Electric Water Pump question

Dave Bilyk

Dave Bilyk
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Does anyone supply a bolt on adapter to replace the water pump entirely when fitting a separately mounted electric Pump?
I have a Davies Craig EWP115 and would like to remove my cast iron pump entirely. Would be prepared to make an adapter myself, but if anyone supplies one could save me the trouble :)
 

Randy V

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Dave, you may want to check my build site here:
GT-Forty.com

I describe the process on turning a waterpump into a proper water manifold.
I had explored alternatives but was convinced that Ford knew their engines better than I or anyone else did - so I just used their design...
 

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Dave,
Mine is similar to Randy's. I cut the impeller out and then Brian Magee freeze plugged the hole for me. I then just put the normal hose in. I have packaged the water pump in the engine bay. The alternator runs direct to the crank pulley.

Of course this is still all theory for me, as I still haven't managed to get to engine start yet! (getting closer though)

Here's a pic of it installed

8314068227_8043066cbd_c.jpg


and you can see some more pics here: http://www.gt40s.com/forum/gt40-build-logs/15571-bretts-rs-gtd-7.html#post316697
 

Dave Bilyk

Dave Bilyk
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Randy, thanks, I knew that I had seen that somewhere I had that picture in my head and that is what I planned, but on getting the pump off and feeling it's weight I wondered about making a much lighter pipe fabrication, hence the question.
Brett, thanks freeze plug is a good idea, great to see your progress, looking good!

Dave
 
Not my GT40 project but on a Mustang I'm currently building I modified a factory aluminum timing cover to eliminate the water pump. I went as far as to tap the block directly to accept 3/4" NPT fittings.

48E64190-68FC-4040-B53C-0AFC583C9B95_zpsm7wj2e0g.jpg


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Francis
 

Dave Bilyk

Dave Bilyk
Supporter
The mind boggles Francis:huh: I can see a lot of work has gone into that. Would like to see what it's like in the car and if the driver can see past the carbs! On a forty though you would be resting your arm on the alternator:stunned:
Dave
 
I took a little different route. I removed the entire water pump and sanded down the fit lines(351 Winsor). I then just welded up some hose ends, AN 10's i believe and ran them to the central cooling lines from the radiator. Wiring of the pump was the next task. I put a thermostat relay in the intake manifold to automatically turn the pump on If I forgot to turn it on manually from the dash after warm up. The An lines I had and they were already made up so I didn't shorten them. Might be a project for next winter, and decrease the clutter in that area. Oil filter was move to the rear to make room for the A/C which hasn't been hooked up to date.
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The intake line ran to the reservoir, then to the cooling tubes.
P1010236.jpg

The water pump is not a high flow model, and I have found you don't need one. With that and the cooling fans and a big radiator, I have never had an issue. Bbut then I haven't done an exteended track day either. Cruising on the interstates have not caused any issues. In fact I don't run the fans when I am cruising. Only in stop and go traffic. Those too are on a double manual switch and thermostat if I fail to notice a rise in temps.
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Bill
 

Dave Bilyk

Dave Bilyk
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Hi Bill, that's the sort of thing I was thinking of, either using braided pipe and fittings or a fabricated manifold which attaches to the existing pump feed hose. You seem to have individual feed pipes for each bank but I guess they come together at some point before ore after the tunnel. Very neat job on the timing cover.
Dave
 

Julian

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Randy, thanks, I knew that I had seen that somewhere I had that picture in my head and that is what I planned, but on getting the pump off and feeling it's weight I wondered about making a much lighter pipe fabrication, hence the question.
Brett, thanks freeze plug is a good idea, great to see your progress, looking good!

Dave

I took an aluminum water pump, gutted it and Tig welded a cover over the shaft hole (apologies for the quality of the photo) There is a significant difference in weight to the cast iron units.

Julian
 

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Dave Bilyk

Dave Bilyk
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Julian, thanks, that's yet another way to do it. Actually I do fancy the idea of making something up.
Hi Ian, I already have a Davies Craig pump, one reason is that I will be able to remove the bump on the bulkhead so I decided not to go with an engine mounted one.
Dave
 
Meziere, in Escondido CA, makes and both a remote electric pump and one that directly replaces the stock pump.
I have run both in a 40 and they work great.
Dave
 

Randy V

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Randy, thanks, I knew that I had seen that somewhere I had that picture in my head and that is what I planned, but on getting the pump off and feeling it's weight I wondered about making a much lighter pipe fabrication, hence the question.
Brett, thanks freeze plug is a good idea, great to see your progress, looking good!

Dave

Just to be clear, the pump housing I am using is alloy. I had it powder coated in Wrinkle Black to match the intake manifold.
 
You have to make a decision when you plan these things out. What options do you have for your type of engine?? Do you want the pump sticking out the front of the engine?? How far have you moved your engine forward?? The first time I installed the engine the stock water pump was literally under my elbow. Do you want a big hump in your firewall?? Do you have room at the front of the car for a pump?? I considered all of these and after 2 iterations came to the conclusion that the pump had to be at the front. I first tried to put it off to the side of the engine. This put too many hoses at the front of the engine, and too close to the exhaust. My front pulley for the alternator and A/C is 1 inch from the slanting portion of the firewall. So I had to keep the hoses to a minimum. I settled on the Moroso pump to handle the water.

Bill
 

Randy V

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You're right Bill, of course... I went through the very same gyrations as you and found a front mounted remote water pump to be the best solution. My "Manifold" was simple enough, light weight and would maintain the same flow characteristics as the OEM Ford pump..
 

Tim Kay

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Meziere, in Escondido CA, makes and both a remote electric pump and one that directly replaces the stock pump.
I have run both in a 40 and they work great.
Dave

Hey Briggs, nice to see your post and good to know you're still trolling the GT40s forums.

Any chance you have pics of the the pump installed on the SPF you could post?

Tim
 

Dave Bilyk

Dave Bilyk
Supporter
Randy, looks nice in the wrinkle black. The cast iron pump weighs 5.4kg/11.9lb, I don't know what the saving is but the ali pump will be a deal lighter. Not as big a difference as the timing case I would think though, which I checked when I changed, iron 6.4kg/14.1lb, ali 1.5kg/3.3lb

Bill, I already went with a remote front mounted pump, as my engine is very far forward, so far forward that even with the large hump, the pulley can grind against the bulkhead. I am tall, and the seat is right back, so when I shift my weight and I put any pressure on the seat back it deflects the bulkhead and the pulley bolts touch so the clearance will be about 1/8". A better bulkhead is on the cards, but the remote electric pump allows me to ditch the hump and get more space too. I already purchased a Davies Craig EWP115 and have now mostly installed the pump and controller. As for the mechanical pump, in the short term I will cut the nose off and seal it, and think about a more elegant solution as a project for the winter. Anything that saves weight and shifts some forward is good in my book.
Dave
 
Hi Dave,ffice:eek:ffice" /><?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com<img src=" /><o:p></o:p>
This is my solution for removing the std waterpump. I machine the timing case to remove all signs of the pump flange and then two 1¼” spigot pipes are then pressed into the cover. The nice thing about this conversion is that the bore size is not restricted or additional adapter plate, which gives another potential leak path. I’ve done this on 3 engines now with no issues.<o:p></o:p>
Regards<o:p></o:p>
Andy<o:p></o:p>
 

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Dave Bilyk

Dave Bilyk
Supporter
Micke and Andy, yes those are the lines along which I was thinking.
Andy, I like your spigot pipe idea -an elegant solution. I would love to do that, but I am trying to maintain time on the road. If I get carried away with these things, the car never gets out of the garage, so I intend to make something up later from measurements I take now while the pump is off, a couple of small flanges bolting on to the two ports, with a crosspipe and downpipe to couple up to existing inlet hose. For now I am whacking a core plug into the pump nose, plugging the weephole and using the car to test out the electric pump system. Then I can draw up the manifold and get it made with the car on the road.

Dave
 
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