Rumbles SLC Build

Here is a PIC of the removable oil cooler. You can see the on the back side of the cooler that the cooling fan and its power relay are part of the assembly. On the inboard side, there is an 1/8" aluminum plate mounting bracket.



Here is the oil cooler mounted in the car. The bottom bracket bolts directly into the lower chassis member. The top of the cooler bolts to an 1/8" aluminum bracket that is permanently attached to the upper chassis member. You can see the nut-serts in the upper bracket. There are also nut-serts embedded in the lower chassis member as well to receive the lower bolts.



This is a very strong mounting system that has stood the test of time.
 
Are you doing maintenance to the cooler or something the cooler was blocking?
Yes, I'm doing my annual Winter maintenance, so my SLC is ready for care free driving this Spring. For example, change the oil, lube the heim joints, clean up the engine compartment, and tweak/refine the little things on my punch list.

One of the things on the preventative maintenance list this year is to replace the battery. Its working just fine and has plenty of juice to start the engine, but its 5 years old. Its better change it in comfort of my garage than to wait until it gets weak and leaves me stranded over the next year or two.

The battery is hidden in the driver's side pod, but I wanted it to be easy to replace. So I connected the battery with extra long cables, so you can pull it out, set it on the floor and swap the battery cables while the car is on jack stands.

 

Joel K

Supporter
Awsome build thread and beautiful car. I just purchased your build journal and looking forward to reading it. I am near the decision point at which car to build. Right now it is between an SLC-1, GT-R, and a factory 5 Daytona Coupe so just trying to read all I can to make the best decision.
 
Awsome build thread and beautiful car. I just purchased your build journal and looking forward to reading it. I am near the decision point at which car to build. Right now it is between an SLC-1, GT-R, and a factory 5 Daytona Coupe so just trying to read all I can to make the best decision.
I built a Factory Five '33 Hot Rod, before the SLC. It was a fun build. FFR is a good kit car company as well that offers good cars. In my mind, the difference is that the FFR cars are really "good" performers while RCR cars tend to be a level above in terms of being serious track machines.

One exception is the FFR GTM, which I suggest you avoid. The GTM has known structural and body fitment issues.

I also published a "Car Builder Journal: Factory Five Racing '33 Hot Rod" book on Amazon. That will give you an idea of how the FFR Daytona build will differ. Click here to see the Car Builder Journal: Factory Five Racing '33 Hot Rod.

Send me a PM if you want to talk about my experience in building the 2 cars.

 
This past weekend was the Charlotte AutoFair, one of the largest car shows in the USA. My SLC was invited to be the "center piece" of the show with all the publicity that goes with it. It was placed in the center of the AutoFair Showcase Pavilion with all the rest of the feature cars around it. I even pushed the "ToyMakerz" TV cars to the side.

I did a video interview with Lou Santiago that you should see on MAV TV this summer.

 

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This past weekend was the Charlotte AutoFair, one of the largest car shows in the USA. My SLC was invited to be the "center piece" of the show with all the publicity that goes with it. It was placed in the center of the AutoFair Showcase Pavilion with all the rest of the feature cars around it. I even pushed the "ToyMakerz" TV cars to the side.

I did a video interview with Lou Santiago that you should see on MAV TV this summer.

I was at the auto fair buying plenty of junk I don’t need. Saw your car in one of the show buildings. Good looking thing.
 
I was at the auto fair buying plenty of junk I don’t need. Saw your car in one of the show buildings. Good looking thing.
Sorry I missed you Adam.

BTW, I was kinda kidding about the ToyMakerz. They were setup next to me, so I got to know the ToyMakerz gang. Their shop is in Reidsville (not far from Charlotte). David Ankin (ToyMakerz shop owner) and I were 2 the first to show for an early Thursday morning local TV interview, so he and I went to breakfast while he waited for his crew to arrive. David, Ashley and the rest of the Toymakerz crew are as much fun as they seem to be on TV. They had some of their latest builds on display at AutoFair. Thank goodness they have interesting projects that are something other than the typical muscle car or hot rod.







 
I'm continuing my theme of recent posts on SLC maintenance. Its not sexy, but building your SLC so "its cheap to keep" is something you should think about.

Today's topic is suspension rattles, squeaks and growns. I built my SLC to be as quiet inside as possible, so I hear lots of little noises that louder SLC owners may never hear.

I resolved most of the noises during the shake down and have completely torn apart all 4 corners of my suspension several times to find all those unsavory noises.

The source of the suspension noises are generally:
  • Loose mono-ball in a rod end: This causes a rattling sound over bumps. To correct the problem, replace the rod end.
  • Tight mono-ball in a rod end: This sounds a lot like a loose mono-ball. The noise happens when the suspension just begins to move over a bump. This is because the mono-ball is sticking within its socket, and when it is forced to move it makes a noise as it breaks free. To differentiate between a loose or tight mono-ball, put the car up on jack stands and use a floor jack under the tire to slowly raise the suspension. If it creaks like a haunted house, the mono-ball is sticking. To correct the problem, first try to work some grease into the mono-ball socket. I saw a post on this forum a while back recommending Valvoline Cerulean High pressure grease and it works great. If you are worried about the grease attracting dirt, you can install rod end boots. I have also seen posts recommending that you keep them dry, or lubricate with graphite, or lubricate with dry silicone, but these methods did not work for me.
  • Loose lock nuts: There are lock nuts throughout the suspension to secure the rod ends, tie rods, push rods, etc. If the lock nut is not tight, the Rod end / tie rod will rattle within the tolerances of its threaded section. To correct the problem, tighten the lock nut.
  • Loose wheel bearing: This is a rattling sound. You can find this by shaking the wheel when the suspension is unloaded. To correct the problem, replace the bearing unit.
  • Tire rubbing on body: This is a scraping or growning noise. I consider any tire to body rubbing a safety problem. I had a growning noise after the car was painted. There was just enough paint thickness buildup inside the front wheel well to cause a minor tire rubbing problem. I simply adjusted the inner panel to gain clearance.

I have experienced all the above problems in my SLC. I simply attacked/resolved the loudest noise, then the next loudest noise, and the next loudest noise, ... through many iterations.

I had one pesky rattle in the right rear suspension that I've been chasing for a year. I completely tore that suspension apart for the third time yesterday and finally found the problem. Both mono-balls in the shock were loose.

Fortunately, I live near Mooresville (Race City USA) and there are numerious shops within 10 miles of me who specialize in racing shocks. I went to RE Suspensions and they had the replacement mono-ball units for $30 each. The Mono-balls are held in the shock with a ring clip, so they pop out easily.

If you need one of these shock mono-balls, Go to RESuspension.com and order part # RE-MO-8T-45. Tell them Bill Phillips sent you :laugh:

In the photo below, you can see the new replacement mono-ball is much more beefy.
 

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FYI - summit carries the mono-ball replacement manufactured by QA1; PN COM8T-102PK. They're currently $25/pair (1 pair per shock required).

QA1 Shock Bearing Kits COM8T-102PK - Free Shipping on Orders Over $99 at Summit Racing

Bill - I think yours is the first confirmed case of a steel bearing to have gone south in these shocks, maybe others have been replacing these preventatively. My front shocks were delivered with teflon bearings and my rears were already upgraded to the steel.

In the pic below the mono-ball on the left is steel and the one on the right is teflon.



There's a short discussion of this subject on my blog at this link, scroll all the way to the bottom:

11. Suspended suspension – Cam's Superlite SLC
 
I'm interested in adding wireless remote control switches to my steering wheel. I remember that another SLC builder on this forum did that, but I can't find the posts.

Can someone point me to the thread on wireless steering wheel switches...Thanks
 
I believe the folks you’ll want to ping are AJ, Mark Setter, and Granville for info on the steering wheel mounted switches. I think AJ is making his custom whereas both Mark and Granville are using the Raptor Pro system.
 
If you have the Infinity Power Box system the 663360 above is the easiest install. Just connect the systems inputs to ground then match the systems outputs to the master cell inputs.
 
I want to do a stand alone system (vs Infinity box), so it sounds like I want to review AJ's thread.

I get a "forum server error" message when I try to search for "AJ". Can you send me link... Sorry to be so needy
 
HI Bill, this is A.J. Here's the link to my build thread with the steering wheel
A.J.'s SL-C build thread

I built mine from scratch around a Momo wheel. I used a cheap remote control/receiver system from ebay. Everything works, although I don't know how robust it will be since the car isn't quite running. If you have any questions or want to discuss, shoot me a PM.
 
I'm ashamed to say that I have not even started my SLC is the past 9 months. Its just been sitting in my garage while I was heads down on my current project, the Tiger 700. Spring is around the corner here in the Carolinas, so I thought I'd get my SLC ready. I don't have any sort of Battery Tender or charger connected to my SLC. Even after sitting for 9 months, it started in an instant.

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The SLC is a beautiful car that is fun to drive, but I always wanted to design and build a car from scratch. I started the Tiger 700 project by penning the conceptual drawings, then sculpting a 1/6th scale clay model, followed by a CAD design for a chassis and suspension that would fit within the body. I spent a fair amount of time learning about proper suspension geometry and did virtual suspension simulations to ensure good handling characteristics. Then I built the chassis and suspension, added driver controls and built the electrical harness. Its now a running driving car that is ready to register and it only weighs 525lbs (that's not a typo). I'm currently in the "artsy" stage of sculpting the body out of foam blocks. The body has a long way to go, but you can get an idea of the direction its heading by looking at the green clay model.

If you're interested in following my project, search YouTube for "Tiger 700 Project". There are 16 video episodes so far and many more to come. If you want more details, you can follow my "Rumbles Tiger 700 Build" thread on the Locost forum.
 
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