Had a look under the skin of J-5

The Henry Ford Museum has lifted the hoods of a few cars in there collection and that was too good an opportunity for me to miss. Arriving on a Tuesday (1-27) morning just before they opened, allowed me to set up the tripod and spend as must time as I needed to capture whatever details I could.
It seems that the big auto show had just finished in Detroit so there were a large group of Japanese auto industry guys that spied me with my camera gear and wanted me to take their pictures with Mustang #1. There was a lot of bowing and handing me their phones for the portrait with M-1. It was fun ---
So – here are a few to look at, the hard core bad to the bone Ferrari killer that it is.
 

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Great pics Ray. Awesome machine, a real piece of American history.

The one feature that really jumps out at me is the two simple four barrel carbs sitting there. No quad webers or early injection set up or anything exotic at all. I would guess these were all tried and rejected as the fueling method of choice. The four barrel Holley - simple and efficient.

Must have been a fun day for you with your camera! Keep up the good work.
 

Randy V

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Some amazing pictures Ray...

Conventional pictures are great, but it's the ones from unconventional angles that show the bottom sides of things.. Pictures like that are invaluable to the person doing a good restoration or trying to build a spot-on replica...

Thanks for taking and sharing!!
 

Ian Anderson

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Hi
Question for the history buffs here
Were aero quip type fittings used on these cars back in the day?

Ian
 
Hi
Question for the history buffs here
Were aero quip type fittings used on these cars back in the day?

Ian
I think so. Looking at period photos of P1016 and a J car they show Aeroquip fuel and transmission lines. On a related matter how did the paint and glass restoration of J-6 go after its shipping damage?
 
Some amazing pictures Ray...

Conventional pictures are great, but it's the ones from unconventional angles that show the bottom sides of things.. Pictures like that are invaluable to the person doing a good restoration or trying to build a spot-on replica...

Thanks for taking and sharing!!
You're very welcome ---
The access was limited so there was only so much I could capture.
If someone needs me to highlight a particular area or component just ask and I can post it up.
 

Randy V

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You know, I looked for weeks to find the end of a GT40 MK1 door.. Where the latch was.. All I found was just very poor images. A friend of mine was at the Historics and took a couple of pictures for me.. Wonderful!

Another one was when I was looking for a good sky shot that was looking down at the radiator through the dual nostrils of a MK1 hood panel..
There are many others That people can use.. Your shots of the underside of the oil cooler will be really valuable to someone like me some day!
 
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The little out of the way details are what I find most interesting. The particular bolts and rivets used, the safety wire, what is just a bit scruffy and what is polished.
The term "hard core" is tossed around so much nowadays - this car is it . .
 

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Randy V

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What a brute this car was in the day...

Talk about moving heaven and earth to claw your way to victory - these cars and their drivers would do it!

Good stuff Ray!!!
 

D. Nye

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Ray,
Really enjoy seeing detailed pictures of J5. It's very interesting how it is different than the other J cars raced in 1967. In your first post the engine closeup shows an intake manifold which looks more like a mid rise than a tunnel port manifold. I thought all the cars raced in 67 had tunnel port engines.
Thanks again for the great pictures.
Don
 
Ray,
Really enjoy seeing detailed pictures of J5. It's very interesting how it is different than the other J cars raced in 1967. In your first post the engine closeup shows an intake manifold which looks more like a mid rise than a tunnel port manifold. I thought all the cars raced in 67 had tunnel port engines.
Thanks again for the great pictures.
Don
You're welcome.
There's real history here and I'm glad to share with like minded enthusiast.
 

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Great pics Ray. Awesome machine, a real piece of American history.

The one feature that really jumps out at me is the two simple four barrel carbs sitting there. No quad webers or early injection set up or anything exotic at all. I would guess these were all tried and rejected as the fueling method of choice. The four barrel Holley - simple and efficient.
Cliff these had evolution history as the 1966 MKII ran with single holleys.
Regards Allan
 
Ray, I enjoyed your photos of J5. Was out to the museum last weekend, and took photos of some different views, tried to include the rear body where the shipping damage was. Also noticed the damage to the front nose, don’t know if it’s vintage ( someone sitting on the nose after Le Mans 1967?).

regards
Jim P.

 

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Hello Jim - didn't notice your reply and pictures until today.
Great pictures of the Mk4 - there must be a story about the picture of the group riding on the car.
I was able to spend some time at the museum this weekend and got a few new shots.
 

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