
 

Howard Jones

Supporter
I had another idea you might consider. Since the rear engine/gearbox adapter plate along with the gearbox is essentially a solid rear cross-member across the bottom of the "box" adding a solid crossbar link to the adapter mounted from to top engine adapter mount bolts over to the top of the solid aluminum chassis member towers would serve to create an upper forward transverse element thus completing the front of the "box".

I think one of the racecar SLC's did something similar when it was designed to use a racing-only gearbox as a semi-stressed member.
 
I had another idea you might consider. Since the rear engine/gearbox adapter plate along with the gearbox is essentially a solid rear cross-member across the bottom of the "box" adding a solid crossbar link to the adapter mounted from to top engine adapter mount bolts over to the top of the solid aluminum chassis member towers would serve to create an upper forward transverse element thus completing the front of the "box".

I think one of the racecar SLC's did something similar when it was designed to use a racing-only gearbox as a semi-stressed member.
thanks for the ideas yesterday

I spent some time at Ricks shop last eve discussing with him the brace issue and other build details. Although the brace does "feel" pretty dang strong it does "look" compromised toward the rear. Im actually not so concerned about the brace construction at the front 2 mounts. if you see the new brace in person the arrangement is beefy even with the dip under the collector. it "looks" tough and seems as strong as the factory piece. The factory brace has those big arching tubes that connect to the heims at the aluminum mounts. Those arching members are the weakest part of the factory brace and are certainly where the factory brace would yield first. One the new brace, the arching arms are actually shorter in length that the factory arms but similarly look like they would be where the brace would first yield. The downward arching shape in the middle of the brace just doesn't look like it will yield in the area of the collector before the arms would yield.

The bend in the rearmost does bother me. like Howard suggested, Rick is going to build a pair of heim links going from the transaxle mount (where the factor heim links normally are) to the center of the rear horizontal dip in the new brace. The issue is not settled

we also ordered an aluminum fabricated intake manifold last night. we will modify it so that the throttle body and air filter fit on top of the intake manifold. Thats the plan for now
 
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