Jokes anyone? -

Larry L.

Lifetime Supporter
^^^^^
There's a lot of truth in that.
My in-laws have a small fridge made in about 1948 or so ('NOT a misprint) that's still running perfectly. I kid you not.
But, then again, I've been told light bulbs made in Europe routinely last a person's lifetime...or at least they used to...
 

Neil

Supporter
Larry, European light bulbs have always been similar to other incandescents-- well, maybe not the Chinese ones-- so their "lifetime" depended on the AC line voltage they were operated on. In fact, their lifetime varies inversely as 1E12. That is to the 12th power! I ran across this data from GE way back in the '60s.
 

Larry L.

Lifetime Supporter
Larry, European light bulbs have always been similar to other incandescents-- well, maybe not the Chinese ones-- so their "lifetime" depended on the AC line voltage they were operated on. In fact, their lifetime varies inversely as 1E12. That is to the 12th power! I ran across this data from GE way back in the '60s.
ANOTHER MYTH shattered!!! ;-)
 

Larry L.

Lifetime Supporter
Or Larry maybe your memory came from seeing this one being switched on ;)
1. Ediswan Light Bulb
Year Turned On: 1883
Current Age: 134 years old
Location: Heysham, England
Ya...I do remember reading quite some time back about a light bulb that's been burning practically since the Earth cooled. I'm assuming this one was probably it.
But, the 'last-a-lifetime' bulbs I mentioned I recall reading were rather ubiquitous in Europe (at least at one time)...with the article's author bemoaning the fact that U.S. companies couldn't - or WOULDN'T - make similar bulbs here. Perhaps the Ediswan bulb was the entire basis for his article?
I dunno.
 
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