Tornado Build - www.gt40builder.com

Trevor, Nice job on the fan mounting...top shelf.
Here is a link to the stuff I used on my coolant tubes, easy and cheap. This is the same stuff I use around exhaust etc, when running lines or cables.

Here is the link McMaster-Carr

Look at the heat dissipating fiberglass sleeving with silicone cover

Keep up the good work
Cheers
Phil
 
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Trevor, Nice job on the fan mounting...top shelf.
Here is a link to the stuff I used on my coolant tubes, easy and cheap. This is the same stuff I use around exhaust etc, when running lines or cables.

Here is the link McMaster-Carr

Look at the heat dissipating fiberglass sleeving with silicone cover

Keep up the good work
Cheers
Phil
Thanks Phil, I actually already have a few rolls of self adhesive aluminium pipe wrap which I was going to use on the rad pipes. However I like the idea of using some kind of sleeve, will be easier to fit and also to remove should I need to get the pipes out. I will keep a look out for something similar in the UK
 

Brian Kissel

Lifetime Supporter
I use this from McMaster Carr. I use it on hydraulic lines that are on a furnace, that reguraly have molten copper spilled on them. It lasts a long time under this abuse.
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Spark-Resistant High-Temperature Fiberglass SleevingMade of fiberglass with a silicone rubber coating, this sleeving sheds sparks and molten metal splash. Exposure to a torch will char the coating but won't scorch the fiberglass inner layer. Sleeving resists hydraulic fuels and lubricating oils. Temperature range is -65° to +500°F. Color is orange. To Order: Please specify length (1, 5, 10, 25, or maximum continuous length of 50 ft.).

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If you can't find anything in the UK, I can assist in shipping from here.

Regards Brian
 
Hi guys

I found this sleeving here in the UK. It's braided fiberglass sleeve with a thick coating of self-extinguishing high temperature silicone rubber coating. Is this the same stuff you are using? It says it's used to protect lines from heat/fire damage. I don't want to protect my rad pipes but stop them radiating heat so will this stuff do the job?

Techflex - Fireflex Silicone Coated Fiberglass Sleeving

 
I always wondered why the tornado pipes were copper when everyone else's I see are either stainless or ally.
I think they look a bit central heatingy and too many solder joints. But that's only my opinion. As for functionity ? Who knows
 
They are copper for ease of assembly, amongst other reasons. There are 2 very tight 90deg bends around the steering rack that would be nigh on impossible for the average home builder to self assemble in ally. Doing this also means that there are 2 complete pipes through the cabin area, so no hoses to leak.

However, none of this stops a builder having there own pipes made up.
 
I know there are other options out there other than copper but I've decided to simply get the car up and running using all the standard Tornado supplied parts and then I can look at what areas to upgrade after I've ran the car for a little while. Also as I already had the pipes I didn't want to spend more money on replacing the pipes when they don't seem to need replacing.

I agree they don't look amazing in copper and would like something a little more silver in colour but I'll look at getting the exposed sections of the pipes coated/painted at some point. As for the solder joins, they are behind a front bulkhead panel so you can't see them.
 
Spot on Trev. Given that 99% of the time no one will see the pipes it doesn't really matter that they are in copper.

Although I am intrigued by Franks statement.

As for something to wrap them in for heat control, I to am struggling. Most of the stuff out there is to keep heat out not in. Im looking too, if I find anything I will let you know (Brett's exhaust wrap is the best I have come up with so far).
 
You guys are going to some expensive solutions for such a small problem. I don't mean to criticize, but I have two hot pipes flowing down the middle of my cabin and I don't have the least problem. The original flow path was the two pipes, one on top of the other. I didn't like it standing that high, so I bent them so they could lie flat on the floor side by side. Then I went to the closed cell foam wrap for AC pipes from the local hardware shop. They come in various diameters. Wraped them and taped the gap with duct tape. Then chopped up the old cover to make the now lower cover. Put that over the covered pipes. Attached it to the floor with sheetmetal screws. The seats didn't allow for the pipes to be side by side so they stayed over and under. The wrap had to be pieced into this area, as the pipes came pretty close together as they crossed eachother.


Then I added DynaPad cover and now I am waiting to get it covered in leather.That is a Toyota shifter by the way.


At present I have an opening in the firewall(Dynapad on the inside of the cabin) to the front clip area so I can get the fine tuning on the clutch setup.



I have a dam setup behind the front nostrils with a sheet of hard rubber and that is it. There are two rubber radiator connectors to the radiator pipes. This may be where our setups differ, and you may need something more for this area. But if you insulate well and make sure you have all the airgoing out the nostrils, then that small area in front of the firewall is the one you should concentrate on.



This area will be tidyed up over the winter. I have one good trip of about 60 miles all in one day at highway speeds and city streets as well. Start up temps were in the 40s and afternoon temps were in the high 60s. I startred out with the side windows in place(currently no vents in them). and removed only the drivers side for the afternoon. Absolutely no heat problems. I realize our cabins may be a little different, but it doesn't need to be overengineered.

Bill
 

Andy Sheldon

Tornado Sports Cars
I would also be interested in the many reasons not to use copper. I can only think of advantages.

It does not rust. It does not break down. It has no impurities. It does not resist waterflow. Its ductile. Its easy to work. Can be joined easily using solder and a torch using slip joint fittings resulting in a leak free joint.

As many of our kits are built by the home builder the water pipes can be installed and joined resulting in only 4 coupler hoses being required. Two at the radiator and two on the engine block. Less joints means fewer potential leaks and fewer cooling issues.

Maybe thats why are cars cool so well?

I have also seen cars plumbed with lengths of straight stainless or aluminium and lots of elbows and couplers which are each a potential leak waiting to happen.

Anyway I am off now to re plumb my House using stainless steel and silicone joiners.

Thanks

Andy
 
The only thing i can think of is, to take a look at the corrossion potential of different metals in combination with a electrolytic liquid.


If we take a look onto the row of electríc potentials of different metals it looks like:

Copper ++ (+0,34V Standard)
Stainless Steel ++ (+0,1 - +0,4 V Standard, depending on alloy)
Iron - (-0,44 V Standard)
Aluminium 99,9 --(-1,66 V Standard)

with all the alloys of them inbetween, below or above.

So there is not realy a big difference inbetween using copper or stainless steel for plumbing your car, if you talk about corrossion potential. Both of them are on the positive side of current potential and will lead to corrossion of the metals on the negative side under certain conditions (especially if you have a liquid with strong electrolytic potential). It is also a question of relation of surface areas.

in simple words ( and it is not that simple) .
If you have a full aluminium engine and aluminium radiator, best would be to use aluminium tubing as well.

If you have a full cast FE engine than you could use stainless or copper with no big effects, but the use of aluminium tubing would be for sure avoid any corrossion on your engine and lesser the risk of corrossion on your radiator, tubing and or waterpump.

Plus there is a weight advantage of using aluminium.

The key anyway is the use of a good corrossion inhibitting cooling liquid (usually destilled water with specific glykol liquids). THis would be a liwuid not able to transport or support the transport of electrons and thus not leading to corrossion. This will allow you almost any combination.
Usually you always have a rubber hose between the different metals, so the liquid is realy the only element to connect them. If this liquid has a low electric leading potential, there should be now issue with any combination.

In terms of flow, Andy is spot on. THe less connections, the less hard sweeping elbows the better it will be.

BTW: Andy, my house is completly plumbed in stainless stell already :)

TOM
 
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Firstly.
Tom, Typical German efficiency, you have calculations on materials VS water !

Andy plumbing in YOUR MANSION in stainless would be a lot cheaper than copper
at todays copper rates !

Trev, If I'm still alive when you finish the car let me come to the unvieling.

So much fuss about pipes and covering them up, just put it together and use it....

Merry Christmas by the way to all of you and a prosperous new year.
 
Firstly.
Tom, Typical German efficiency, you have calculations on materials VS water !

Andy plumbing in YOUR MANSION in stainless would be a lot cheaper than copper
at todays copper rates !

Trev, If I'm still alive when you finish the car let me come to the unvieling.

So much fuss about pipes and covering them up, just put it together and use it....

Merry Christmas by the way to all of you and a prosperous new year.
Keith

what would we talk about else ?:laugh:

merry christmas
TOM
 
Trev, If I'm still alive when you finish the car let me come to the unvieling.
It takes as long as it takes. Not everyone has the time or resources to throw at it.

Much better to do a good job, than throw it together. Besides, for some of us, the building is the best bit.
 
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